Nav: Home

Science Current Events and Science News | Brightsurf | June 15, 2017


Diets rich in polyunsaturated fats may alter appetite hormones among millennials
New published research shows millennials (ages 18-35) who regularly consume foods that contain polyunsaturated fats, such as walnuts, salmon and canola oil, may experience favorable changes in appetite hormones associated with hunger and satiety.
Sex-specific cardiovascular drug dosages needed to reduce adverse reactions in women
Sex-specific cardiovascular drug dosages are needed to reduce adverse reactions in women, according to a position paper from the European Society of Cardiology published today in the June issue of European Heart Journal - Cardiovascular Pharmacotherapy.
Low-dose CT scanning improves assessment of ankylosing spondylitis patients
The results of a study presented today at the Annual European Congress of Rheumatology 2017 showed that low dose computed tomography is more sensitive than conventional radiographs (X-rays) in the monitoring of disease progression in patients with Ankylosing Spondylitis (AS).
A rusty and sweet side of sepsis
A research team led by Miguel Soares at the Instituto Gulbenkian de Ciência (IGC) in Portugal discovered an unsuspected mechanism that is protective against sepsis.
8 in 10 Indonesian children has been infected with dengue
Indonesia has one of the highest burdens of dengue fever, a mosquito-borne virus, in the world, and children account for many cases.
Cytokine profile differentiating Old World and New World hantaviral infections
Hantavirus infection is acute zoonosis clinically manifesting in two forms: Hemorrhagic Fever with Renal Syndrome (HFRS), caused by Old World hantaviruses, and Hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS), caused by New World hantaviruses.
How to educate future therapists more effectively
In the classroom, what's the line between education and personal experience?
Fred Hutch study suggests NSAIDs improve survival for certain colorectal cancer patients
Among long-term colorectal cancer survivors, use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, or NSAIDs, is associated with about a 25 percent reduction in all-cause mortality, according to new research from Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center.
Cardiac stem cells from heart disease patients may be harmful
A new Tel Aviv University study finds that stem cell therapy may harm heart disease patients.
Slow earthquakes in ocean subduction zones shed light on tsunami risk
Understanding 'slow-slip' earthquakes on the seafloor -- seismic events that occur over a period of days or weeks -- is giving researchers new insights into undersea earthquakes and the subsequent creation of tsunamis.
Horse, rhythm-and-music therapies may boost recovery after stroke
Horseback riding and rhythm-and-music therapies may improve balance, gait, cognition and long-term perception of recovery for stroke survivor's years after their stroke.
Gender, race & class: Language change in post-apartheid South Africa
A new study of language and social change in post-apartheid South Africa demonstrates that gender is a more powerful determinant than class among black university students.
Animal evolution: Hot start, followed by cold shock
The initial phases of animal evolution proceeded faster than hitherto supposed: New analyses suggest that the first animal phyla emerged in rapid succession -- prior to the global Ice Age that set in around 700 million years ago.
Face recognition system 'K-Eye' presented by KAIST
A research team led by Professor Hoi-Jun Yoo of the Department of Electrical Engineering has developed a semiconductor chip, CNNP (CNN Processor), that runs AI algorithms with ultra-low power, and K-Eye, a face recognition system using CNNP.
New screening tool helps ID heart surgery patients at risk of malnutrition
Patients who are at risk for malnutrition when undergoing heart surgery now can be more quickly and easily identified, leading to intervention and potentially better surgical outcomes, according to a study published online today in The Annals of Thoracic Surgery.
'Magic' alloy could spur next generation of solar cells
In what could be a major step forward for a new generation of solar cells called 'concentrator photovoltaics,' University of Michigan researchers have developed a new semiconductor alloy that can capture the near-infrared light located on the leading edge of the visible light spectrum.
Modeling the brain with 'Lego bricks'
Researchers from the University of Luxembourg, in cooperation with the University of Strasbourg, have developed a computational method that could be used to guide surgeons during brain surgery.
Scientists reveal mechanism behind mosquito-borne-disease 'blocker' used to fight viruses
A new study from Indiana University may explain how a bacterium called Wolbachia prevents mosquitoes from transmitting deadly diseases such as dengue fever, West Nile virus and Zika.
Early stress confers lifelong vulnerability causing alterations in a specific brain region
Mount Sinai study establishes mechanism by which an early window of exposure defines the response to stress in adulthood.
