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Science Current Events and Science News | Brightsurf | June 21, 2017


Domestication genetics: The career of the cosmopolitan cat
A new study shows that modern domestic cats are ultimately derived from the African wildcat, which was domesticated in two centers -- Egypt and the Middle East.
Small rodent species may become endangered
A small rodent called the hazel dormouse (Muscardinus avellanarius) is a European Protected Species and is monitored by volunteers at sites in England and Wales for the National Dormouse Monitoring Programme.
Systems pharmacology modelers accelerate drug discovery in Alzheimer's
InSysBio scientific group led by Tatiana Karelina developed a quantitative system pharmacology model of Alzheimer's disease.
Researchers create a 'Rosetta Stone' to decode immune recognition
St. Jude Children's Research Hospital and Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center have developed an algorithm that predicts T cell recognition of antigens and sets the stage to more effectively harness the immune system
How did bird babysitting co-ops evolve?
It's easy to make up a story to explain an evolved trait; proving that's what happened is much harder.
The curious case of the warped Kuiper Belt
The plane of the solar system is warped in the belt's outer reaches, signaling the presence of an unknown Mars-to-Earth-mass planetary object far beyond Pluto, according to UA research. 
Strategic studying limits the costs of divided attention
Multitasking while studying may impair overall memory for the study material, but your ability to strategically identify and remember the most important information may stay intact, according to new findings published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science.
Head impact exposure increases as youth football players get older, bigger
Youth football players are exposed to more and more forceful head impacts as they move up in age- and weight-based levels of play, according to researchers at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center.
Researchers find new mechanism for genome regulation
The mechanisms that separate mixtures of oil and water may also help the organization of a part of our DNA called heterochromatin, according to a new Berkeley Lab study.
Analysis indicates that insurance expansion improves access to care, health, and survival
There is strong evidence that expanding health insurance increases access to care, improves health in a variety of ways, and reduces mortality, according to Harvard T.H.
Study examines opioid use in patients with rheumatoid arthritis
A new analysis indicates that the use of opioid pain medications in older US rheumatoid arthritis patients peaked in 2010 and is now declining slightly.
UTMB researchers shed new light on a key player in brain development
Researchers at The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston have shed light on how the developing brain ensures that connections between brain cells reach their intended destination but that they are also maintained during life-span.
Role aerosols play in climate change unlocked by spectacular Icelandic volcanic eruption
A spectacular six-month Icelandic lava field eruption could provide the crucial key for scientists to unlock the role aerosols play in climate change, through their interactions with clouds.
German cities traumatized in WWII show distinct psychological resilience today
German Angst is a term commonly used to characterize the perceived tendency of Germans to be pessimistic.
New flood study reveals America's most vulnerable communities
Floods are the natural disaster that kill the most people.
Could handheld electronic devices contribute to carpal tunnel syndrome?
In a study of 48 university students, intensive users of electronic devices reported more wrist/hand pain than non-intensive users.
Selfies: We love how we look and we're here to show you
Nearly 52 percent of all selfies fell into the appearance category: pictures of people showing off their make-up, clothes, lips, etc.
Behavior study shows piglets prefer new toys
We can't help but be tempted by new things. We see it in a child's eyes when she opens a new toy, and feel it every time a new version of the iPhone is released.
UTSA Center for Community and Business Research releases Eagle Ford Shale study
Commissioned by the South Texas Energy and Economic Roundtable (STEER), The University of Texas at San Antonio's (UTSA) Center for Community and Business Research (CCBR) completed the latest Eagle Ford Shale (EFS) study in June.
Urban agriculture only provides small environmental benefits in northeastern US
'Buy local' sounds like a great environmental slogan, epitomized for city dwellers by urban agriculture.
Study shows Neuro Kinetics' I-Portal® devices objectively track concussion signs
A new paper describes the objective and effective use of I-Portal® technology to test and monitor mTBI patients over time.
The world's largest canary
Biologists at Lund University, together with their colleagues from Portugal and the UK, have now proven that the endangered São Tomé grosbeak is the world's largest canary -- 50 percent larger than the runner-up.
