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Science News | Science Current Events | Brightsurf | November 20, 2017


Oncotarget: Researchers identify a potential molecular trigger for invasiveness in prostate cancer cells
A small protein modification can trigger the aggressive migratory and invasive properties of prostate cancer cells, according to new research published on the cover of Oncotarget.
Sleeve gastrectomy, common weight-loss surgery, lowers women's tolerance to alcohol
Women who have had gastric sleeve surgery to lose weight may want to consider limiting the number of alcoholic drinks they consume post-surgery.
Use of Prostate Health Index test reduces unnecessary biopsies
The Prostate Health Index (phi) is a cost-effective tool used by urologists to detect prostate cancer.
Antarctic landscape insights keep ice loss forecasts on the radar
New maps of a mountainous landscape under a key glacier in West Antarctica will be a valuable aid in forecasting sea level changes.
Study: Mental health mobile apps are effective self-help tools
When it comes to strengthening your mental or emotional health, would you trust an app?
New research indicates likely hydrological implications of rapid global warming
Researchers studying a rapid global warming event, around 56 million years ago, have shown evidence of major changes in the intensity of rainfall and flood events.
Overweight women may need more frequent mammograms
Women with higher body mass index (BMI) face an increased risk of not detecting their breast tumor until it has become large, according to a new study.
NeuroExpresso: Web app enables exploration of brain cell types
An online database of gene expression profiles for 36 major types of brain cells from 12 brain regions, based on mouse data from multiple laboratories, is reported in a new paper published in eNeuro.
Genome sequencing reveals extensive inbreeding in Scandinavian wolves
Researchers from Uppsala University and others have for the first time determined the full genetic consequences of intense inbreeding in a threatened species.
Motorcycle crashes cause 5 times as many deaths as car accidents, 6 times the health costs
Motorcycle accidents are costly in terms of lives and health care costs.
Albatross populations in decline from fishing and environmental change
The populations of wandering, black-browed and grey-headed albatrosses have halved over the last 35 years on sub-antarctic Bird Island according to a new study published today (Nov.
Patient-centered medical home model improves chronic disease management
Data from more than 800 Veterans Health Administration (VHA) primary care clinics revealed that national implementation of a patient-centered medical home model was effective at improving several chronic disease outcomes over time.
Cholesterol helps flu virus escape through host cell's membrane
An MIT study provides the clearest picture yet of how viral buds filled with flu virus are pinched off from a host cell membrane before breaking free to infect again.
Study shows new second line therapy for metastatic colorectal cancer is effective and safe
A randomised trial in 650 patients has confirmed the safety and efficacy of a new second line treatment for metastatic colorectal cancer, researchers report at the ESMO Asia 2017 Congress.
Materialists collect Facebook friends and spend more time on social media
If you're materialistic, you're likely to use Facebook more frequently and intensely.
Special Focus Issue of Future Oncology highlights advances in image guided therapy
The Future Science Group (FSG) published journal, Future Oncology, has released a special focus issue that examines the field of image guided therapy in oncology, highlighting the latest advancements in image guided therapy and the application of several techniques in a number of cancer types.
NASA spots Tropical Depression Kirogi dissipating
Tropical Depression Kirogi made landfall in southeastern Vietnam on Nov.
Quantum dots amplify light with electrical pumping
In a breakthrough development, Los Alamos scientists have shown that they can successfully amplify light using electrically excited films of the chemically synthesized semiconductor nanocrystals known as quantum dots.
Cultural values can be a strong predictor of alcohol consumption
New research shows that countries with populations that value autonomy and harmony tend to have higher average levels of alcohol consumption than countries with more traditional values, such as hierarchy and being part of a collective.
Enterovirus vaccine prevents virus-induced diabetes in a T1D experimental model
Scientists at the University of Tampere (Finland) and the Karolinska Institutet (Sweden) have demonstrated that an enterovirus vaccine can protect against virus-induced diabetes in a mouse model for Type 1 diabetes.
Seafloor sediments appear to enhance Earthquake and Tsunami danger in Pacific Northwest
The Cascadia Subduction Zone off the coast of the Pacific Northwest has all the ingredients for making powerful earthquakes -- and according to the geological record, the region is due for its next 'big one.' A new study led by The University of Texas at Austin has found that the occurrence of these big, destructive quakes and associated devastating tsunamis may be linked to compact sediments along large portions of the subduction zone.