Scientists report large-scale surface melting event in Antarctica during 2015-16 El Niño
The West Antarctic Ice Sheet, a landbound mass of ice larger than Mexico, experienced substantial surface melt through the austral summer of 2015-2016 during one of the largest El Niño events of the past 50 years, according to scientists who had been conducting the first comprehensive atmospheric measurements in the region since the 1960s.
Research on crucial cutting enzyme maps sites of DNA damage in leukemias and other cancers
Researchers studying a DNA-cutting enzyme with a crucial role in regulating the structure of genes have discovered a broad role for its cutting activity in driving abnormal genetic rearrangements called translocations that cause cancer, including leukemias and solid tumors.
Cognitive behavior therapy significantly reduced depression and anxiety in chronic pain patients
The results of a study presented today at the Annual European Congress of Rheumatology 2017 has shown that Acceptance and Commitment Therapy, a form of cognitive behavioral therapy that focuses on psychological flexibility and behavior change, provided a significant reduction in self-reported depression and anxiety among patients participating in a pain rehabilitation program.
Holes drilled in shells point to bigger predators picking on small prey
The drill holes left in fossil shells by hunters such as snails and slugs show marine predators have grown steadily bigger and more powerful over time but stuck to picking off small prey, rather than using their added heft to pursue larger quarry, new research shows.
Japanese slow earthquakes could shed light on tsunami generation
Understanding slow-slip earthquakes in subduction zone areas may help researchers understand large earthquakes and the creation of tsunamis, according to an international team of researchers that used data from instruments placed on the seafloor and in boreholes east of the Japanese coast.
Special efforts are needed to address trauma in refugee youth
In a study of children and adolescents referred for mental health services at US trauma treatment sites, there were important differences in the experiences of refugee youth who were displaced by war-related violence relative to immigrants and those born in the United States.
Volcanic crystals give a new view of magma
Volcanologists are gaining a new understanding of what's going on inside the magma reservoir that lies below an active volcano and they're finding a colder, more solid place than previously thought, according to new research published June 16 in the journal Science.
Seasonal rain and snow trigger small earthquakes on California faults
California's earthquake faults continually accumulate stress until they fail in an earthquake.
FDA rule improves labeling of medications used during pregnancy and lactation
The new US Food and Drug Administration's (FDA's) Pregnancy and Lactation Labeling Rule should help healthcare providers better explain to pregnant and breastfeeding patients the benefits and risks of taking a specific medication.
In California, large-scale water cycles impact quakes a little
In California, seasonal changes in large-scale water cycles modestly influence small-scale quake activity, a new study reports.
Drill holes in fossil shells point to bigger predators picking on small prey
The drill holes left in fossil shells by hunters such as snails and slugs show marine predators have grown steadily bigger and more powerful over time but stuck to picking off small prey, rather than using their added heft to pursue larger quarry, new research shows.
Giving children a voice in clinical trials
Children as young as 8 years old with incurable cancer can reliably characterize the impact an experimental therapy has on their symptoms and quality of life -- even at the earliest stages of drug development -- making self-reported patient outcomes a potential new clinical trial endpoint.
College attendance drops after widespread job loss
When states suffer widespread job loss, the damage extends to the next generation, where college attendance drops among poor students, says new research from Duke University.
Southern California mountain lions' genetic connectivity dangerously low
Mountain lions in the Santa Ana mountains have lowest genetic diversity ever reported for pumas besides the Florida panther.
Rates of marijuana use, heavy use, and cannabis use disorder depend on where you live
Adult marijuana use rose significantly in states that passed loosely regulated medical marijuana laws (MMLs) according to a new study by Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health and Columbia University Medical Center.
Celebrating a high performing new journal in quantum information
UNSW Sydney is proud of the early publication performance, influence and reach of its Nature Partner Journal npj Quantum Information, from advancing discovery to affecting public discourse.
Water management interventions push scarcity downstream
Human interventions to harness water resources, such as reservoirs, dams, and irrigation measures, have increased water availability for much of the global population, but at the same time, swept water scarcity problems downstream.
Science shows how faces guide, and reflect, our social lives
A special issue of Current Directions in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science, brings together innovative research and theory in psychological science, computer science, neuroscience, and related fields, illuminating the myriad ways in which face perception infuses how we think and behave.