Transportation noise increases risk for cardiovascular diseases and diabetes
Transportation noise increases risk for cardiovascular diseases and diabetes. This is shown by the first results of the SiRENE study under the lead of Swiss TPH, which was presented on 20 June 2017 in the framework of the ICBEN Congress (International Commission on Biological Effects of Noise) in Zurich.
Serotonin improves sociability in mouse model of autism
Scientists at the RIKEN Brain Science Institute in Japan have linked early serotonin deficiency to several symptoms that occur in autism spectrum disorder (ASD).
Reconstruction of ancient chromosomes offers insight into mammalian evolution
Researchers have gone back in time, at least virtually, computationally recreating the chromosomes of the first eutherian mammal, the long-extinct, shrewlike ancestor of all placental mammals.
New IST research leverages big data to predict severe weather
Every year, severe weather endangers millions of people and causes billions of dollars in damage worldwide.
HIV-positive women with cytomegalovirus likelier to pass virus that causes AIDS to infant
HIV-positive women with cytomegalovirus, or CMV, in their urine at the time of labor and delivery are more than five times likelier than HIV-positive women without CMV to transmit HIV, the virus that causes AIDS, to their infants.
Algae: The final frontier
Algae dominate the oceans that cover nearly three-quarters of our planet, and produce half of the oxygen that we breathe.
Yarraman flu or horse flu? Words and graphics influence willingness to vaccinate
'Yarraman flu is a virus quickly infecting the US...' The mock announcement was enough to make readers worry.
Marriage makes men fatter, shows new research
Being married makes men gain weight, and the early days of fatherhood add to the problem, finds new research from the University of Bath's School of Management.
New inhibitor drug shows promise in relapsed leukemia
A new drug shows promise in its ability to target one of the most common and sinister mutations of acute myeloid leukemia (AML), according to researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania and Penn's Abramson Cancer Center.
Molecular test for common causes of vaginitis receives FDA approval
Johns Hopkins researchers report that a molecular diagnostic test accurately distinguishes among the three most common causes of vaginitis, an inflammation of vaginal tissue they say accounts for millions of visits to medical clinics and offices in the US each year.
Trends in emergency room visits & costs for patients with shingles
Their study suggests that while emergency room visits for shingles has decreased for those vaccinated against either the chicken pox (18 to 19 years old) or the shingles (60 years and older), the patient population in-between (ages 20-59 years old) has experienced increased visits for the disease.
Ultra-thin camera creates images without lenses
Caltech engineers have built a camera that does not need lenses to focus light.
Could flu during pregnancy raise risk for autism?
Researchers at the Center for Infection and Immunity at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health found no evidence that laboratory-diagnosis alone of maternal influenza during pregnancy is associated with risk of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in the offspring.
Oral storytelling skills impact reading differently for African American boys and girls
The oral storytelling skills of African American preschoolers make a difference in how quickly their reading skills develop, according to a new study from the Frank Porter Graham Child Development Institute (FPG) at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.
Breast implants may impede ECG and lead to false heart attack diagnosis
Breast implants may impede an electrocardiogram (ECG) and could result in a false heart attack diagnosis, according to research presented today at EHRA EUROPACE -- CARDIOSTIM 2017.
What strategies help ethnic minority adolescents cope with racism?
A new study finds that maintaining a strong ethnic identity and high levels of social support can help Latino adolescents in the United States cope with racism.
Fossil holds new insights into how fish evolved onto land
The fossil of an early snake-like animal -- called Lethiscus stocki -- has kept its evolutionary secrets for the last 340-million years.
Common water treatments could damage DNA
Scientists are warning that a water treatment widely used in developing countries could be damaging the DNA of those drinking it.
A rhodium-based catalyst for making organosilicon using less precious metal
Researchers at Tokyo Institute of Technology have reported a new catalyst composed of silica, a rhodium complex and tertiary amines(term1) that significantly boosts hydrosilylation reactions.
