Brightsurf Science News & Current Events

December 08, 2017
Research leads to call for lung health screening at top football clubs
New research from the University of Kent has discovered that nearly three in 10 elite footballers at top clubs in England have undetected lung and airway problems that could impair their on-field performance.

Novel compound restores immune response in patients with melanoma
A novel compound may restore immune response in patients with melanoma, according to a study presented at the ESMO Immuno Oncology Congress 2017.

Consuming sugary drinks during pregnancy may increase asthma risk in mid-childhood
Children between the ages of 7 and 9 may be at greater risk for developing asthma if they consumed high amounts of fructose in early childhood or their mothers drank a lot of sugar-sweetened beverages while pregnant, according to new research published online in the Annals of the American Thoracic Society.

Unique pattern of brain inflammation may explain neurocognitive impairment in HIV patients on antiretroviral drugs
Almost half of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART)-treated HIV patients experience some degree of neurocognitive impairment (neuroHIV).

NUS scientist develops 'toolboxes' for quantum cybersecurity
A quantum information scientist from the National University of Singapore has developed efficient 'toolboxes' comprising theoretical tools and protocols for quantifying the security of high-speed quantum communication.

Researchers discover resistance mechanism to checkpoint inhibitors and how to reverse it
Researchers have discovered a mechanism of resistance to checkpoint inhibitors and how to reverse it.

Guanidinium stabilizes perovskite solar cells at 19 percent efficiency
Incorporating guanidinium into perovskite solar cells stabilizes their efficiency at 19 percent for 1,000 hours under full-sunlight testing conditions.

In lab research, scientists slow progression of a fatal form of muscular dystrophy
Saint Louis University researchers report that a new drug reduces fibrosis (scarring) and prevents loss of muscle function in an animal model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD).

PARP inhibitor improves progression-free survival in patients with advanced breast cancers and BRCA
In a randomized, Phase III trial led by researchers at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, the PARP inhibitor talazoparib extended progression-free survival (PFS) and improved quality-of-life measures over available chemotherapies for patients with metastatic HER2-negative breast cancer and mutations in the BRCA1/2 genes.

New assay may help predict which pancreatic lesions may become cancerous
A report in The Journal of Molecular Diagnostics, describes a new simple molecular test to detect chromosomal abnormalities -- biomarkers known as telomere fusions -- in pancreatic tumor specimens and pancreatic cyst fluids.

Insights on fast cockroaches can help teach robots to walk
A study scientists from the University of Cologne have published in Frontiers in Zoology shows for the first time that fast insects can change their gait -- like a mammal's transition from trot to gallop.

nTIDE Nov 2017 Jobs Report: Ongoing job gains bode well for Americans with disabilities
The job outlook remained positive for Americans with disabilities, with yet another month of gains in the major economic indicators, according to today's National Trends in Disability Employment - Monthly Update (nTIDE), issued by Kessler Foundation and the University of New Hampshire's Institute on Disability (UNH-IOD).

Revolutionizing electronics using Kirigami
A research team in the Department of Electrical and Electronic Information Engineering and the Electronics-Inspired Interdisciplinary Research Institute (EIIRIS) at Toyohashi University of Technology has developed an ultrastretchable bioprobe using a 'Kirigami' designs.

What's in a name? How Taking a spouse's surname can define power in marriage
A new study led by a UNLV psychology professor shows that a wife's choice of surnames may influence perceptions of her husband's personality and the distribution of power in the marriage.

Scientists channel graphene to understand filtration and ion transport into cells
Researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology and their colleagues have demonstrated that nanometer-scale pores etched into layers of graphene can provide a simple model for the complex operation of ion channels.

Marine organisms can shred a carrier bag into 1.75 million pieces, study shows
A single plastic carrier bag could be shredded by marine organisms into 1.75 million microscopic fragments, according to new research published in Marine Pollution Bulletin and carried out by the University of Plymouth.

Study finds genetic mutation causes 'vicious cycle' in most common form of ALS
University of Michigan-led research brings scientists one step closer to understanding the development of neurodegenerative disorders such as ALS.

Study results offer another boon for PARP inhibitors in treatment of advanced breast cancer
Patients with certain advanced hereditary breast cancers may have new treatments options on the horizon, according to two studies presented this week at the annual San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium.

Boosting the antibiotic arsenal
MIT researchers have discovered a way to make bacteria more vulnerable to a class of antibiotics known as quinolones, which include ciprofloxacin and are often used to treat infections such as Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus.

How individuals with Schizophrenia view their experiences and confidence in judgments may influence
A schizophrenia patient's own perceptions of their experiences -- and confidence in their judgments -- may be factors that can help them overcome challenges to get the life they wish, suggests a new paper published in Clinical Psychological Science from researchers at Penn Medicine's Aaron T.

Children bear the brunt of secondhand smoke in Bangladesh
Children in Bangladesh are being exposed to high levels of secondhand smoke despite laws banning smoking in public spaces, a study carried out by the University of York suggests.

Family members without inherited mutation have increased risk of melanoma
In families who carry certain inherited mutations that increase the risk for melanoma, members who do not carry the mutation also have an increased risk of melanoma, a study from Karolinska Institutet published in Genetics in Medicine reports.