New genetic technique could help identify potential drug targets for malaria
Scientists have developed a new technique for investigating the effects of gene deletion at later stages in the life cycle of a parasite that causes malaria in rodents, according to a new study in PLOS Pathogens.
Vaccination: Main prevention measure to address hepatitis A outbreaks among MSM
1 173 confirmed hepatitis A cases have been reported across 15 EU countries since June 2016.
Radio astronomers peer deep into the stellar nursery of the Orion Nebula
Astronomers have released an image of a 50-light-year-long filament of star-forming gas, 1200 light-years away, in the stellar nursery of the Orion Nebula.
Widespread snowmelt in West Antarctica during unusually warm summer
An area of West Antarctica more than twice the size of California partially melted in 2016 when warm winds forced by an especially strong El Nino blew over the continent.
Persistent pain shows up inefficiency of current psoriatic arthritis (PsA) treatment
The results of two studies presented today at the Annual European Congress of Rheumatology 2017 press conference have highlighted limitations in the current treatment of patients with Psoriatic Arthritis (PsA).
Hi-res view of protein complex shows how it breaks up protein tangles
A new, high-resolution view of the structure of Hsp104 (heat shock protein 104), a natural yeast protein nanomachine with six subunits, may show news ways to dismantle harmful protein clumps in disease.
Tracking the build-up to volcanic eruptions
ASU scientists discover that sub-millimeter zircon crystals record the flash heating of molten rock leading up to an explosive eruption 700 years ago.
New blood test detects stroke and heart attack risk in lupus patients with no CVD symptoms
The results of a study presented today at the Annual European Congress of Rheumatology 2017 press conference have shown that a specific biomarker detected in the blood of lupus patients with no symptoms of cardiovascular disease (CVD), thought to be at low risk of CVD based on traditional risk factors, is associated with the presence of atherosclerosis.
Global diet and farming methods 'must change for environment's sake'
Reducing meat consumption and using more efficient farming methods globally are essential to stave off irreversible damage to the environmental, a new study says.
Breakthrough findings: Fetal immunity develops as early as 2nd trimester of pregnancy
Scientists from A*STAR's Singapore Immunology Network (SIgN) and KK Women's and Children's Hospital (KKH) in Singapore have discovered that a fetus's immune system is established as early as the second trimester of pregnancy, and may be able to initiate immune responses independently of the mother's immune system.
New tool measures resilience in adolescent Syrian refugees
Researchers from Yale University, together with partners at universities in Canada, Jordan, and the United Kingdom, have developed a brief and reliable survey tool to measure resilience in children and adolescents who have been displaced by the brutal conflict in Syria.
More brain activity is not always better when it comes to memory and attention
Potential new ways of understanding the cause of cognitive impairments, such as problems with memory and attention, in brain disorders including schizophrenia and Alzheimer's are under the spotlight in a new research review.
First few millimeters of the leaf margin identify palm species in a new key to Syagrus
An incredible amount of information is contained in the very first few millimeters of the leaflet margin of species in the Neotropical palm genus Syagrus.
Secret of why jewel scarab beetles look like pure gold, explained by physicists
The secrets of why central-American jewel scarab beetles look like they are made from pure gold, has been uncovered by physicists at the University of Exeter.
Video imaging of single molecule DNA replication
Almost all life on Earth is based on DNA being copied, or replicated.
Program developed to provide free hearing aids to low-income adults
An intervention at a free clinic that included comprehensive care for hearing was able to provide recycled, donated hearing aids to low-income adults, according to a study published by JAMA Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery.
Old school meets new school: Flight deck Ouija boards go digital
The Office of Naval Research's (ONR) TechSolutions program has sponsored the development of the Deployable Ship Integration Multitouch System -- DSIMS, for short -- to make the jobs of aircraft handlers easier.
Biological DMARD guidelines associated with a reduced need for knee and hip replacements in RA
The results of a Danish study presented today at the Annual European Congress of Rheumatology 2017 press conference showed that the incidence of total knee replacements carried out on patients with rheumatoid arthritis started to decrease after the introduction of biological Disease-Modifying Anti-Rheumatic Drugs (bDMARDs) to national treatment guidelines.
When healthy cells stimulate the migration of tumor cells
Estrogens act as a driving force of both healthy and cancerous mammary cell growth by binding to receptors that include GPER, which is generally located in cell membranes.
