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Science Current Events and Science News | Brightsurf | June 07, 2017


Are wealthier people more likely to receive a diagnosis of cancer?
Do wealthier people receive too much medical care? The Dartmouth Institute's H.
FSU researchers find plus-size fashion models improve women's psychological health
FSU researchers Russell Clayton and Jessica Ridgway discover women pay more attention and experience improved psychological health when they view average and plus-size models in the media.
Vanderbilt-led study disputes link between uterine fibroids and miscarriage risk
A 10-year study, led by Vanderbilt University Medical Center professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology Katherine Hartmann, M.D., Ph.D., disrupts conventional wisdom that uterine fibroids cause miscarriages.
Genes influence ability to read a person's mind from their eyes
Our DNA influences our ability to read a person's thoughts and emotions from looking at their eyes, suggests a new study published in the journal Molecular Psychiatry.
Dining hall intervention helped college students choose healthier options
As most college students' diets are low in fruits and vegetables and high in calories, sugar, fat, and sodium, researchers from the University of Toronto and Memorial University of Newfoundland created a cross-sectional study to examine whether messaging encouraging fruit, vegetable, and water intake could influence the habits of university students.
Which extinct ducks could fly?
We're all familiar with flightless birds: ostriches, emus, penguins -- and ducks?
Effectiveness of antipsychotic treatments in patients with Schizophrenia
A new study published by JAMA Psychiatry examines the comparative effectiveness of antipsychotic treatments for the prevention of psychiatric rehospitalization and treatment failure among a nationwide group of patients with schizophrenia in Sweden.
Nanoparticles and magnets offer new, efficient method of removing oil from water
In a study published this spring in the Journal of Nanoparticle Research, engineering researchers used magnetic nanoparticles to separate oil from water through a simple process that relies on electrostatic force and a magnet.
New study shows important economic contributions of H-1B visas
A new study in the INFORMS journal Management Science shows that the US economy is strengthened by H-1B visa holders who fill key roles in enhancing organizations and supplementing the work of their US peers.
How have HPV vaccines affected cervical cancer screening?
A new review looks at cervical cancer screening in the era of HPV vaccination.
New treatment hope for women with BRCA1 breast cancers
Researchers have found a new way to use immunotherapy, a breakthrough mode of cancer treatment which harnesses the patient's immune system, to treat an aggressive form of breast cancer.
3-D-modeling of food residues in 230 million years old fossil feces
Synchrotron scanning can produce high-quality 3-D models of well-preserved food residues from fossil feces.
Waste not, want not
Nutritious feed for cattle is complex. As the summer season progresses, grass can become harder to digest.
Hospitals that carry out more research are more efficient
Public hospitals that generate more scientific publications are also more efficient at attending patients, according to a study by Universidad Carlos III de Madrid (UC3M) and the IE Business School.
Small climb in mean temperatures linked to far higher chance of deadly heat waves
An increase in mean temperature of 0.5 degrees Celsius over half a century may not seem all that serious, but it's enough to have more than doubled the probability of a heat wave killing in excess of 100 people in India, according to researchers at the University of California, Irvine and other institutions.
Religious coping may affect couples dealing with type 2 diabetes
A new study indicates that spousal engagement in shared glycemic control activities -- such as planning a healthy diet -- may help patients with type 2 diabetes control their blood sugar levels.
Bread and health: A personal matter
In the past few decades, since white bread has acquired a bad name, bakeries have been going out of their way to produce high-quality whole grain breads.
Study examines self-management intervention in patients with epilepsy
A new study has found that a multi-component self-management intervention (MCI) for adults with epilepsy may be an important tool to increase efficiency in epilepsy care.
Sea urchin protein provides insights into self-assembly of skeletal structures
Calcium carbonate combined with sea urchin proteins form tiny stacks of 'bricks' that creates a structure which provides a tough, exoskeleton defense for the sea creature.
