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Science Current Events and Science News | Brightsurf | June 23, 2017


Cut US commercial building energy use 29 percent with widespread controls
The US could slash its energy use by the equivalent of what is currently used by 12 to 15 million Americans if commercial buildings fully used energy-efficiency controls nationwide.
Atomic imperfections move quantum communication network closer to reality
An international team led by the University of Chicago's Institute for Molecular Engineering has discovered how to manipulate a weird quantum interface between light and matter in silicon carbide along wavelengths used in telecommunications.
NASA adds up Tropical Storm Cindy's rainfall
Tropical storm Cindy was downgraded to a tropical depression after moving onshore near the Texas and Louisiana Border on Thursday June 22, 2017 and bringing a lot of rain with it.
A unique amino acid for brain cancer therapy
Researchers discover potential application of amino acid taurine in photodynamic therapy for brain cancer.
NUS study: Plants sacrifice 'daughters' to survive chilly weather
A new study by a team of plant biologists from the National University of Singapore found that some plants may selectively kill part of their roots to survive under cold weather conditions.
Following a friend leads to unsafe driving behavior
A new study inspired by a court case involving a driver seriously hurt in an accident when following another car to a destination, provides evidence to show that the car behind makes risky driving maneuvers.
Does the emperor have clothes?
Discovered more than two decades ago, the hormone leptin has been widely hailed as the key regulator of leanness.
MRI without contrast agents? Yes, with sugar!
Scientists from the German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), in collaboration with colleagues from Heidelberg University Hospital, have been able to visualize brain cancer using a novel MRI method.
New research reveals impact of seismic surveys on zooplankton
Marine seismic surveys used in petroleum exploration could cause a two to three-fold increase in mortality of adult and larval zooplankton, new research published in leading science journal Nature Ecology and Evolution has found.
Existing drugs could benefit patients with bone cancer, genetic study suggests
A subgroup of patients with osteosarcoma -- a form of bone cancer -- could be helped by an existing drug, suggest scientists from the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute and their collaborators.
How insulin in the brain may suppress the subjective feeling of hunger
Insulin in the brain may help regulate the hunger sensation and improve functional connectivity in certain cognitive brain regions (default-mode network, DMN *) as well as in the hippocampus and hypothalamus.
Does dark matter annihilate quicker in the Milky Way?
Researchers at the Tata Institute of Fundamental Research in Mumbai have proposed a theory that predicts how dark matter may be annihilating much more rapidly in the Milky Way, than in smaller or larger galaxies and the early Universe.
Protein mingling under blue light
IBS scientists developed a new faster and more efficient optogenetic tool to manipulate protein clusters under blue light.
Genes, ozone, and autism
Exposure to ozone in the environment puts individuals with high levels of genetic variation at an even higher risk for developing autism than would be expected just by adding the two risk factors together, a new analysis shows.
More breast cancers were diagnosed at early stage after Affordable Care Act took effect
A Loyola University Chicago study published this month has found an increase in the percentage of breast cancer patients who were diagnosed in early Stage 1, after the Affordable Care Act took effect.
Chatter in the deep brain spurs empathy in rats
By combining electrical monitoring of neural activity with machine learning, a team of Duke and Stanford University neuroscientists has tuned into the brain chatter of rats engaged in helping other rats.
Targeted drug shows promise in rare advanced kidney cancer
Some patients with a form of advanced kidney cancer benefited from an experimental drug targeted to an abnormal genetic pathway causing cancerous growth, according to research led by Dana-Farber Cancer Institute scientists.
Immunotherapy kinder than chemotherapy for patients with head and neck cancer
The immunotherapy nivolumab is kinder than chemotherapy for people with advanced head and neck cancer -- easing many of the negative effects of the disease on patients' quality of life.
Special issue of Future Medicinal Chemistry explores advances in neurodegenerative disease therapy
Future Medicinal Chemistry, a leading MEDLINE indexed journal for medicinal chemists, has published two Special Focus issues on Medicinal Chemistry Advances in Neurodegenerative Disease Therapy.
Self-folding origami
Plastic with a thousand faces: A single piece of Nafion foil makes it possible to produce a broad palette of complex 3-D structures.
Is it okay for children to count on their fingers?
Is it OK for children to count on their fingers?
Fungal toxins easily become airborne, creating potential indoor health risk
Toxins produced by three different species of fungus growing indoors on wallpaper may become aerosolized, and easily inhaled.
Study shines light on brain cells that coordinate movement
A technique for inserting a gene into specific cell types in the adult brain can be used to alter the function of brain circuits and change behaviors in an animal model.
Anti-epilepsy drug restores normal brain activity in mild Alzheimer's disease
In a recent feasibility study, BIDMC tested an anti-epileptic drug for its potential impact on the brain activity of patients with mild Alzheimer's disease.