US is still first in science, but China rose fast as funding stalled here & elsewhere
American scientific teams still publish significantly more biomedical research discoveries than teams from any other country, a new study shows, and the US still leads the world in research and development expenditures.
*Ring, Ring* 'Earth? It's space calling, on the quantum line'
In a landmark study, Chinese scientists report the successful transmission of entangled photons between suborbital space and Earth.
Researchers discover new antibiotic effective against drug-resistant bacteria
A team of Rutgers University-New Brunswick, NAICONS Srl., and other scientists has discovered a new antibiotic effective against drug-resistant bacteria: pseudouridimycin.
Jerusalem tower younger than thought
Gihon Spring, was crucial to the survival of its inhabitants, and archaeologists had uncovered the remains of a massive stone tower built to guard this vital water supply.
Crystals once deep inside a volcano offer new view of magma, eruption timing
Volcanologists are gaining a better understanding of what's going on inside the magma reservoir that lies below New Zealand's Mount Tarawera volcano.
Elder abuse research yields new evidence on incidence, risks, outcomes
As World Elder Abuse Awareness Day is observed on June 15, new study data from the Chinese community in Chicago is shedding light on the impact of elder abuse in America.
Icy moons, galaxy clusters, and distant worlds selected targets for Webb Telescope
Mission officials for NASA's James Webb Space Telescope announced some of the science targets the telescope will observe following its launch and commissioning.
Newly discovered cellular pathway may lead to cancer therapies
Scientists have discovered a new cellular pathway that can promote and support the growth of cancer cells.
Nurses crucial in improving uptake of potentially life-saving vaccine in vulnerable RMD patients
The results of a study presented today at the Annual European Congress of Rheumatology 2017 press conference showed that implementing a vaccination program run by nursing staff dramatically improves pneumococcal vaccination coverage among vulnerable patients with chronic inflammatory rheumatic diseases.
3-D images show how sperm binds to the egg surface
Researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden have obtained the first 3-D snapshots of a sperm protein attached to a complementary egg coat protein at the beginning of fertilization.
An alternative hypothesis on the faunal colonization of the Himalayas?
Until now, the fauna of the Himalayas was considered to be an 'immigration fauna', with species that have immigrated primarily from neighboring regions to the west and east since the geological formation of this mountain range.
Smart materials used in ultrasound behave similar to water, Penn chemists report
Researchers at the University of Pennsylvania provided new insight into piezoelectrics materials, a smart material used in ultrasound technology.
Casualty care guidelines developed by the military are directly transferable to improve the practice of wilderness medicine
Many of the lessons learned on the battlefield translate well to the austere conditions encountered every day in the wilderness.
Penn engineers show key feature for modeling how cells spread in fibrous environments
Many studies have shown that stiffness of the extracellular matrix, the fibrous network of collagen that surrounds cells, promotes cellular mobility; cells can get a better grip on stiffer surfaces and thus invade neighboring tissue.
19-year-olds as sedentary as 60-year-olds, study suggests
Physical activity among children and teens is lower than previously thought, and, in another surprise finding, young adults after the age of 20 show the only increases in activity over the lifespan.
Scientists ID mutations that could allow bird flu strain to spread among humans
An international team of scientists has identified several genetic mutations that, should they arise, could potentially allow the avian influenza strain H7N9 to spread between humans.
Optimizing feeding is necessary to maintain milk production in organic herds
Currently, agriculture accounts for approximately 9% of total US greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions.
New flu test: One drop of blood could save your life
Dr Ben Tang and co-researchers have developed a world-first blood test to predict which flu patients will develop potentially life-threatening secondary infections that demand urgent medical treatment.
Taking circular economy to the next level
While principles of a circular economy have been adopted by businesses, governments and NGOs, leading researchers say it's time to take the discussion and analysis to the next level.
Gap in health care for Alzheimer´s disease patients who live alone
The patients who live alone do not receive the same extent of diagnostic investigations and anti-dementia treatment as those who are co-habiting.
How does a frog heal wounded skin without scarring?
When a Xenopus frog is deeply wounded, its skin can regenerate without scarring.
Replacing saturated fat with healthier fat may lower cholesterol as well as drugs
Scientific studies that lowered intake of saturated fat and replaced it with polyunsaturated vegetable oil reduced cardiovascular disease by approximately 30 percent; similar to cholesterol-lowering drugs, known as statins.
