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Science Current Events and Science News | Brightsurf | June 12, 2017


Healthy diet? That depends on your genes
A recently published Cornell University study describes how shifts in the diets of Europeans after the introduction of farming 10,000 years ago led to genetic adaptations that favored the dietary trends of the time.
Spouses' daily responses to partners' pain linked with later functioning
The dynamics of spouses' daily interactions may influence whether an ill partner's physical functioning improves over time, according to new findings published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science.
Genetic differences across species guide vocal learning in juvenile songbirds
Juvenile birds discriminate and selectively learn their own species' songs even when primarily exposed to the songs of other species, but the underlying mechanism has remained unknown.
Promiscuous salamander found to use genes from three partners equally
A study shows that a unique all-female lineage of salamander equally balances genes from the males of three other salamander species.
Peatlands, already dwindling, could face further losses
Tropical peatlands have been disappearing fast due to clear-cutting and drainage projects.
Detailed new genome for maize shows the plant has deep resources for continued adaptation
A much more detailed reference genome for maize is published in Nature today.
Concentration spans drop when online ads pop up
Two Polish researchers have shown that measurements of the brain's electrical activity can be used to test the influence of intrusive online advertisements on internet users' concentration and emotions.
Musical mystery: Researchers examine science behind performer movements
Researchers at McMaster are one step closer to solving one of the mysteries of social interaction: how musicians communicate during a performance and anticipate one another's moves without saying a word.
Scientists unravel the interdecadal variability of the Afro-Asian summer monsoon system
Prof. Yihui Ding from the National Climate Center, China, along with his collaborators, have concluded that the Afro-Asian summer monsoon will continue to enhance and move northwards following the initial stage of the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO) warm phase since the mid-1990s.
Researchers find cellular sweet spot in skin-cancer battle
A team of researchers has pinpointed a sugar modification in cells that spurs the spread of skin cancer.
Ontarians still skeptical of flu shot
Half of all people who avoid the flu shot do so because they question its importance and effectiveness, a new study from the University of Waterloo reports.
Do mast cells contribute to more severe disease in dengue infection?
Why mosquito-borne dengue virus causes more severe disease in some individuals, including hemorrhagic fever with or without shock, remains controversial and researchers are focusing on the factors related to the interaction between the virus and the host immune system, including the role of mast cells.
Acting and thinking -- are they the same for our brain?
Neuroscientists from UNIGE and the HUG have recently put forward an original hypothesis -- all these cognitive functions rely on one central function: emulation.
Scientists make first crystal model of under-diagnosed autoimmune disease
Doctors are limited in how they can treat patients with myasthenia gravis, an autoimmune disease, to just treating its symptoms.
New carbon nitride material coupled with ruthenium enhances visible-light CO2 reduction in water
The research group at Tokyo Institute of Technology has found a hybrid photocatalyst exhibits specifically high activity for the reductive conversion reaction of carbon dioxide (CO2) to formic acid under visible light irradiation.
Microbes give meerkat gangs their signature scents
Body odor. To some it's an embarrassing nuisance. But to meerkats, it's a calling card.
Insomnia genes found
An international team of researchers has found, for the first time, seven risk genes for insomnia.
Status epilepticus: An overview
Seizures can be divided into three major groups: focal, generalised and unknown.
New study finds more than 2 billion people overweight or obese
Globally, more than 2 billion children and adults suffer from health problems related to being overweight or obese, and an increasing percentage of people die from these health conditions, according to a new study.
Islands and coastal regions are threatened the most
The distribution of established alien species in different regions of the world varies significantly.
Granular material conductivity increases in mysterious ways under pressure
In a recent study published in EPJ E, a French team of physicists made systematic measurements of the electrical resistance -- which is inversely related to conductivity -- of metallic, oxidized granular materials in a single 1-D layer and in 3-D, under compression.
E-cigarettes less addictive than cigarettes, PATH study shows
People who regularly use electronic cigarettes are less dependent on their product than those who regularly use traditional cigarettes, according to Penn State College of Medicine researchers.
Long after 1980s farm crisis, farmers still take own lives at a high rate
The number of suicides among farmers and farmworkers in the United States has remained stubbornly high since the end of the 1980s farm crisis, much higher than workers in many other industries, according to a new study from the University of Iowa.