Study finds link between teen cannabis use & illicit drug use in early adulthood
Researchers from the University of Bristol have found regular and occasional cannabis use as a teen is associated with a greater risk of other illicit drug taking in early adulthood.
Feared by drug users but hard to avoid, fentanyl takes a mounting toll
In a pair of studies of Rhode Island's opioid overdose epidemic, Brown University researchers show that while heroin users appear desperate to avoid fentanyl, it's killing more of them every year.
Can pain increase the risk of dying early?
Pain that interferes with daily life, rather than pain per se, was associated with an increased risk of early death in a recent analysis.
Mutations unveiled that predispose lung cancers to refractory histologic transformation
Cancer pedigree analysis reveals the mutations in RB1 and TP53 genes play a key role in treatment-resistant, cancer cell-type transformation during EGFR inhibitor therapy for lung cancers.
Excessive exercise may damage the gut
A review of published studies has found that people who exercise excessively may be prone to acute or chronic gut issues.
Mouse lemur could serve as ideal model for primate biology and human disease
The mouse lemur -- the world's smallest primate -- has the potential to transform the field of genetics and serve as an ideal model for a wide range of primate biology, behavior and medicine, including cardiovascular disease and Alzheimer's disease, Stanford University School of Medicine researchers say.
High-pressure experiments solve meteorite mystery
With high-pressure experiments at DESY's X-ray light source PETRA III and other facilities, a research team has solved a long standing riddle in the analysis of meteorites from Moon and Mars.
Reshaping Darwin's tree of life
In 1859, Charles Darwin included a novel tree of life in his trailblazing book on the theory of evolution, On the Origin of Species.
New technique enables 3-D printing with paste of silicone particles in water
Using the principles behind the formation of sandcastles from wet sand, North Carolina State University researchers have achieved 3-D printing of flexible and porous silicone rubber structures through a new technique that combines water with solid and liquid forms of silicone into a pasty ink that can be fed through a 3-D printer.
Moroccan fossils show human ancestors' diet of game
New fossil finds from the Jebel Irhoud archaeological site in Morocco do more than push back the origins of our species by 100,000 years.
Turning car plastics into foams with coconut oil
End-of-life vehicles, with their plastic, metal and rubber components, are responsible for millions of tons of waste around the world each year.
Electric car subsidies may do more harm than good
A new study by Concordia economics professor Ian Irvine shows that subsidizing EVs in the North American context will not reduce GHG emissions in the short-term, and may even increase them -- at a cost to taxpayers.
Study reveals level of magnesium sulfate to prevent cerebral palsy in preterm infants
A new study suggests that to optimize neuroprotection and prevent cerebral palsy in extremely preterm infants, women should receive magnesium sulfate to obtain a blood level between 3.7 and 4.4 mg/dL at the time of delivery.
Regular/occasional teen cannabis use linked to other drug taking in early adulthood
Regular and occasional cannabis use as a teen is linked to a heightened risk of other illicit drug taking in early adulthood, finds research published online in the Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health.
Detecting autism in infants before symptoms emerge
According to the results of a new study, a brain scan can detect functional changes in babies as young as six months of age that predicts later diagnosis with autism spectrum disorder (ASD).
Red onions pack a cancer-fighting punch, study reveals
A University of Guelph study is the first to reveal that Ontario-grown red onions are the most effective at killing colon and breast cancer cells compared to other types of onions.
Overcoming immune suppression to fight against bovine leukemia
A newly developed antibody drug reactivates suppressed immune cells, decreasing the bovine leukemia virus (BLV) counts in an infected cow.
Blood test can predict onset and track progression of Huntington's disease
The first blood test that can predict the onset and progression of Huntington's disease has been identified by a UCL-led study.
SLU researcher finds cause and possible relief of cancer bone pain
Saint Louis University scientist Daniela Salvemini, Ph.D., reports discovering a key pathway that drives cancer-related bone pain while providing a potential solution with a drug that already is on the market.