Study examines facial fractures from recreational activity in adults 55 and older
Aerobic activity and muscle-strengthening activities are encouraged for older adults but there are implications for injury patterns and prevention.
Cryo-EM images reveal how key biological machine unfolds problem proteins
Hand over hand. That's how new, near-atomic resolution, 3-D snapshots show that a key biological machine unfolds a ribbon of protein through its central channel.
Tumor PD-L2 expression may predict patient response to anti-PD-1 immunotherapy
PD-L2 protein expression in human tumors was associated with clinical response to pembrolizumab (Keytruda), an anti-PD-1 immunotherapy, independent of PD-L1 expression, in patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC).
High prevalence of CRE in Washington, D.C. healthcare facilities
Carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE), a family of highly pathogenic antibiotic-resistant organisms, are endemic across Washington, D.C. healthcare facilities, with 5.2 percent of inpatients testing positive for the bacteria, according to new research published online today in Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology, the journal of the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America.
Women who focus negatively, magnify chronic pain, more likely to be taking prescribed opioids
Female chronic pain sufferers who catastrophize, a psychological condition in which pain is exaggerated or irrationally focused on, not only report greater pain intensity, but are more likely to be taking prescribed opioids than men with the same condition, according to a study published Online First in Anesthesiology, the peer-reviewed medical journal of the American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA).
VHA initiative significantly reduces MRSA in veterans living centers
An initiative led by the Veterans Health Administration reduced methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infections by 89 percent over four years in a Veterans community living center in North Carolina, according to research presented at the 44th Annual Conference of the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology.
Raucous crystals
Some organic crystals jump around when heated up. This happens because of an extremely fast change in their crystal structure.
Satellite-based photon entanglement distributed over 1,200 kilometers
A team of Chinese scientists has realized the satellite-based distribution of entangled photon pairs over 1,200 km.
Egocentric hearing: Study clarifies how we can tell where a sound is coming from
A new UCL and University of Nottingham study has found that most neurons in the brain's auditory cortex detect where a sound is coming from relative to the head, but some are tuned to a sound source's actual position in the world.
Analysis sheds light on how metaphors like 'sheds light' evolved
In the first large-scale study of its kind, researchers from Lehigh University and University of California, Berkeley analyzed 5,000 English-language metaphorical mapping records over the last 1100 years and found the evolution of word meaning to be highly systematic -- following predictable patterns.
Researchers discover shortcut to satellite-based quantum encryption network
In a new study, researchers demonstrate ground-based measurements of quantum states sent by a laser aboard a satellite 38,000 kilometers above Earth.
Massachusetts General researchers explore why those with autism avoid eye contact
Individuals with autism spectrum disorder often find it difficult to look others in the eyes as they find eye contact uncomfortable or stressful.
Researchers call for better quality and consistency of electronic health record studies
We need improved quality of recording asthma diagnosis and events if the UK is to effectively use the very considerable potential locked within electronic health records to promote improvements in asthma care and catalyze research.
A more safe and efficient means for drug manufacturing
Scientists have developed a system that uses continuous flow technology, instead of a batch-by-batch approach, to produce pharmaceutical compounds, and they used it to manufacture a chemotherapy drug that's currently under evaluation in clinical trials.
Evidence lacking to estimate local government savings from California crime reform measure
When California voters passed a ballot initiative reducing penalties for some criminal offenses, it was supposed to save local governments money by reducing law enforcement costs.
Transgender actors effective in teaching new doctors to provide respectful care
By acting out scenarios commonly seen in the clinic, real-life transgender actors can help residents learn to provide more sensitive care to people with a different gender identity than the one they were assigned at birth.
Knowing HIV levels are 'undetectable' may affect sexual behavior
Understanding and responding to behavioral trends in groups that are at high risk for HIV infection is critical to the development of effective strategies that decrease HIV incidence and improve access to care.
Gut bacteria might one day help slow down aging process
Slowing down the aging process might be possible one day with supplements derived from gut bacteria.
A mechanical trigger for toxic tumor therapy
Cell-killing chemotherapies are designed to shrink cancerous tumors by accumulating in their ill-formed blood and lymph vessels, delivering a toxic dose to the cancer cells.
Penn/CHOP team gains insights into cause of infant and treatment-related leukemias
A joint effort by University of Pennsylvania and Children's Hospital of Philadelphia researchers has applied an innovative new genome sequencing technique to catalog the sites of DNA cleavage by the enzyme topoisomerase II, called TOP2.