Climate change label leads to climate science acceptance
A new Cornell University study finds that labels matter when it comes to acceptance of climate science.
Provider's preference for pain therapy can affect patient's results, UF researchers find
A health care provider's beliefs about a particular treatment may have a strong influence on the patient's outcome, according to a new University of Florida stuPdy that evaluated people undergoing treatment for short-term low back pain.
New antibody uses 1-2 punch to potentially treat blood cancers
Researchers have developed a two-pronged approach to blood cancer treatment: 1) attacking cancer cells directly and/or 2) driving them from the nurturing bone marrow environment into the peripheral blood streams, where they are more vulnerable (for example, to chemotherapy).
CPAP improves respiratory and survival rates in children in Ghana
A new study found that applying continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP), a form of non-invasive ventilation, decreased mortality in children with respiratory distress.
More frequent sexual activity can boost brain power in older adults, according to study
More frequent sexual activity has been linked to improved brain function in older adults, according to a study by the universities of Coventry and Oxford.
Bitter or sweet? How taste cells decide what they want to be
A new study from the Monell Center and collaborating institutions advances understanding of how stem cells on the tongue grow into the different types of mature taste cells that detect either sweet, salty, sour, bitter, or umami.
Pollinator extinctions alter structure of ecological networks
The absence of a single dominant bumblebee species from an ecosystem disrupts foraging patterns among a broad range of remaining pollinators in the system -- from other bees to butterflies, beetles and more, field experiments show.
Radioactive elements in Cassiopeia A suggest a neutrino-driven explosion
Using elaborate computer simulations, a team of researchers from RIKEN in Japan and the Max Planck Institute for Astrophysics (MPA) were able to explain the recently measured spatial distributions of radioactive titanium and nickel in Cassiopeia A, a roughly 340 year old gas remnant of a nearby supernova.
Biological fingerprint of tuberculosis meningitis discovered in children
Children with tuberculosis meningitis have a biological fingerprint that can be used to assess the severity of the condition, help decide the best course of treatment, and provide clues for novel treatments.
A new technique isolates neuronal activity during memory consolidation
A team belonging to the Spanish National Research Council (CSIC), have discovered some basic processes underlying memory consolidation.
CWRU researchers find a chemical solution to shrink digital data storage
Chemists at Case Western Reserve University found that commonly used polymer films containing two dyes can optically store data in a quaternary (four-symbol) code, potentially requiring about half as much space as binary code storage.
New study examines relationship between emotion regulation and brain connectivity in ASD
Emotional control varies among children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), and researchers using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) for whole brain analysis identified relationships between emotional lability and neuronal activity in two brain regions.
Perceptions about body image linked to increased alcohol, tobacco use for teens
Virginia Ramseyer-Winter, assistant professor of social work, found negative body image is associated with increased tobacco and alcohol use, with implications for both young men and women.
New clues in puzzle over pre-eclampsia and cholesterol regulation
Scientists studying a mystery link between the dangerous pregnancy complication pre-eclampsia and an increased risk of heart disease in later life for both mother and child have uncovered important new clues.
Late premature birth increases risk of recurrent hospitalization for respiratory illness
A new study of children up to 2 years of age showed that those born late preterm (34-36 weeks) had a significantly greater risk of recurrent hospitalization due to respiratory illness compared to those who were born full term (>37 weeks).
A new virtual approach to science in space
ASU professor and colleagues suggest a new approach to scientific exploration that they call exploration telepresence.
Feelings of power change people's non-verbal responses to dominance displays
Feelings of power determine how people respond non-verbally to dominance displays such as a staring gaze, new research led by a psychologist at the University of Kent, UK, has found.
Parasite strain-specific factors determine malaria disease severity
Scientists have uncovered strain-specific differences between malaria parasites that are linked to their potential to cause illness in humans, which could have important implications for antimalarial vaccine trials currently underway.
Study answers why ketamine helps depression, offers target for safer therapy
UT Southwestern Medical Center scientists have identified a key protein that helps trigger ketamine's rapid antidepressant effects in the brain, a crucial step to developing alternative treatments to the controversial drug being dispensed in a growing number of clinics across the country.