Oyster shells inspire new method to make superstrong, flexible polymers
Columbia Engineers developed a method inspired by the nacre of oyster shells, a composite material with extraordinary mechanical properties, including great strength and resilience.
What causes women to stop breastfeeding early?
A recent systematic literature review has investigated potential sociodemographic, physical, mental, and social factors that may cause breastfeeding mothers to stop breastfeeding before infants reach 6 months of age.
Pregnancy diet high in refined grains could increase kids' obesity by age 7
Children born to women with gestational diabetes whose diet included high proportions of refined grains may have a higher risk of obesity by age 7, compared to children born to women with gestational diabetes who ate low proportions of refined grains, according to results from a National Institutes of Health study.
Scientists find world's oldest fossil mushroom
Roughly 115 million years ago, when the ancient supercontinent Gondwana was breaking apart, a mushroom fell into a river and began an improbable journey.
New-generation material removes iodine from water
Material developed at Dartmouth College scrubs iodine from water for the first time and could hold the key to cleaning nuclear accidents.
Running multiple marathons does not increase risk of atherosclerosis
Running multiple marathons does not increase the risk of atherosclerosis, according to research published today in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology.
Does consuming low-fat dairy increase the risk of Parkinson's disease?
Consuming at least three servings of low-fat dairy a day is associated with a greater risk of developing Parkinson's disease compared to consuming less than one serving a day, according to a large study published in the June 7, 2017, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.
Offshore wind turbines vulnerable to Category 5 hurricane gusts
Offshore wind turbines built according to current standards may not be able to withstand the powerful gusts of a Category 5 hurricane, creating potential risk for any such turbines built in hurricane-prone areas, new University of Colorado Boulder-led research shows.
Fungi awake bacteria from their slumber
When a soil dries out, this has a negative impact on the activity of soil bacteria.
Aggressive flies: A powerful new model for neuropsychiatric disorders
A new Drosophila model to study the role of schizophrenia-associated gene PRODH in behavioral disorders reveals that precise regulation of proline metabolism in the lateral neurons ventral region of the brain is crucial for maintaining normal behavior patterns.
Study reveals how a hormone increases sucrose accumulation in sugarcane
A group of researchers at the University of Campinas's Biology Institute (IB-UNICAMP) in São Paulo State, in collaboration with colleagues at the Agronomy Institute (IAC) and at the University of São Paulo's Chemistry Institute (IQ-USP), have discovered how chemical ripeners, which are analogous to plant hormones, act on the molecular level in sugarcane to increase sucrose storage in the plant.
Bee buzzes could help determine how to save their decreasing population
Widespread and effective monitoring of bees could lead to better management of populations; however, tracking bees is tricky and costly.
Prebiotics reduce body fat in overweight children
There may soon be a new tool in the fight against childhood obesity.
World's 'first named dinosaur' reveals new teeth with scanning tech
Pioneering technology has shed fresh light on the world's first scientifically-described dinosaur fossil -- over 200 years after it was first discovered -- thanks to research by WMG at the University of Warwick and the University of Oxford's Museum of Natural History.
GW researcher finds centenarians have lower incidence of chronic illness
GW researchers studied the life and health span of a group of centenarian World War II veterans at the VA medical center in Washington, D.C.
Imaging technique could be game changer for pharma
In drug development, the body can be something of a black box.
Survival of the fittest -- Biology's role in sustainable power generation
Scientists from the University of Geneva are using the rules of genetics to better understand how to incorporate wind and solar power into the current electrical grid to produce a renewable power system.
Easing family distress: New international guidelines to identify dementia with Lewy bodies
New guidelines have been published on the clinical and physical indicators to help ensure patients with dementia with Lewy bodies get an accurate diagnosis and the best care possible.
The first of our kind
New finds of fossils and stone tools from the archaeological site of Jebel Irhoud, Morocco, push back the origins of our species by one hundred thousand years and show that by about 300 thousand years ago important changes in our biology and behaviour had taken place across most of Africa.