Meditation and yoga can 'reverse' DNA reactions which cause stress, new study suggests
Mind-body interventions (MBIs) such as meditation, yoga and Tai Chi don't simply relax us; they can 'reverse' the molecular reactions in our DNA which cause ill-health and depression, according to a study by the universities of Coventry and Radboud.
Induced cell turnover: A proposed modality for in situ tissue regeneration & repair
Scientists at the Biogerontology Research Foundation, Feinberg School of Medicine at Northwestern University and Swammerdam Institute of Life Sciences at the University of Amsterdam have published a paper on a proposed method of in situ tissue regeneration called Induced Cell Turnover in the journal Human Gene Therapy.
Targeting immune cells that help tumors stay hidden could improve immunotherapy
Researchers at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine and UPMC have discovered a clue that could unlock the potential of immunotherapy drugs to successfully treat more cancers.
Newly identified method of gene regulation challenges accepted science, researchers say
Researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine have discovered an unexpected layer of the regulation of gene expression.
Marine predators: Bigger in size with an appetite to match
The size of marine invertebrate predators has increased over the past 500 million years, while the size of their prey has not, a new study reveals.
Forget the red hot blob: Volcanic zircon crystals give new view of magma
The classic red teardrop of magma underneath a volcano peak is too simplistic.
Inhibitor drug improves overall survival in older radioiodine resistant thyroid cancer
The drug lenvatinib can significantly improve overall survival rates in a group of thyroid cancer patients whose disease is resistant to standard radioiodine treatment, according to new research from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania.
Review: No definitive standard for identifying and treating veterans at risk for suicide
A systematic review of basic and clinical science research has revealed no definitive standard for detecting military veterans at risk of suicidal behavior, nor is there a clear standard of treatment to prevent suicide among US veterans.
The newly discovered Russian dinosaur named after Mongolian spirit
Being a member of the international scientific team, a student from the Faculty of Geology of the Lomonosov Moscow State University has taken part in study and description of a new genus and species of the ancient marine reptile, called pliosaur.
Bee antennae offer links between the evolution of social behavior and communication
As bees' social behavior evolved, their complex chemical communication systems evolved in concert, according to a study published online by the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
Development of low-dimensional nanomaterials could revolutionize future technologies
Javier Vela, scientist at the US Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory, believes improvements in computer processors, TV displays and solar cells will come from scientific advancements in the synthesis of low-dimensional nanomaterials.
Thermal history of magma may help scientists hone in on volcanic eruption forecasts
A new study analyzed crystals of the mineral zircon -- zirconium silicate -- in magma from an eruption in the Taupo Volcanic Zone in New Zealand about 700 years ago to determine the magma's history.
BfR Research: Proof of the transfer of aluminium from menu trays to food
Foods from uncoated aluminium trays can contain high levels of aluminium.
Dynamic DNA helps ward off gene damage, study reveals
Researchers have identified properties in DNA's protective structure that could transform the way scientists think about the human genome.
Electrolytes made from liquefied gas enable batteries to run at ultra-low temperatures
Engineers at the University of California San Diego have developed new electrolytes that enable lithium batteries to run at temperatures as low as -60 degrees Celsius with excellent performance -- in comparison, today's lithium-ion batteries stop working at -20 degrees Celsius.
Pre-clinical study suggests Parkinson's could start in gut endocrine cells
Duke University researchers have identified a potential new mechanism in both mice and human endocrine cells that populate the small intestines.

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Don't Fear Math
Why do many of us hate, even fear math? Why are we convinced we're bad at it? This hour, TED speakers explore the myths we tell ourselves and how changing our approach can unlock the beauty of math. Guests include budgeting specialist Phylecia Jones, mathematician and educator Dan Finkel, math teacher Eddie Woo, educator Masha Gershman, and radio personality and eternal math nerd Adam Spencer.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#518 With Genetic Knowledge Comes the Need for Counselling
This week we delve into genetic testing - for yourself and your future children. We speak with Jane Tiller, lawyer and genetic counsellor, about genetic tests that are available to the public, and what to do with the results of these tests. And we talk with Noam Shomron, associate professor at the Sackler School of Medicine at Tel Aviv University, about technological advancements his lab has made in the genetic testing of fetuses.