Diagnosing the impacts of health policy
KAUST shows a new statistical technique offers a better way to gauge the effectiveness of complex healthcare interventions.
What's in your wheat? Johns Hopkins scientists piece together genome of most common bread wheat
Johns Hopkins scientists report they have successfully used two separate gene technologies to assemble the most complete genome sequence to date of Triticum aestivum, the most common cultivated species of wheat used to make bread.
Light green plants save nitrogen without sacrificing photosynthetic efficiency
Scientists designed plants with light green leaves with hopes of allowing more light to penetrate the crop canopy and increase overall light use efficiency and yield.
MRI uncovers brain abnormalities in people with depression and anxiety
Researchers using MRI have discovered a common pattern of structural abnormalities in the brains of people with depression and social anxiety, according to a new study.
Protein intentionally terminates own synthesis by destabilizing synthesis machinery -- the ribosome
A joint research group of Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) and Kyoto Sangyo University has discovered that a protein, during its synthesis, may destabilize the structure of the ribosome[1] and end its own synthesis prematurely, and found that this phenomenon is used for adapting the cell to its environment.
Researchers describe new biology of Alzheimer's disease
In a new study, researchers from Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) describe a unique model for the biology of Alzheimer's disease (AD) which may lead to an entirely novel approach for treating the disease.
NASA's James Webb Space Telescope completes final cryogenic testing
The vault-like, 40-foot diameter, 40-ton door of Chamber A at NASA's Johnson Space Center in Houston was unsealed on Nov.
Resident physician is shaped by a difficult patient's life and death
When a patient dies in the early years of a resident's training, the resident gains insights into the complicated relationships that can mark patients' lives and deaths.
Space dust may transport life between worlds, research suggests
Life on Earth might have originated from tiny organisms brought to our planet in streams of fast-moving space dust, according to a new study.
UTSA researcher studies evolution of climate change activism
Climate change is a topic that is debated, doubted and covered by news outlets across the world.
Hydrogen cars for the masses one step closer to reality, thanks to UCLA invention
UCLA researchers have designed a new device that can inexpensively and efficiently create and store energy and create hydrogen fuel, and that needs only sunlight to operate.
Sensors could identify biomarkers, improve early-stage detection, treatment of diseases
Purdue University researchers have found a method of identifying biological markers in small amounts of blood that they believe could be used to detect a myriad of diseases, infections and different medical conditions at early stages.
Slight climate shifts can affect optimum water use in plant communities
A new discovery is providing scientists a better understanding of how rainfall is shared beneficially by the plant community and the human population, in addition to the effects of climate change.
Reusing waste energy with 2-D electron gas
Novel approach utilizes high mobility two-dimensional electron gas, boosting thermoelectric conversion efficiency.
The latest poop from the turkey coop
Treated excrement from turkeys, chickens and other poultry, when converted to combustible solid biomass fuel, could replace approximately 10 percent of coal used in electricity generation, reducing greenhouse gases and providing an alternative energy source, according to a new study by Ben-Gurion University of the Negev (BGU) researchers.
New approach to studying chromosomes' centers may reveal link to Down syndrome and more
A new technique may force the centromere -- the mysterious stretch of DNA in the center of every chromosome -- to give up its secrets at last.
Blueprint to reduce wasteful blood transfusions
By analyzing data from randomized clinical trials comparing blood transfusion approaches, Johns Hopkins experts, along with colleagues at Cleveland Clinic and NYU Langone Medical Center, endorse recommendations for blood transfusions that reduce blood use to improve patient safety and outcomes.
State of CPR education in US high schools
Bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is known to improve survival of cardiac arrest; however, there is a disparate geographic variation in cardiac arrest survival and only a small number of the US population is trained in CPR annually.
Patients and families aren't comfortable with 'overlapping surgeries,' survey finds
Patients and family members are either neutral or uncomfortable with the idea of 'overlapping' or 'concurrent' surgery, where the attending surgeon isn't present in the operating room for part of the procedure, according to survey results published in the November 15, 2017 issue of The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery.
Many cancer survivors are living with PTSD
A recent study showed approximately one-fifth of patients with cancer experienced post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) several months after diagnosis, and many of these patients continued to live with PTSD years later.
Thinking big by burning small
A recent paper by scientists from Wits University in South Africa shows how creative fire management can increase habitat for wildebeest and other grazing animals in national parks.