Diagnostic radiation exposure safe for children, experts state
In an article published in the June issue of The Journal of Nuclear Medicine, researchers assert that exposure to medical imaging radiation not only doesn't increase an adult person's risk of getting cancer, it doesn't increase a child's risk.
Seismic CT scan points to rapid uplift of Southern Tibet
Rice University geophysicists have conducted a three-year seismic CT scan of the upper mantle beneath the Tibetan Plateau and concluded that the southern half of the 'Roof of the World' formed within 10 million years, or less than one-quarter of the time since the beginning of the India-Eurasia continental collision.
A small group of neurons modulates the amount of insulin that the pancreas must produce
The results published in Cell Metabolism help to understand diabetes in greater detail.
Study links certain characteristics with ISIS anxiety
A new study examines the characteristics of individuals who are most likely to have anxiety concerning threats posed by ISIS.
Scientists improve people's creativity through electrical brain stimulation
Scientists have found a way to improve creativity through brain stimulation, according to researchers at Queen Mary University of London (QMUL) and Goldsmiths University of London.
Social experience tweaks genome function to modify future behavior
What changes in the brain of an animal when its behavior is altered by experience?
Improvements in control of cardiovascular risk factors not seen at all socioeconomic levels in US
Between 1999 to 2014, there was a decline in average systolic blood pressure, smoking, and predicted cardiovascular risk of 20 percent or greater among high-income US adults, but these levels remained unchanged in adults with incomes at or below the federal poverty level, according to a study published by JAMA Cardiology.
How to reduce shockwaves in quantum beam experiments
While skimmers have been a necessary component in atomic and molecular-beam experiments for decades, they were also known to impose a fundamental limit on the number of particles one could pack into the beam.
Monkey see, monkey do, depending on age, experience and efficiency
Wild capuchin monkeys readily learn skills from each other -- but that social learning is driven home by the payoff of learning a useful new skill.
'Charliecloud' simplifies Big Data supercomputing
At Los Alamos National Laboratory, home to more than 100 supercomputers since the dawn of the computing era, elegance and simplicity of programming are highly valued but not always achieved.
Eggs can significantly increase growth in young children
Eggs significantly increased growth and reduced stunting by 47 percent in young children, finds a new study from a leading expert on child nutrition at the Brown School at Washington University in St.
Altruism changing Western society
Altruism based on individual values is changing Western society. People in Western countries have seen a rise in individualism for quite some time, and this in turn helps to create generations of people with altruistic mindsets.
Climate change misconceptions common among teachers, study finds
A new study by Mizzou education researchers shows that many secondary school science teachers possess climate change misconceptions similar to average Americans.
New study on children shows fiber supplement changes gut bacteria
University of Calgary research on children demonstrated that a prebiotic supplement changed their gut bacteria and after four months, the children in the study had a decrease in body fat and the fat around their abdomen.
Microbiology: Many forks make light work
New insights into the control of DNA replication and cell division in Corynebacterium glutamicum, a biotechnologically important microorganism, could help to optimize the industrial production of amino acids.
New fabric coating could thwart chemical weapons, save lives
Chemical weapons are nightmarish. In a millisecond, they can kill hundreds, if not thousands.
Engineering a new cancer detection tool
E. coli may have potentially harmful effects but scientists in Australia have discovered this bacterium produces a toxin which binds to an unusual sugar that is part of carbohydrate structures present on cells not usually produced by healthy cells.
Researchers demonstrate spin effects in solution-based nanocrystals
Wet-chemically produced nanocrystals are becoming more and more powerful. Now a research group around Dr.
Predicting autism: Study links infant brain connections to diagnoses at age 2
In two previous studies, University of North Carolina researchers and colleagues linked infant brain anatomy differences to autism diagnoses at age two.
Data from satellite imagery useful for malaria early warning systems
Researchers in Sweden have developed a model that uses seasonal weather data from satellite images to accurately predict outbreak of malaria with a one-month lead time.