Can't shake old ideas? Wash them off, suggests new study
Handwipes aren't just for germs anymore. Their uses may extend to more flexible thinking and reorienting one's priorities.
Mass. General report outlines strategies to address racial, ethnic health care disparities
An analysis of survey data from participants in the Massachusetts General Hospital-based Disparities Leadership Program -- a yearlong executive education initiative designed to help health care leaders address racial and ethnic disparities in health care services -- has identified five important strategies that helped participants implement successful projects for their institutions.
Low levels of vitamin A may fuel TB risk
People with low levels of vitamin A living with individuals sick with tuberculosis may be 10 times more likely to develop the disease than people with high levels of the nutrient, according to research led by investigators at Harvard Medical School.
ASTRO issues guideline for use of stereotactic radiation in early-stage lung cancer
The American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) issued a new clinical guideline for the use of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) in early-stage lung cancer today.
Can a single exercise session benefit your brain?
In a new review of the effects of acute exercise published in Brain Plasticity, researchers not only summarize the behavioral and cognitive effects of a single bout of exercise, but also summarize data from a large number of neurophysiological and neurochemical studies in both humans and animals showing the wide range of brain changes that result from a single session of physical exercise (i.e., acute exercise).
Common autism symptom observed in mice
New research in The Journal of Neuroscience finds that a common symptom of autism spectrum disorder and fragile X syndrome (FXS) -- overreaction to touch early in life that persists through adulthood -- is present in a mouse model of FXS.
AI that can shoot down fighter planes helps treat bipolar disorder
The artificial intelligence that can blow human pilots out of the sky in air-to-air combat accurately predicted treatment outcomes for bipolar disorder, according to a new medical study by the University of Cincinnati.
Researchers find glass eels use internal compass to find their way home
Scientists are closer to unraveling the long-standing mystery of how tiny glass eel larvae, which begin their lives as hatchlings in the Sargasso Sea, know when and where to 'hop off' the Gulf Stream toward European coastlines to live out their adult lives in coastal estuaries.
A plant-based diet boosts weight loss twice as effectively as a traditional diabetes diet
Hana Kahleova, M.D., Ph.D., presented 'The effect of a vegetarian versus conventional hypocaloric diabetic diet on thigh adipose tissue distribution in patients with type 2 diabetes,' at the American Diabetes Association's 77th Scientific Sessions in San Diego on June 12, 2017.
Winning climate strategy demands details
Scientists at Michigan State University (MSU) show that examining the daily minutia of climate, not just temperature, but also sunshine, precipitation and soil moisture simultaneously all over a country gives a better understanding of how variable a land's climate can be.
Is educational attainment associated with lifetime risk of cardiovascular disease?
Men and women with the lowest education level had higher lifetime risks of cardiovascular disease than those with the highest education level, according to a new study published by JAMA Internal Medicine.
Targeted radionuclide treatment for neuroendocrine tumors improves quality of life
Malignant neuroendocrine tumors, commonly called NETs, are easy to miss and associated with discouraging survival rates and poor quality of life.
Identifying underlying causes of immune deficiencies that increase shingles risk
Varicella zoster virus can remain dormant for decades and reactivate to cause shingles.
NUS study: Older adults are good Samaritans to strangers
A study by researchers from the National University of Singapore showed that while older adults treat their kin and friends the same as younger adults do, the elderly donate more to strangers than younger adults, even when their generosity is unlikely to be reciprocated.
Scientists develop computer-guided strategy to accelerate materials discovery
Researchers at the University of Liverpool have developed a computer-guided strategy that led to the discovery of two new materials in the laboratory.
Using enticing food labeling to make vegetables more appealing
Does labeling carrots as 'twisted citrus-glazed carrots' or green beans as 'sweet sizzilin' green beans and crispy shallots' make them more enticing and increase vegetable consumption?
Epigenetic signaling axis regulates proliferation and self-renewal of neural stem/progenitor cells
In a recent study published in Stem Cell Reports, a team led by Drs.
Uncovered: 1,000 new microbial genomes
US Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute scientists have taken a decisive step forward in uncovering the planet's microbial diversity.