Chimp females who leave home postpone parenthood
Female chimps that lack supportive friends and family wait longer to start having babies, Duke University researchers find.
New oral anticoagulant drugs associated with lower kidney risks
Mayo Clinic researchers have shown a link between which type of oral anticoagulant (blood-thinning medication) a patient takes to prevent a stroke and increased risks of kidney function decline or failure.
Zika-related nerve damage caused by immune response to the virus
The immune system's response to the Zika virus, rather than the virus itself, may be responsible for nerve-related complications of infection, according to a Yale study.
Now you like it, now you don't
Researchers from the Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital of McGill University have proven it is possible to increase or decrease our enjoyment of music, and our craving for more of it, by enhancement or disruption of certain brain circuits.
MIT physicists design $100 handheld muon detector
Physicists at MIT have designed a pocket-sized cosmic ray muon detector to track these ghostly particles.
Optimal gout treatment requires ongoing monitoring for urate lowering therapy
Managing gout as a chronic, rather than an acute, condition could help prevent recurrences.
New framework for multimorbidity care identifies changes and gaps
Researchers have developed a new framework for reporting and designing models of care for multimorbidity.
Can MicroRNA levels identify concussion symptom duration in children?
MicroRNAs in the saliva of children and young adults with mild traumatic brain injury appeared to better identify people with prolonged concussion symptoms than a standard survey of reported symptoms.
Realistic rodent model of drug addiction
Drug addiction may not require a habitual relationship with a substance, suggests findings from a new model of cocaine administration in rats that better captures the human experience of obtaining and using drugs.
PSU researchers design survey to tap students' motivation in STEM
Researchers at Portland State University are learning more about undergraduates' experience in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) classes and sharing a set of survey questions that will help researchers and educators at other universities do the same.
Previous evidence of water on mars now identified as grainflows
Dark features previously proposed as evidence for significant liquid water flowing on Mars have now been identified as granular flows, where sand and dust move rather than liquid water, according to a new article published in Nature Geoscience by the USGS.
Simple EKG can determine whether patient has depression or bipolar disorder
A groundbreaking Loyola Medicine study suggests that a simple 15-minute electrocardiogram could help a physician determine whether a patient has major depression or bipolar disorder.
Dementia study sheds light on how damage spreads through brain
Insights into how a key chemical disrupts brain cells in a common type of dementia have been revealed by scientists led by the University of Edinburgh.
Righty blue whales sometimes act like lefties, study finds
To support their hulking bodies, blue whales use various acrobatic maneuvers to scoop up many individually tiny prey, filtering the water back out through massive baleen plates.
Two out of 3 parents struggle finding childcare that meets their health, safety standards
The search for the best preschool or childcare option is often a challenging experience -- and many parents aren't sure if the one they pick is safe and healthy for their child.
Osimertinib improves progression-free survival in Asian EGFR-mutated lung cancer patients
Osimertinib improves progression-free survival compared to standard first line therapy in Asian patients with EGFR-mutated non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), according to the Asian subset analysis of the FLAURA trial presented at the ESMO Asia 2017 Congress, sumultaneously published in The New England Journal of Medicine.
Smiling human faces are attractive to dogs -- thanks to oxytocin
Researchers in the University of Helsinki's Canine Mind research project found that oxytocin made dogs interested in smiling human faces.
First known interstellar visitor is an 'oddball'
Gemini Observatory provided key observations in characterizing an object visiting from outside our solar system, 'Oumuamua.
Reports of shared decision making increase in the united states, but disparities exist
Between 2002 and 2014, reports of shared decision making increased significantly among adult Americans.
UVA researchers discover a new target for 'triple-negative' breast cancer
One of the most difficult to treat cancers - triple-negative breast cancer - may be vulnerable to a new approach, an early study indicates.
Do women receive appropriate counseling when they freeze their eggs?
Oocyte cryopreservation is on the rise, and whether a woman freezes her eggs before undergoing medical treatment that could leave her infertile or undergoes an elective procedure to avoid concerns about reproductive aging, extensive counseling should be the norm.
Video tags reveal surprising details of blue whale feeding behavior
The lunge feeding of blue whales is an extraordinary biomechanical event in which the largest animal on Earth accelerates and opens its mouth under water, expanding its enormous throat pouch to engulf a huge volume of water, then filtering out its prey.