Recent presidential election could have negative impact on health
Stress, increased risk for disease, babies born too early, and premature death are among the negative health impacts that could occur in the wake of the 2016 US presidential election, according to a new article from Harvard T.H.
Building 'OLEDs' from the ground up for better electronics
From smartphones to TVs and laptops, light emitting diode (LED) displays are ubiquitous.
Rising sea levels will boost moderate floods in some areas, severe floods in others
A new study by researchers at Princeton and Rutgers universities finds that sea-level rise over the next 50 to 100 years will lead to moderate coastal flooding in regions already prone to floods, but to more severe flooding in regions where such floods are currently rare.
Finding new homes won't help Emperor penguins cope with climate change
Unlike other species that migrate successfully to escape the wrath of climate change, a new study shows that dispersal may help sustain global Emperor penguin populations for a limited time, but, as sea ice conditions continue to deteriorate, the 54 colonies that exist today will face devastating declines by the end of this century.
'Immunoswitch' particles may be key to more-effective cancer immunotherapy
Scientists at Johns Hopkins have created a nanoparticle that carries two different antibodies capable of simultaneously switching off cancer cells' defensive properties while switching on a robust anticancer immune response in mice.
Particulate air pollution linked to poor survival in liver cancer patients
In a recent study, exposure to particulate air pollution after being diagnosed with liver cancer was significantly associated with an increased risk of premature death.
Highly safe biocontainment strategy hopes to encourage greater use of GMOs
An extremely safe and practical biocontainment strategy has been born.
Coal waste fuel may reduce anthropogenic emissions, TPU study reveals
Power engineering scientists from Tomsk Polytechnic University have shown the combustion of fuel based on coal processing wastes produces much less contaminants than the use of traditional coals.
Wine descriptions make us more emotional about wine
Research by the University of Adelaide has shown that consumers are much more influenced by wine label descriptions than previously thought.
Risk of cardiac malformations from lithium during pregnancy less significant
New research suggests there may be a more modest increased risk of cardiac defects when using lithium during the first trimester of pregnancy.
Retailers charging women more than men for common hair loss medication
Women pay an average of 40 percent more than men for minoxidil foams -- a hair loss remedy most commonly known as Rogaine -- according to a new analysis from researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania.
Metabolism: Beta cells under fire
Type 2 diabetes causes pathological changes in the beta cells.
Recycling plant material into stock chemicals with electrochemistry
While most people think of recycling in terms of the packaging for household products, the concept can extend to the chemistry to make them in the first place.
Exercise may help combat postpartum depression
An analysis of published studies indicates that physical exercise during pregnancy and the postpartum period is a safe way to achieve better psychological well-being and to reduce postpartum depressive symptoms.
Researchers identify gene that may play a central role in heart disease
Although lifestyle choices contribute to heart disease, genetics play a major role.
Geology and biology agree on Pangaea supercontinent breakup dates
Scientists at The Australian National University have found that independent estimates from geology and biology agree on the timing of the breakup of the Pangaea supercontinent into today's continents.
Certain cardiovascular medications may increase risk of falling
A new analysis suggests that among older adults who take cardiovascular medications, those using non-selective beta-blockers may be at an increased of falling compared with those using selective beta-blockers.
Retinal cells 'go with the flow' to assess own motion through space
A new study in Nature helps to explain how specialized retinal cells help stabilize vision by perceiving how their owner is moving.
Researchers image quasiparticles that could lead to faster circuits, higher bandwidths
A research team led by Iowa State University's Zhe Fei has made the first images of half-light, half-matter quasiparticles called exciton-polaritons.
Type of sugar may treat atherosclerosis, mouse study shows
Studying mice, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St.
This week from AGU: Offshore wind turbines vulnerable to Category 5 hurricane gusts
Offshore wind turbines built according to current standards may not be able to withstand the powerful gusts of a Category 5 hurricane, creating potential risk for any such turbines built in hurricane-prone areas, according to a new study in Geophysical Research Letters.