UV-sensing protein in the brain of a marine annelid zooplankton
Larvae of a marine ragworm Platynereis dumerilii have been studied as a zooplankton model, and possess photoreceptor cells in the brain to regulate circadian swimming behavior.
Birds' feathers reveal their winter diet
Influences outside the breeding season matter a lot for the population health of migratory birds, but it's tough to track what happens once species scatter for the winter.
Regional 'hot spot' of Borna disease discovered in upper Austria
Bornaviruses cause a lethal form of encephalitis, Borna disease, among horses and sheep.
Cosmetic procedures practice and promotion 'cause for serious concern,' says ethics body
New developments and marketing have made an increasing range of surgical and non-surgical cosmetic procedures -- including botox, dermal fillers, implants, and skin lightening, as well as newer techniques such as 'fat freezing' and 'vampire' treatments -- big business and widely accessible.
Newly identified protection mechanism serves as first responder to cellular stress
Researchers at the University of Michigan Life Sciences Institute have identified a new type of rapid-response defense mechanism that helps protect cells from environmental stress while giving slower, well-known protection systems time to act.
CAMH researchers discover brain inflammation in people with OCD
A new brain imaging study by the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH) in Toronto shows for the first time that brain inflammation is significantly elevated -- more than 30 per cent higher -- in people with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) than in people without the condition.
New femto-camera with quadrillion fractions of a second resolution
Researchers from ITMO University have built a setup for recording holograms of tiny objects like living cells with a femtosecond speed.
Assessment of bone density and fracture history can predict long-term fracture risk
Factors such as low bone density and previous fractures are commonly used to predict an individual's risk of experiencing a fracture over the next 10 years.
Fathers' involvement may help prevent childhood obesity
Fathers are becoming more involved with raising children, but limited research has examined their association with childhood obesity.
Three ways neuroscience can advance the concussion debate
While concussion awareness has improved over the past decade, understanding the nuances of these sports injuries, their severity, symptoms, and treatment, is still a work in progress.
Researchers recommend specific diabetes medications to protect bone health
Type 2 diabetes (T2D) and osteoporosis often coexist in patients, but managing both conditions can be a challenge.
Temple study: Extra-virgin olive oil preserves memory & protects brain against Alzheimer's
The Mediterranean diet is associated with a variety of health benefits, including a lower incidence of dementia.
Feeling stressed? Bike to work
New research from Concordia's John Molson School of Business (JMSB) has found that cycling can help reduce stress and improve your work performance.
Study examines use, outcomes of valve replacement procedure performed for off-label indications
Approximately 1 in 10 transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) procedures in the U.S. were for an off-label indication, with similar 1-year mortality rates compared to on-label use, suggesting that TAVR may be a possible procedure option for certain patients requiring a heart valve replacement, according to a study published by JAMA Cardiology.
Computer-designed antibodies target toxins associated with Alzheimer's disease
Researchers at the University of Cambridge have designed antibodies that target the protein deposits in the brain associated with Alzheimer's disease, and stop their production.
New catalyst paves way for carbon neutral fuel
Australian scientists have paved the way for carbon neutral fuel with the development of a new efficient catalyst that converts carbon dioxide (CO2) from the air into synthetic natural gas in a 'clean' process using solar energy.
Trash-picking seagulls poop tons of nutrients
At least 1.4 million seagulls feed at landfills in North America.
Extremely colorful, incredibly bright and highly multiplexed
A team from Harvard's Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering, the LMU Munich, and the Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry in Germany, has engineered highly versatile metafluorophores by integrating commonly used small fluorescent probes into self-folding DNA structures where their colors and brightness can be digitally programmed.
Study seeks to improve screening for falls in emergency departments
When individuals visit the emergency department after falling, they may receive a diagnosis reflecting the injury sustained -- such as fractures, contusions, etc.