Anticholinergic cognitive burden scale helps identify risk of adverse outcomes
Anticholinergic burden assessed with the Anticholinergic Cognitive Burden Scale consistently shows dose-response relationships with a variety of adverse outcomes.
The strange case of the scuba-diving fly
How a species of fly subverted nature to forage in a caustic underwater habitat.
How emancipation contributes to trust in strangers
In many countries, human empowerment -- including freedom of expression and action -- tends to increase people's generalised trust in other people, particularly strangers.
Artificial photosynthesis gets big boost from new catalyst
A new catalyst created by U of T Engineering researchers brings them one step closer to artificial photosynthesis -- a system that, just like plants, would use renewable energy to convert carbon dioxide (CO2) into stored chemical energy.
Ancient fish scales and vertebrate teeth share an embryonic origin
Latest findings support the theory that teeth in the animal kingdom evolved from the jagged scales of ancient fish, the remnants of which can be seen today embedded in the skin of sharks and skate.
Improved method of engineering T-cells to attack cancer
Researchers at Cardiff University have found a way to boost the cancer-destroying ability of the immune system's T-cells, offering new hope in the fight against a wide range of cancers.
A curious quirk brings organic diode lasers one step closer
Since their invention in 1962, semiconductor diode lasers have revolutionized communications and made possible information storage and retrieval in CDs, DVDs and Blu-ray devices.
Rise in oxygen levels links to ancient explosion of life, researchers find
A team of researchers, including a faculty member and postdoctoral fellow from Washington University in St.
Tiger bones? Lion bones? An almost extinct cycad? On-the-spot DNA checks at ports of entry
Wildlife species are going extinct faster than humankind can reliably keep track of.
Astronomers reveal nearby stars that are among the oldest in our galaxy
Astronomers have discovered some of the oldest stars in our Milky Way galaxy by determining their locations and velocities, according to a study led by scientists at Georgia State University.
New catalyst controls activation of a carbon-hydrogen bond
Chemists have developed another catalyst that can selectively activate a carbon-hydrogen bond, part of an ongoing strategy to revolutionize the field of organic synthesis and open up new chemical space.
Filling the gap: High-latitude volcanic eruptions also have global impact
Chinese and German scientists have found evidences showing that a high-latitude volcano can enhance the aerosol layer in the tropical stratosphere, and also have impact on the climate of both hemispheres.
Clay mineral waters Earth's mantle from the inside
The first observation of a super-hydrated phase of the clay mineral kaolinite could improve our understanding of processes leading to volcanism and affecting earthquakes.
Digital pills successfully monitor opioid use after injury
BWH investigators report on the results from a pilot study of 15 individuals who received a prescription to take oxycodone digital pills as needed following treatment for acute fractures.
Twisted sex allows mirror-image snails to mate face-to-face, research finds
A study led by the University of Nottingham has found that differently-coiled types of Japanese land snails should in fact be considered a single species, because -- against all odds - they are sometimes able to mate, a result which has implications for the classification of other snails.
Pairing cancer genomics with cognitive computing highlights potential therapeutic options
University of North Carolina Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center-led study has demonstrated the ability of cognitive computing to scour large volumes of data from scientific studies and databases to identify potentially relevant clinical trials or therapeutic options for cancer patients based on the genetics of their tumors.
Added Arctic data shows global warming didn't pause
Missing Arctic temperature data, not Mother Nature, created the seeming slowdown of global warming from 1998 to 2012, according to a new study in the journal Nature Climate Change.
Borophene shines alone as 2-D plasmonic material
An atom-thick film of boron could be the first pure two-dimensional material able to emit visible and near-infrared light by activating its plasmons, according to Rice University scientists.
Preclinical study demonstrates promising treatment for rare bone disease
Researchers at Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute (SBP) have led a preclinical study demonstrating that the drug palovarotene suppresses the formation of bony tumors (osteochondromas) in models of multiple hereditary exostoses (MHE).
'Brazil nut effect' helps explain how rivers resist erosion, Penn team finds
In a new study, geophysicists from the University of Pennsylvania found that granular segregation helps explain the tendency of riverbeds to be lined by, or 'armored' with, a layer of relatively larger particles.
Spin current from heat: New material increases efficiency
Electronic devices such as computers generate heat that mostly goes to waste.