Home blood pressure monitors inaccurate 70 percent of the time: Study
Seventy percent of readings from home blood pressure monitors are unacceptably inaccurate, which could cause serious implications for people who rely on them to make informed health decisions, new UAlberta research reveals.
Neuroimaging technique may help predict autism among high-risk infants
Functional connectivity magnetic resonance imaging (fcMRI) may predict which high-risk, 6-month old infants will develop autism spectrum disorder by age 2 years, according to a study funded by the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) and the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH), two components of the National Institutes of Health.
Michigan heart surgery outcomes improved after Medicaid expansion, study finds
Expanding Medicaid coverage is associated with better outcomes for heart surgery patients, according to a study led by University of Virginia School of Medicine researchers.
Study: Common surgical treatment for melanoma does not improve patients' overall survival
Patients who receive the standard surgical treatment for melanoma that has spread to one or more key lymph nodes do not live longer, a major new study shows.
New confirmation of Einstein's General Theory of Relativity
Albert Einstein predicted that whenever light from a distant star passes by a closer object, gravity acts as a kind of magnifying lens, brightening and bending distant starlight.
Cope's gray treefrogs meet the cocktail party problem
Our auditory system is able to home in on the message being conveyed by the person you're talking with even in a noisy room full of people.
Sleep apnea and insomnia combination linked with depression
A new study found that men with sleep apnea and insomnia have a higher prevalence and severity of depressive symptoms than men with sleep apnea or insomnia alone.
Mammograms: Are we overdiagnosing small tumors?
An analysis of breast cancer data revealed that many small breast cancers have an excellent prognosis because they are inherently slow growing, according to Yale Cancer Center experts.
Dating expert ages oldest modern human
A Griffith University geochronologist's state-of-the-art dating methods push back the origins of our species by an unprecedented 100,000 years, uncovering the oldest modern human and our deep biological history in Africa.
Many good years after heart bypass surgery -- but something happens after 10 years
The prognosis following heart bypass surgery is both good and has improved over the past three decades.
Many rape victims experience involuntary paralysis that prevents them from resisting
Active resistance is often considered to be the 'normal' reaction during rape, but a new study found that most victims may experience a state of involuntary paralysis, called tonic immobility, during rape.
Girls more likely to have sex, take sexual risks, and marry young if they menstruate early
The timing of a girl's first menstruation may affect her first sexual encounter, first pregnancy, and her vulnerability to some sexually transmitted infections.
Mining cancer data for treatment clues
Genomics -- the branch of molecular biology concerned with the structure, function, evolution, and mapping of genomes -- has proved successful in uncovering the complex nature of cancer.
Study doesn't support theory red and eastern wolves are recent hybrids, researchers argue
A University of Idaho-led research team is calling into question a 2016 study that concluded eastern and red wolves are not distinct species, but rather recent hybrids of gray wolves and coyotes.
Gene therapy leads to long-term benefits in dog model of devastating childhood disease
Researchers who previously showed that a gene therapy treatment could save the lives of dogs with a deadly disease called myotubular myopathy -- a type of muscular dystrophy that affects the skeletal muscles -- have found that the therapy is long-lasting.
Review of appendix cancer cases finds over diagnosis
Lesions of the appendix are being over diagnosed as invasive cancer, report University of California San Diego School of Medicine researchers in a paper published June 7 in the journal PLOS ONE.
The hidden order in DNA diffusion
The movement of DNA molecules seemingly explained by random motion conceals a more orderly march.
How can you tell deep-sea octopuses apart? Check their warts
Until now, there'd been no rigorous framework for telling apart two species of deep-sea octopuses -- they're both pink and warty.
First dual-targeting nanoparticles lower cancer's defenses and attack tumors
Cancer immunotherapy has emerged as one of the most exciting directions in cancer treatment.
Acacias are invading unaltered areas in the northwest of the peninsula
The legume Acacia dealbata, also known as mimosa, is one of the most aggressive invasive tree species in the world.