Spanish researchers review the state-of-the-art text mining technologies for chemistry
In a recent Chemical Reviews article, the Biological Text Mining Unit at the Spanish National Cancer Research Centre (CNIO) together with with researchers at the Center for Applied Medical Research (CIMA), of the University of Navarra, in Pamplona, and the Barcelona Supercomputing Centre (BSC-CNS) have published the first exhaustive revision of the state-of-the-art methodologies underlying chemical search engines, named entity recognition and text mining systems.
US textile industry returning to life
After years of losing market share to overseas manufacturers, American textile and fiber makers say their industry is turning around.
Drowsy dormice doze into decline
Britain's population of hazel dormice, famed for their sleepy lifestyle, has declined by more than 70 percent in just over two decades, new research from the University of Exeter has shown.
Wild monkeys use loud calls to assess the relative strength of rivals
Gelada males -- a close relative to baboons -- pay attention to the loud calls of a rival to gain information about his relative fighting ability compared to themselves, a new study indicated.
Deceleration of runaway electrons paves the way for fusion power
Fusion power has the potential to provide clean and safe energy that is free from carbon dioxide emissions.
Hot summer frequents Europe-west Asia and northeast Asia after the mid-1990s
A recent research identifies a nonuniform warming pattern in summer after the mid-1990s over the Eurasian continent, with a predominant amplified warming over Europe-West Asia and Northeast Asia but much weaker warming over Central Asia.
Single fungus amplifies Crohn's disease symptoms
A microscopic fungus called Candida tropicalis triggered gut inflammation and exacerbated symptoms of Crohn's disease, in a recent study conducted at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine.
Hubble captures massive dead disk galaxy that challenges theories of galaxy evolution
By combining the power of a 'natural lens' in space with the capability of NASA's Hubble Space Telescope, astronomers made a surprising discovery -- the first example of a compact yet massive, fast-spinning, disk-shaped galaxy that stopped making stars only a few billion years after the big bang.
NASA sees Tropical Storm Cindy soaking the Gulf Coast
NASA's Aqua satellite captured an image of Tropical Storm Cindy after it formed and was already affecting the US Gulf Coast states.
Addressing refugee and immigrant women's stress
Refugee and undocumented immigrant women may experience unique and ongoing stress following migration, in addition to the pre- and post-migration traumatic events all immigrants may experience.
New approach to teaching music improvisation enhances creativity
New research looks at developing processes for musical improvisation that enhance creativity.
Eating fish may reduce arthritis symptoms
In a recent study, individuals with rheumatoid arthritis who consumed fish 2 times/week had lower disease activity (swollen/tender joint counts along with other assessments) than those who ate fish never to <1/month.
A patent study on the great new hope emerging from marine derived anticancer drugs
Anticancer agents targeting microtubule from marine sources hold great potential in the field of cancer therapeutics and are gradually advancing in the clinical setup.
An end to population aging in China, Germany, USA
New measures of aging, combined with UN population projections, show that population aging is likely to end before 2100 in China, Germany, and the USA.
Rice U. chemists create 3-D printed graphene foam
Nanotechnologists from Rice University and China's Tianjin University have used 3-D laser printing to create centimeter-sized objects of graphene foam, a 3-D version of atomically thin graphene.
Enzyme catalyzed decomposition of 4-hydroxycyclophosphamide
Oxazaphosphorine cytostatics (Cyclophosphamide, Ifosfamide) are often used and very effective anticancer agents; but so far little is known about the molecular basis for the antitumor effect.
Parkinson's is partly an autoimmune disease, study finds
Researchers have found the first direct evidence that autoimmunity plays a role in Parkinson's disease, suggesting that immunosuppressants might play a role in treatment.
Scientists may have cracked rugby league's code
Scientists from James Cook University and Victoria University may have unlocked the secret behind success in the National Rugby League (NRL) competition.
New statistical method finds shared ancestral gene variants involved in autism's cause
A team led by geneticist Michal Wigler of CSHL has published what they believe is the first rigorous statistical evidence that ancient variations in the human genome contribute to autism -- each, most likely, having a very small effect.