Western diet increases Alzheimer's pathology in genetically predisposed mice
Obese mice with a particular version of a gene strongly associated with Alzheimer's disease in humans show increased Alzheimer's pathology, according to new research published in eNeuro.
Smeal research helps assess humanitarian response capacity in disasters
Immediately following a natural disaster that outpaces a community's ability to respond, various outside organizations rush to provide life-saving commodities to meet health, water, food, shelter or other needs.
Uncovering the biology of a painful and disfiguring pediatric disease
The study reveals a major physiological function for the CMG2 gene and demonstrates its interaction with collagen VI.
inflammatory molecule essential to muscle regeneration in mice, Stanford researchers find
A molecule released as part of an inflammatory response after muscle injury or rigorous exercise activates muscle stem cells responsible for repairing the damage, according to a study by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine.
Study: Underweight female runners more likely to get stress fractures
Female runners who are underweight have a higher risk for injury and take longer to heal according to a new study from The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center.
NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP Tropical Cyclone Merbok Nnaring Hong Kong
Tropical Storm Merbok formed in the South China Sea early on June 11 and NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed overhead as the storm moved toward China on June 12.
How do preemies perform in school?
Parents of prematurely born babies often fear their children may go on to struggle in school, but findings from a new large-scale study from the Institute for Policy Research at Northwestern University and Northwestern Medicine should reassure parents.
Immune profiling leads to implications for immunotherapy for NF1-associated tumors
Recently a team in the Center for Childhood Cancer and Blood Diseases in The Research Institute at Nationwide Children's Hospital led a study published in Oncotarget that further seeks to define the immunogenic profiles of NF1-associated tumors in the hopes of identifying targeted immunotherapy options.
Pregnancy problems not necessarily tied to Zika viral load or Dengue fever
Researchers have found that Zika viral load and the degree of Zika symptoms during pregnancy were not necessarily associated with problems during pregnancy or fetal abnormalities at birth.
Sexual stereotypes can lead to unhealthy sexual relationships
Female college students who believe women are subservient and who endorse music media's degradation of women are more likely to be involved in an unhealthy sexual relationship, according to research from Washington State University's Murrow Center for Media & Health Promotion Research.
Combining radionuclide therapy with a PARP inhibitor slows neuroendocrine tumor growth
Patients with neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) may experience fewer symptoms and survive longer by undergoing peptide-receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) combined with a drug that makes tumor cells more sensitive to radiation therapy, say researchers presenting at the 2017 Annual Meeting of the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging (SNMMI).
Evaluating greenhouse gas emissions in an irrigated cropping system
New, enhanced-efficiency fertilizer can reduce N2O emissions from irrigated cropping systems.
A single molecule is missing and the cell world is empty
Many diseases are related to defective cell division; cancer is one of them.
Study shows drug lowers levels of biomarker linked to ALS
A study conducted by researchers at Hospital for Special Surgery and other centers, and published online in the Annals of Neurology, finds that a decades-old drug used to treat malaria lowers levels of a biomarker linked to the inherited form of ALS.
Major study heralds new era in treatment of type 2 diabetes
A drug that lowers blood sugar levels for people with type 2 diabetes has also been revealed to significantly reduce the risk of both cardiovascular and kidney disease.
Chemicals used to combat Zika, agricultural pests impact motor skills in infants
A chemical currently being used to ward off mosquitoes carrying the Zika virus and a commonly used insecticide that was threatened with a ban in the United States have been associated with reduced motor function in Chinese infants, a University of Michigan study found.
CT angiography appears better at predicting future risk for patients with chest pain
An analysis of diagnostic test results from a trial comparing anatomic with functional testing as an initial diagnostic strategy for patients with chest pain found that CT angiography better predicted the risk for future cardiac events than did measures of exercise tolerance or restricted blood flow to the heart muscle.
Screening for genetic diseases & chromosomal defects with a single biopsy improves pregnancy rates
Couples who are undergoing pre-implantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) in order to avoid transmission of inherited diseases, such as Duchenne muscular dystrophy or cystic fibrosis, should also have their embryos screened for abnormal numbers of chromosomes at the same time, according to research published in Human Reproduction journal.
Global hotspots of established alien plants and animals revealed
Islands and mainland coastal regions are the world's hotspots for alien plant and animal species, according to new research.