Nanoparticles could allow for faster, better medicine
Gold nanoparticles could help make drugs act more quickly and effectively, according to new research conducted at Binghamton University, State University of New York.
Smoking study personalizes treatment
A simple blood test is allowing Vanderbilt University Medical Center (VUMC) researchers to determine which patients should be prescribed varenicline (Chantix) to stop smoking and which patients could do just as well, and avoid side effects, by using a nicotine patch.
Can social media users prevent use of online information to characterize and target them?
A new study examines how organizations use information people disclose on social network sites (SNS) to predict their personal characteristics and whether SNS users can successfully block certain information (and how much) to better protect their privacy.
Recovery of West Coast marine mammals boosts consumption of chinook salmon
The researchers estimate that from 1975 to 2015, the yearly biomass of chinook salmon consumed by pinnipeds (sea lions and harbor seals) and killer whales increased from 6,100 to 15,200 metric tons, and from five to 31.5 million individual salmon.
Robotic device tracks plant growth at the cellular level
Determining how various treatments and conditions affect the mechanical properties of plant cells could allow scientists to understand plant growth at the cellular level and devise ways to enhance it.
Cell cycle proteins help immune cells trap microbes with nets made of DNA
In your bloodstream, there are immune cells called neutrophils that, when faced with a pathogenic threat, will expel their DNA like a net to contain it.
Study reveals new mechanism used by cancer cells to disarm attacking immune cells
A new study by researchers at The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center -- James Cancer Hospital and Solove Research Institute identifies a substance released by pancreatic cancer cells that protects them from attack by immune cells called macrophages.
Study pinpoints arctic shorebird decline
A new study co-authored by WCS (Wildlife Conservation Society) addresses concerns over the many Arctic shorebird populations in precipitous decline.
Clinical trial suggests new cell therapy for relapsed leukemia patients
A significant proportion of children and young adults with treatment-resistant B-cell leukemia who participated in a small study achieved remission with the help of a new form of gene therapy, according to researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine and the National Cancer Institute.
Study: Non-fearful social withdrawal linked positively to creativity
Spending too much time alone can be unhealthy and there is growing evidence that the psychosocial effects of too much solitude can last a lifetime.
Scientific research on disasters represents 0.22 percent of global scholarly output, shows Elsevier report
Despite loss of life and economic devastation worldwide due to increasingly frequent natural and man-made disasters, scientific research on disasters represents a small percentage of scholarly output, a study by Elsevier, the global information analytics business specializing in science and health, shows.
New way to write magnetic info could pave the way for hardware neural networks
Researchers have shown how to write any magnetic pattern desired onto nanowires, which could help computers mimic how the brain processes information.
Pre-diabetes discovery marks step towards precision medicine
Identification of three molecules that can be used to accurately assess pre-diabetes -- a key predictor of conditions such as diabetes and high blood pressure -- has brought precision medicine for humans a step closer.
UofL researchers discover key signaling protein for muscle growth
Researchers at University of Louisville have discovered the importance of a well-known protein, myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88 (MyD88), in the development and regeneration of muscles.
Why rural coal families are less likely to divorce
Rural coal-mining families show resilience against divorce when faced with the economic downturns common in the industry, a new study suggests.
Family physician calls for a return to human connection
How can medical practices create and sustain healthy cultures at a time of rapid and often stressful change?
BGRF scientists co-publish research paper on blockchain & AI for biomedical applications
Biogerontology Research Foundation Chief Science Officer (CSO) co-authored the landmark paper in the journal Oncotarget on the convergence of blockchain and AI to decentralize and galvanize healthcare and biomedical research.
Most older adults prefer to participate in medical decisions
Although most older Americans prefer to actively participate in making health care decisions, those with four or more chronic conditions are less likely to prefer active decision making.
A physician explores her own experience with postpartum depression
I thought I knew what it meant for patients to hear a diagnosis of postpartum depression,
Cell-weighing method could help doctors choose cancer drugs
MIT researchers have shown that they can use a new type of measurement to predict how drugs will affect cancer cells taken from multiple myeloma patients.
Proteins in breastmilk protect offspring against food allergy
The breastmilk of mothers exposed to egg during pregnancy and breastfeeding has been found to protect nursing newborns against egg allergy symptoms.