Making ferromagnets stronger by adding non-magnetic elements
Researchers at the US Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory discovered that they could functionalize magnetic materials through a thoroughly unlikely method, by adding amounts of the virtually non-magnetic element scandium to a gadolinium-germanium alloy.
Dietary and lifestyle recommendations for patients at risk of macular degeneration
Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a major cause of severe visual impairment in older populations and is characterized by progressive destruction of the retinal pigment epithelial cells and photoreceptors due to low-grade inflammation, ischemia and oxidative stress.
Algorithm generates origami folding patterns for any shape
A new algorithm generates practical paper-folding patterns to produce any 3-D structure.
Experts uncover first molecular events of organ rejection
Researchers at the University of Pittsburgh and the University of Toronto have uncovered the first molecular steps that lead to immune system activation and eventual rejection of a transplanted organ.
Sweet bribes for ants are key to crops bearing fruit, study shows
Some flowering crops, such as beans and cotton, carefully manage the amount and sweetness of nectar produced on their flowers and leaves, to recruit colonising ants which deter herbivores.
Putting others first can cost lives in emergencies
Selfless heroism isn't the best strategy in life-and-death disaster situations involving groups of people, a new study from the University of Waterloo suggests.
Neutron-rich nucleus shapeshifts between a rugby ball and a discus
Researchers have shown that there are two coexisting, competing quantum shapes at low energy in 98Kr, never before seen for neutron-rich Kr isotopes.
Bioengineers create more durable, versatile wearable for diabetes monitoring
Researchers at The University of Texas at Dallas are getting more out of the sweat they've put into their work on a wearable diagnostic tool that measures three diabetes-related compounds in microscopic amounts of perspiration.
Leisure activities lower blood pressure in Alzheimer's caregivers
Going for a walk outside, reading, listening to music--these and other enjoyable activities can reduce blood pressure for elderly caregivers of spouses with Alzheimer's disease, suggests a study in Psychosomatic Medicine: Journal of Biobehavioral Medicine, the official journal of the American Psychosomatic Society.
More democracy through mathematics
For democratic elections to be fair, voting districts must have similar sizes.
New 3-D model predicts best planting practices for farmers
The University of Illinois and the Partner Institute for Computational Biology in Shanghai developed a computer model to predict the yield of different crop cultivars in a multitude of planting conditions.
NIST/CU team launches 'comb and copter' system to map atmospheric gases
Researchers from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and the University of Colorado Boulder have demonstrated a new mobile, ground-based system that could scan and map atmospheric gas plumes over kilometer distances.
Bird's eye perspective
Harvard Medical School researchers have now provided the first insight into the perplexing question of how humans developed their daytime vision.
Dune ecosystem modelling
Using the acacia as an example, researchers show that the location has an effect on interaction with other species.
Treating Lyme disease: When do symptoms resolve in children?
Mattia Chason, M.D., and colleagues in infectious disease examined how quickly Lyme disease symptoms typically resolve in children, a research question that has received little prior study.
Don't leave baby boomers behind when designing wearable technology
Accounting for age-related cognitive and physical challenges can increase adoption rates for older users who need help managing their health.
Patient race & gender are important in predicting heart attack in the emergency department
Researchers at the George Washington University published research finding that certain symptoms are more and less predictive of patients' risk for acute coronary syndrome, which includes heart attack, in patients of different gender and race.
Safety-net providers can adopt medical home models and improve primary care
The medical home model of advanced primary care is being adopted by practices across the nation, but there have been questions about whether the approach can be accomplished in safety net settings.
Equipping form with function
Mechanical structures in steerable cars are optimized to fit exactly one particular shape of the toy.
By far, men garner most coveted speaking slots at virology meetings
In their recent study, published in the Journal of Virology, the University of Wisconsin-Madison researchers examined 35 years worth of invited speaker rosters from four prominent virology meetings, including the American Society for Virology, which is hosting its annual meeting in Madison, Wisconsin starting June 24, 2017.
How the climate can rapidly change at tipping points
During the last glacial period, within only a few decades the influence of atmospheric CO2 on the North Atlantic circulation resulted in temperature increases of up to 10 degrees Celsius in Greenland -- as indicated by new climate calculations from researchers at the Alfred Wegener Institute and the University of Cardiff.
Senate health reform proposal jeopardizes care for us all as we age, AGS experts
Newest proposal in a line of legislation to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act will harm access to key health services for older Americans, families, caregivers, and healthcare professionals, the AGS has said in a statement.
Lights out: The neural relationship between light and sleep
While a great deal is known about how light affects circadian rhythms, little is known about the direct effects of light on sleep: Why do we tend to wake up if the lights are flipped on in the middle of the night?
Research accelerates quest for quicker, longer-lasting electronics
In the world of electronics, where the quest is always for smaller and faster units with infinite battery life, topological insulators (TI) have tantalizing potential.

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