Better outcome measures needed for clinical trials for Fragile X Syndrome
A group of researchers from several institutions in the USA, including Johns Hopkins Medicine, reports that its review of 22 clinical trials of fragile X syndrome (FXS) suggests the need for a wider use of newer and improved treatment outcome measurement tools for this and other several neurodevelopmental disorders.
New computing system takes its cues from human brain
A team of researchers at Georgia Institute of Technology and University of Notre Dame has created a new computing system that aims to tackle one of computing's hardest problems in a fraction of the time.
Irregular sleeping patterns linked to poorer academic performance in college students
In a new study at Brigham and Women's Hospital, researchers objectively measured sleep and circadian rhythms, and the association to academic performance in college students, finding that irregular patterns of sleep and wakefulness correlated with lower grade point average, delayed sleep/wake timing, and delayed release of the sleep-promoting hormone melatonin.
Vaping cannabis may expose users to carcinogenic compounds
New research shows that the agents commonly mixed with cannabis oil for vaping can also produce cancer-causing compounds when heated.
Late-nesting birds and bees face habitat threat
Bird and bumblebee species that nest late in the year are suffering more from the destruction of habitats, new research suggests.
Epigenetic changes at birth could explain later behavior problems
Epigenetic changes present at birth -- in genes related to addiction and aggression -- could be linked to conduct problems in children, according to a new study by King's College London and the University of Bristol.
Study: Use of prefabricated blood vessels may revolutionize root canals
Researchers at OHSU in Portland, Oregon, have developed a process by which they can engineer new blood vessels in teeth, creating better long-term outcomes for root canal patients and clinicians.
Zig-zagging device focuses high-energy radiation emissions
Equipment used in cancer treatment requires a strong, monochromatic source of radiation to produce hard X-rays.
Vegetarian diets almost twice as effective in reducing body weight, study finds
Dieters who go vegetarian not only lose weight more effectively than those on conventional low-calorie diets but also improve their metabolism by reducing muscle fat, a new study published in the Journal of the American College of Nutrition has found.
Study identifies potential biomarker for Alzheimer's disease
In one of the largest studies to date to use metabolomics, the study of compounds that are created through various chemical reactions in the body, researchers have been able to identify new circulating compounds associated with the risk of developing dementia and Alzheimer's disease (AD).
Rattling DNA hustles transcribers to targets
'DNA is a bully.' That's how researcher Jeffrey Skolnick sums up the dominant power of DNA motion among the forces acting upon transcription factors as they move through DNA's winding thickets to their target sites.
Risk, benefit or cost: What stops patients from receiving a diagnostic test?
Michigan Medicine researchers sought to determine how much certain factors affect a patient's decision to have elective diagnostic tests in the emergency department.
Mysterious gene transcripts after cancer therapy
Drugs that are used in cancer therapy to erase epigenetic alterations in cancer cells simultaneously promote the production of countless mysterious gene transcripts, scientists from the German Cancer Research Center now report in Nature Genetics.
Common periodontal pathogen may interfere with conception in women
According to a recent study, a common periodontal pathogen may delay concepcion in young women.
Scientists propose method to help keep new grid components operational and safe
The power grid's physical components are continuously improving, while the software underlying the safe function of the upgraded grid isn't keeping up.
Personalized PRRT improves radiation delivery to neuroendocrine tumors
Neuroendocrine cancer is exceedingly difficult to manage and unlikely to be cured, but researchers intend to slow progression of these tumors and aid survival by personalizing patient dose of peptide-receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT), according to research presented at the 2017 Annual Meeting of the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging (SNMMI).
Where cigarette smoking's damage is done... down to your DNA
Scientists have known for decades that smoking cigarettes causes DNA damage, which leads to lung cancer.
Volcanic 'plumerang' could impact human health
A new study has found a previously undetected potential health risk from the high concentration of small particles found in a boomerang-like return of a volcanic plume.
Lab on a chip could monitor health, germs and pollutants
Imagine wearing a device that continuously analyzes your sweat or blood for different types of biomarkers, such as proteins that show you may have breast cancer or lung cancer.
Drug costs vary by more than 600% in study of 10 high-income countries
In a study of 10 high-income countries with universal health care, costs for prescription drugs in 6 of the largest categories of primary care medicines varied by more than 600%, according to research published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal).