Scientists discover a 2-D magnet
A team led by the University of Washington and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology has for the first time discovered magnetism in the 2-D world of monolayers, or materials that are formed by a single atomic layer.
A more sustainable way to refine metals
A team of chemists in Canada has developed a way to process metals without using toxic solvents and reagents.
Nanowires, the future of electronics
The current demand for small-sized electronic devices is calling for fresh approaches in their design.
Observation of skyrmion breathing motion with X-ray technique
DGIST-KIST collaborative research team identified the breathing movement of skyrmion, which up to now had only been theoretical.
Biology professor uses microphones to track pollinating bees in new study
Webster University Biology Professor Nicole Miller-Struttman led a team of researchers that used microphones and iPad Minis to accurately track pollinating bees in three Colorado fields.
Scientists make biodegradable microbeads from cellulose
On World Ocean Day (8 June), researchers from the University of Bath announce they have developed biodegradable cellulose microbeads from a sustainable source that could potentially replace harmful plastic ones that contribute to ocean pollution.
Innovative therapy strategy for pancreatic cancer uses engineered exosomes targeting mutated KRAS gene
Genetic manipulation of exosomes, virus-sized particles released by all cells, may offer a new therapeutic approach to treating pancreatic cancer, according to a study at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center.
Don't rely on smartphone apps to treat back pain
University of Sydney researchers have found that smartphone apps for treating back pain have questionable value as they are generally of poor quality, and have not been rigorously evaluated.
How cells divide tasks and conquer work
Despite advances in neuroscience, the brain is still very much a black box -- no one even knows how many different types of neurons exist.
Clinical efficacy & future development of continuous glucose monitoring highlighted in DTT
A growing body of data from clinical studies of continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) in type 1 diabetes supports the value of CGM for reducing variability in blood glucose levels and the risks of both hypo- and hyperglycemia, and for improving patient quality of life compared to self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG).
Study finds youth football players have significant differences in head impact exposure
A study of 97 youth football players ages 9-13 years who participated in different age- and weight- based levels over four seasons of play found that that youngsters experienced a total of 40,538 head impacts.
Fake online profiles easier to fish out with new software tool
People who use fake profiles online could be more easily identified, thanks to a new tool developed by computer scientists.
Researchers shed light on how our eyes process visual cues
The mystery of how human eyes compute the direction of moving light has been made clearer by scientists at The University of Queensland.
Women with past adverse childhood experiences more likely to have ovaries removed, study shows
Mayo Clinic researchers report that women who suffered adverse childhood experiences or abuse as an adult are 62 percent more likely to have their ovaries removed before age 46.
Home-based HPV tests may help with cervical cancer screening
A new study found that for many women in rural El Salvador, home-based HPV self-sampling for women is an acceptable way to participate in a cervical cancer screening program.
Higher alcohol consumption leads to greater loss of muscle tissue in postmenopausal women
Both aging and menopause are known to affect sarcopenia, which is a loss of muscle mass and strength, which in turn affects balance, gait, and overall ability to perform tasks of daily living.
Einstein's 'impossible hope' comes true: Weighing a star with gravity
A little more than 100 years after Einstein developed his theory of general relativity, researchers have used its laws to observe something the iconic scientist claimed, in a 1936 Science paper, 'there [was] no hope of observing ... directly.'
Pregnant women could get on their bikes and stay healthy with better support
Medical advice from risk-averse health professionals may contribute to some women's decisions to stop cycling to work during pregnancy, meaning they miss out on the potential benefits of the active commute.
Natural capital: Holistic management makes ecosystems healthier, people wealthier
A Yale-led study puts a price on ecosystems by recognizing the value of a 'natural capital' asset -- in this case, fish in the Baltic Sea -- and connecting it with holistic ecosystem management to calculate asset values for the interacting parts of an ecosystem.
Florida researchers identify protein target to halt citrus tree disease
University of Florida researchers may have come a step closer to finding a treatment for a disease called Huanglongbing, or citrus greening, that has been decimating citrus trees in the state.

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