New technique makes brain scans better
To help scientists take advantage of huge numbers of low-quality patient brain scans, a team of MIT researchers has devised a way to boost the quality of these MRI scans so that they can be used for large scale studies of how strokes affect different people.
Record UK rainfall in winter 2013-14 caused by tropics, stratosphere and climate warming
New research has revealed the causes of the UK's record rainfall and subsequent flooding during the 2013-14 winter.
Accelerating rate of temperature rise in the Pyrenees
The Iberian Peninsula is undergoing climate change, with temperatures on the rise, and mountain ranges are not exempt from this trend.
This week from AGU: Remarkable 2016 storms caused massive Antarctic sea ice loss
Weekly AGU news from Geospace, The Landslide Blog, Eos.org and research spotlights.
African leopards revealed: Study documents minute-to-minute behavior of elusive cats
The elusive behavior of the African leopard has been revealed in great detail for the first time as part of a sophisticated study that links the majestic cat's caloric demands and its drive to kill.
Plant inspiration could lead to flexible electronics
Versatile, light-weight materials that are both strong and resilient are crucial for the development of flexible electronics, such as bendable tablets and wearable sensors.
Is there an alternative to disposable diapers?
Jeffrey M. Bender, MD, a pediatric infectious disease specialist at Children's Hospital Los Angeles and Rosemary C.
Stroke history higher in asymptomatic versus symptomatic atrial fibrillation patients
Newly diagnosed asymptomatic atrial fibrillation patients have a higher rate of previous stroke than those with symptoms, according to results from the GLORIA-AF Registry presented today at EHRA EUROPACE - CARDIOSTIM 2017.
One in 6 women with learning disabilities has attempted suicide
A new study by the University of Toronto found that the lifetime prevalence of suicide attempts was much higher for women who had been diagnosed with learning disabilities (16.6 percent) compared to women who had not (3.3 percent).
New 3-D display takes the eye fatigue out of virtual reality
A new type of 3-D display could solve the long-standing problem eye fatigue when using VR and AR equipment by greatly improving the viewing comfort of these wearable devices.
When lovers touch, their breathing and heartbeat syncs, pain wanes, study shows
A new study by pain researchers from University of Colorado and University of Haifa found that when an empathetic partner holds a lover's hand, their heart rates and breathing rates sync and her pain subsides.
Drip by drip
How do crystals grow? The answer given in current textbooks is: Layer by layer atoms or molecules settle on an existing crystal surface.
Clear view on stem cell development
Today, tracking the development of individual cells and spotting the associated factors under the microscope is nothing unusual.
The brain mechanism behind multitasking
New Tel Aviv University research identifies a brain mechanism that enables more efficient multitasking.
Device helps ICU patients by filtering out noise from medical alarms
A team of investigators at Vanderbilt University Medical Center (VUMC) wants to improve patient outcomes in Intensive Care Unit (ICU) settings by silencing audible medical alarms in hospital rooms.
The (extra) eyes have it
Your doctor is an expert with many years of experience.
New sensors could enable more affordable detection of pollution and diseases
When it comes to testing for cancer, environmental pollution and food contaminants, traditional sensors can help.
Underused cancer test could improve treatment for thousands
A simple blood test could improve treatment for more than 1 in 6 stage 2 colon cancer patients, suggests new Mayo Clinic research.
New insights into exercise right ventricular pressure may help define a new 'normal'
Investigators at Brigham and Women's Hospital recently reported an unexpected observation among patients experiencing unexplained shortness of breath.
NASA sees Tropical Storm Bret's finale
Tropical Storm Bret was weakening with NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed overhead on June 20, and within three hours of the overpass, Bret degenerated into a tropical wave.
Warming temperatures threaten sea turtles
This research suggests that that warmer temperatures associated with climate change may lead to higher numbers of female sea turtles and increased nest failure.
New gene mutations found in white blood cells in patients with rheumatoid arthritis
Gene mutations accumulating in cells are typical of the development of cancer.