Uncovering essential enzymes for plant growth during nitrogen starvation
A study led by researchers at Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) has found that two key enzymes in plants called PAH1 and PAH2[1] are critical for survival and growth under nitrogen-depleted conditions.
Photocrosslinkable, thermoreversible, type-I collagen bioink for photolithographic printing
A type-I collagen derivative with unique properties enables photolithographic bioprinting of 3-D scaffolds.
What makes soil, soil? Researchers find hidden clues in DNA
Ever wondered what makes a soil, soil? And could soil from the Amazon rainforest really be the same as soil from your garden?
How antibiotic use in animals is contributing to antibiotic resistance
The overuse of veterinary antibiotics in animal production and the subsequent land applications of manure contribute to increased antibiotic resistance in soil.
Another danger sign for coral reefs: Substitute symbiont falls short
For reef-building corals, not just any symbiotic algae will do, new research shows.
Benzodiazepines increase mortality in persons with Alzheimer's disease
Benzodiazepine and related drug use is associated with a 40 percent increase in mortality among persons with Alzheimer's disease, according to a new study from the University of Eastern Finland.
Scientists discover most blue whales are 'right-handed' -- except when they swim upward
A team of scientists that used motion-sensing tags to track the movements of more than five dozen blue whales off the California coast discovered that most have a lateralization bias - in other words, they essentially are 'right-handed' or 'left-handed.'
Neurobiology: Fixated on food?
Contrast has an impact on the optokinetic reflex, which enables us to clearly perceive the landscape from a moving train.
Glass microparticles enhance solar cells efficiency
Scientists from ITMO University have developed a new solar cell coating based on amorphous silicon that combines the features of an electrode and those of a light-trapping structure.
Breast milk found to protect against food allergy
Eating allergenic foods during pregnancy can protect your child from food allergies, especially if you breastfeed, suggests new research from Boston Children's Hospital.
Some cancer therapies may provide a new way to treat high blood pressure
Drugs designed to halt cancer growth may offer a new way to control high blood pressure (hypertension), say Georgetown University Medical Center investigators.
Researchers pin down one source of a potent greenhouse gas
Researchers have discovered the first known methane-producing microbe that is active in an oxygen-rich environment -- a finding that suggests today's global climate models may be misjudging the amount of methane being released into the atmosphere.
Car, stroller, juice: Babies understand when words are related
By six to nine months, babies already have a basic understanding of words for food and body parts.
Molecules in spit may be able to diagnose and predict length of concussions
Diagnosing a concussion can sometimes be a guessing game, but clues taken from small molecules in saliva may be able to help diagnose and predict the duration of concussions in children, according to Penn State College of Medicine researchers.
Simplified method allows CGM users to leverage trend arrow data
Endocrine Society experts have developed a streamlined method for using the Dexcom G5 Mobile Continuous Glucose Monitor (CGM) to help individuals with diabetes maintain better control of their glucose levels, according to two perspectives published in the Journal of the Endocrine Society.
Brain cell advance brings fresh hope for CJD therapies
Scientists at the University of Edinburgh have developed a new system to study Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in the laboratory, paving the way for research to find treatments for the fatal brain disorder.
For adults younger than 78, risk for heart disease linked to risk for problems walking
A team of researchers from Sweden's Karolinska Institutet in Stockholm examined the factors that put older adults at higher risk for developing physical limitations as they age.
ESO observations show first interstellar asteroid is like nothing seen before
For the first time ever astronomers have studied an asteroid that has entered the Solar System from interstellar space.
Diabetes drug helps repair UV-damaged DNA in cells of 'Moon children'
The severe and debilitating genetic disease Xeroderma pigmentosum impedes cells to repair UV-induced DNA damage.
Maintaining sufficient vitamin D levels may help to prevent rheumatoid arthritis
Maintaining sufficient vitamin D levels may help to prevent the onset of inflammatory diseases like rheumatoid arthritis, research led by the University of Birmingham has discovered.
Autoimmune disease discovery could spark new treatments
University of Colorado Boulder researchers have discovered a potent, drug-like compound that could someday revolutionize treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and other autoimmune diseases.
Ancient barley took high road to China
First domesticated 10,000 years ago in the Fertile Crescent of the Middle East, wheat and barley took vastly different routes to China, with barley switching from a winter to both a winter and summer crop during a thousand-year detour along the southern Tibetan Plateau, suggests new research from Washington University in St.

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