Genetic testing can pick out men at increased risk of testicular cancer
Testing for large numbers of genetic changes can identify men with over a 10-fold increased risk of testicular cancer, a new study shows.
Licensing, motor vehicle crash risk among teens with ADHD
Adolescents with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are licensed to drive less often and, when this group is licensed, they have a greater risk of crashing, according to a new study published by JAMA Pediatrics.
Iqaluit could start running out of fresh water by 2024
Without action, the supply of fresh water in Iqaluit will begin to dwindle by 2024 due to climate change and increased demand, research led by York University has found.
Bats are the major reservoir of coronaviruses worldwide
Results of a five-year study in 20 countries on three continents have found that bats harbor a large diversity of coronaviruses (CoV), the family of viruses that cause severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS) and Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS).
UNC researchers lead clinical trial evaluating potential treatment for PPD
Researchers at the University of North Carolina School of Medicine announced the publication of results from a multi-site phase 2 clinical trial with brexanolone, an investigational medication, in the treatment of severe postpartum depression (PPD).
Blue Brain team discovers a multi-dimensional universe in brain networks
Using a sophisticated type of mathematics in a way that it has never been used before in neuroscience, a team from the Blue Brain Project has uncovered a universe of multi-dimensional geometrical structures and spaces within the networks of the brain.
Imaging helps to spot fake ancient daggers
Collectors have become increasingly interested in weapons from ancient Asia and the Middle East.
Research suggests Asian women less likely to receive timely follow-up after abnormal mammogram
Women with an abnormal mammogram result need follow-up tests to check whether the finding indicates breast cancer, which should be treated at the earliest possible stage.
Animal models can't 'tune out' stimuli, mimicking sensory hypersensitivity in humans
Mice genetically engineered to mimic a type of autism in humans, fragile X syndrome, are unable to adapt to, or tune out, repeated stimulation to their whiskers -- unlike ordinary mice.
Structural analysis of relevant drug targets for Alzheimer's disease
Alzheimer's Disease (AD) is classified as a neurodegenerative non-curable disease that affects millions worldwide.
Study: Floodplain farm fields benefit juvenile salmon
Central Valley rice fields managed as floodplains during the winter can create surrogate wetland habitat for native fish, study shows.
More scientific productivity despite scarcity of resources in Spanish university R&D&i
Spanish universities have increased their scientific productivity, visibility and the number of patents granted despite the loss of human and material resources in recent years.
Technology unlocks mold genomes for new drugs
Fungi are rich sources of natural molecules for drug discovery, but numerous challenges have pushed pharmaceutical companies away from tapping into this bounty.
ALMA hears birth cry of a massive baby star
An international research team led by a Japanese astronomer has determined how the enigmatic gas flow from a massive baby star is launched.
Study sheds new light on inherited testicular cancer risk
An analysis of data from five major studies of testicular cancer has identified new genetic locations that could be susceptible to inherited testicular germ cell tumors.
Mixing booze and pot is a serious threat to traffic safety
Use of marijuana in combination with alcohol by drivers is especially dangerous, according to a latest study conducted at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health.
Poor diet, plus Alzheimer's gene, may fuel disease
USC researchers suggest the issue deserves further study since they found mice carrying a genetic risk factor for the disease quickly developed brain plaques after 12 weeks on a poor diet.
Study: New approach to destroying deadly brain tumors
A new strategy for treating brain tumors may extend or save the lives of patients diagnosed with one of the deadliest forms of cancer, according to a study from UT Southwestern Medical Center.
Oral communication provides better outcomes for children with cochlear implants
In a new, multisite study of deaf children with cochlear implants, UT Dallas researchers have found that children with either no exposure or limited exposure to sign language end up with better auditory, speaking and reading skills later.
New research finds CEOs who appear on CNBC can see their pay rise over $200,000 per year
New research that examined 4,452 CEOs from 2,666 US firms, as well as 104,129 news articles and 6,567 CNBC interviews, found that CEOs who appeared in CNBC interviews could expect their compensation to increase by $210,239 on average, notwithstanding firm performance and other mitigating factors.