Rare genetic variants found to increase risk for Tourette syndrome
An international research team led by investigators at Massachusetts General Hospital and the University of California at Los Angeles -- along with their facilitating partner the Tourette Association of America -- has identified rare mutations in two genes that markedly increase the risk for Tourette syndrome (TS), a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by chronic involuntary motor and vocal tics.
What are trends in emergency department utilization, costs for shingles?
A new article published by JAMA Dermatology uses a nationwide database of emergency department (ED) visits to examine herpes zoster (HZ, shingles)-related ED utilization and costs.
Forgetting can make you smarter
A new review paper proposes that the goal of memory is not to transmit the most accurate information over time, but to guide and optimize intelligent decision making by only holding on to valuable information.
Starting school young can put child wellbeing at risk
A study led by the University of Exeter Medical School which investigated more than 2,000 children across 80 primary schools in Devon, has found that children who are younger than their peers when they start school are more likely to develop poorer mental health, as rated by parents and teachers.
U study finds recognition technology a step closer to use in courtroom
A report by University of Minnesota Law Professor Francis Shen, the study's lead author and director of the Neurolaw Lab, finds that brain-based memory recognition technology may be one step closer to court.
Report on stillbirth and neonatal death rates across the UK
Study shows fall in stillbirth rate across the UK -- a step towards the government target.
When estimating extinction risk, don't leave out the males
Extinction risk for some species could be drastically underestimated because most demographic models of animal populations only analyse the number and fertility of females, dismissing male data as 'noise'.
Scientists solve mystery of unexplained 'bright nights'
Dating back to the first century, scientists, philosophers and reporters have noted the occasional occurrence of 'bright nights,' when an unexplained glow in the night sky lets observers see distant mountains, read a newspaper or check their watch.
Screen time or story time?
A new study analyses toddler's reading and learning habits through electronic books compared to print books.
Chimpanzees modify grooming behavior when near higher ranking members
Chimpanzees modify grooming behavior when near higher ranking members.
Researchers uncover genetic gains and losses in Tourette syndrome
Researchers have identified structural changes in two genes that increase the risk of developing Tourette syndrome, a neurological disorder characterized by involuntary motor and vocal tics.
Burn without concern
The USDA Forest Service in the Boundary Waters Canoe Wilderness Area (BWCWA) will continue to use controlled burns without worrying about fish health in associated watersheds.
First-line immunotherapy treatment can improve survival for subset of lung cancer patients
Findings from a phase III clinical trial for advanced lung cancer patients could help oncologists better predict which patients are likely to receive the most benefit from immunotherapy as a first-line treatment based on the unique molecular characteristics of their tumor, according to a new study reported by a global team led by The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer - Arthur G.
Identified brain circuitry bridges neural and behavioral roles in PTSD
Specific cerebral circuitry bridges chemical changes deep in the brain and the more outward behavioral expressions associated with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), which could lead to more objective biomarkers for the disorder, according to a comprehensive review of rapidly changing data published June 22 in the New England Journal of Medicine.
Active 24/7 and doing great
Circadian clocks control the day-night cycle of many living beings.
In organizations, bullying begets whining, study finds
In organizations, bullying within decision-making groups appears to go hand in hand with whining, according to a new study.
Neurons that regenerate, neurons that die
In a new study published in Neuron, investigators report on a transcription factor that they have found that can help certain neurons regenerate, while simultaneously killing others.
Bat biodiversity is in danger on islands worldwide
A new study from the University of Helsinki investigates knowledge gaps among the largely unknown, but greatly threatened, group of island-restricted bats, and leads future research efforts to actual priorities.

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Everyone's seen a piece of science getting over-exaggerated in the media. Most people would be quick to blame journalists and big media for getting in wrong. In many cases, you'd be right. But there's other sources of hype in science journalism. and one of them can be found in the humble, and little-known press release. We're talking with Chris Chambers about doing science about science journalism, and where the hype creeps in. Related links: The association between exaggeration in health related science news and academic press releases: retrospective observational study Claims of causality in health news: a randomised trial This...