Penn Professor refutes groupthink, proving that wisdom of crowds can prevail
According to a new study by University of Pennsylvania researchers, contrary to the classic notion of 'groupthink,' a group of people with equal influence in a network can arrive at a better prediction than a group with a single influential leader.
Drug developed for arthritis could be first to stop heart valve calcification
About a quarter of Americans suffer hardening of the valves by age 65, and the only treatment has been surgical replacement.
Motor vehicle crash risk for teens with ADHD much lower than previously reported
Adolescent drivers with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) have a 36 percent higher crash risk than other newly licensed teens.
How blows to the head cause numerous small swellings along the length of neuronal axons
Researchers from The Ohio State University have discovered how blows to the head cause numerous small swellings along the length of neuronal axons.
New cancer drug makes commonly prescribed chemo drug more effective when given together
Researchers have found a way to increase the effectiveness of a widely used cancer drug while decreasing the risk of heart-damaging side effects, according to a new study by researchers from The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston and Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center.
A way to objectively measure residents' surgical skills? No sweat
A recent study at the University of Missouri School of Medicine has shown that levels of perspiration can provide an objective evaluation of the surgical skills of resident physicians.
Chemists perform surgery on nanoparticles
A team of chemists led by Carnegie Mellon's Rongchao Jin has for the first time conducted site-specific surgery on a nanoparticle.
Bilingual children are better at recognizing voices
Bilingual children are better than their monolingual peers at perceiving information about who is talking, including recognizing voices, according to a study by NYU's Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development.
Traditional Chinese medicine may benefit some heart disease patients
Traditional Chinese medicine might be effective as a complement or alternative to traditional Western medicine for primary and secondary prevention of heart disease, according to a state of the art review paper published today in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.
NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP sees a disorganized Tropical Depression 3E
The third tropical cyclone of the Eastern Pacific Ocean hurricane season formed on Sunday, June 11 at 5 a.m.
Study reveals treatment gap in patients suffering from an irregular heartbeat
A study by the University of Birmingham has revealed a treatment gap in patients suffering from a heart condition that causes an irregular or abnormally fast heartbeat.
How bile duct cancer develops and how it can be prevented
What promotes the development of bile duct cancer in the liver?
Previously unpublished trial data explain effects and side effects of key MS drug
Through a Freedom of Information request to the European Medicines Agency, researchers from Queen Mary University of London (QMUL) gained access to the phase III trial datasets of Alemtuzumab, and publish new insights (JAMA Neurology) into the drastic response of the immune system in patients with MS.
Learning with light: New system allows optical 'deep learning'
A team of researchers at MIT and elsewhere has come up with a new approach to complex computations, using light instead of electricity.
Researchers find a surprise just beneath the surface in carbon dioxide experiment
When a carbon dioxide experiment didn't match with what theorists predicted, researchers went back to the drawing board and discovered something new.
Regenerating damaged nerves with 'Pac-Man' cells
A regenerative medicine approach to nerve damage may avoid the downsides of nerve graft surgery.
E-cigarettes potentially as harmful as tobacco cigarettes, UConn study shows
UConn study shows nicotine-based e-cigarettes are potentially as harmful as unfiltered cigarettes when it comes to causing DNA damage.
Moffitt researchers identify inhibitor that overcomes drug resistance in prostate cancer
In a study published today in Cancer Cell, Moffitt Cancer Center researchers report that a newly discovered epigenetic mechanism can lead to the development of castration-resistant prostate cancer.
Metastatic breast cancer cells use hedgehog to 'evilize' docile neighbors
A University of Colorado Cancer Center study published today in Nature Communications shows that metastatic breast cancer cells signal neighboring cells in ways that allow otherwise anchored cells to metastasize.
Socioeconomic background linked to reading improvement
MIT neuroscientists have found that dyslexic children from lower income families responded much better to a summer reading program than children from a higher socioeconomic background.
Burden of physical health conditions linked to increased risk of suicide
A new study in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine examines how illness plays a role in suicide risk.
Study discovers proteins which suppress the growth of breast cancer tumors
Researchers at the University of Birmingham have found that a type of protein could hold the secret to suppressing the growth of breast cancer tumors.
Artificial cartilage under tension as strong as natural material
Biomedical engineers at the University of California, Davis, have created a lab-grown tissue similar to natural cartilage by giving it a bit of a stretch.

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