Sandy claws
Majoid crabs -- known as decorator crabs -- adorn themselves with items secured from their surroundings such as sponges, algae and other marine debris.

Surrey scientists create cheap and safe electro-catalysts for fuel cells
Scientists from the University of Surrey have produced non-metal electro-catalysts for fuel cells that could pave the way for production of low-cost, environmentally friendly energy generation.

New study shows HIV-infected women not using statins as recommended
A new study has shown that HIV-infected women do not use statins as recommended by the most recent guidelines.

Going undercover to fight tuberculosis
Tuberculosis is one of the most widespread life-threatening infectious diseases.

How developing visual system axons stay in the correct layer
Little is known about how axons in the developing visual system stabilize their connections upon reaching the correct layer, but scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech), led by Associate Professor Takashi Suzuki, have identified two proteins that provide layer-specific stabilization.

How a seahorse-shaped brain structure may help us recognize others
Study in mice reveals an oxytocin-sensitive brain circuit that regulates social memory formation, recognition Results shed light on brain's ability to sort out confusion by reconciling conflicting social stimuli Scientists map the neural pathway that relays social memories throughout various brain regions Findings propel understanding of anomalies in social behavior seen in neurodevelopmental, neurologic and psychiatric disorders.

Controlled burns limited severity of Rim Fire
Controlled burning of forestland helped limit the severity of one of California's largest wildfires, according to Penn State geographers.

Hot bodies are attractive
You might think that a hot object pushes atoms and molecules away due to radiation pressure.

Taurine lends hand to repair cells damaged in multiple sclerosis
New research suggests that administering taurine, a molecule naturally produced by human cells, could boost the effectiveness of current multiple sclerosis (MS) therapies.

For women with genetic risk, bi-annual MRI beats mammograms
Intensive surveillance including a dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) exam every six months was far more effective in detecting breast cancer in younger women with a high-risk genetic profile than an annual mammogram.

Many more bacteria have electrically conducting filaments
Microbiologists led by Derek Lovley at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, who is internationally known for having discovered electrically conducting microfilaments or 'nanowires' in the bacterium Geobacter, announce in a new paper this month that they have discovered the unexpected structures in many other species, greatly broadening the research field on electrically conducting filaments.

Physicists excited by discovery of new form of matter, excitonium
Excitonium has a team of researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign... well... excited!

Long-term prevention of organ rejection
The Konstanz immunologist Professor Marcus Groettrup and his team have developed a procedure for preventing organ rejection in rats after renal transplantation, and for suppressing the creation of antibodies in the recipients' immune systems.

Three kinds of information from a single X-ray measurement
The way in which electronic devices operate relies on the interaction between various materials.

Industrial Revolution left a damaging psychological 'imprint' on today's populations
Study finds people in UK and US areas historically reliant on coal-based industries have more 'negative' personality traits.

Report offers framework to guide decisions about Spirit Lake and Toutle River at Mount St. Helens
A new report from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine offers a framework to guide federal, tribal, state and local agencies, community groups, and other interested and affected parties in making decisions about the Spirit Lake and Toutle River system, near Mount St.

Acrobatic duo in the cells
Just like an acrobatic duo, some proteins lend each other stability.

Molecular beacon signals low oxygen with ultrasound
Areas of hypoxia, or low oxygen in tissue, are hallmarks of fast-growing cancers and of blockages or narrowing in blood vessels, such as stroke or peripheral artery disease.

Lymph node surgery may raise risk of arm morbidity in younger women
Younger breast cancer patients who underwent axillary lymph node dissection were more likely to experience arm swelling and decreased range of arm motion than patients who received sentinel lymph node biopsies, according to data presented at the 2017 San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium, held Dec.

Transformation to wind and solar achievable with low indirect GHG emissions
Different low carbon technologies from wind or solar energy to fossil carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) differ greatly when it comes to indirect GHG emissions in their life cycle.

Study reveals Viagra to be 'ineffective' for fetal growth restriction
A University of Liverpool led international clinical trial has found an anti-impotence drug to be ineffective at improving outcomes for pregnancies complicated by fetal growth restriction.

Including diagnosis related costs, 3-D mammography costs less than digital mammography
Although digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT), or 3-D mammography, costs more than a digital mammography (DM) screening, it actually may help rein in cancer screening costs, according to preliminary findings (PD7-05) presented by researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania during the 2017 San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium.

ECOG-ACRIN discovers a simple blood test may predict recurrence of breast cancer
Late recurrence five+ years after surgery accounts for at least half of all breast cancer recurrences.

USC researchers develop method to ensure human rights in public health services
When measuring the success of public health work -- from immunizations to family planning services -- experts rely on sets of standardized indicators.

Deep insight into the heart
The latest issue of the Forschung Frankfurt journal describes how modern non-invasive examinations using state-of-the-art imaging technology can reduce the risk of not-detecting infections of the heart muscle possibly leading to chronic inflammations and sudden death.

Large proportion of patients experiencing acute exacerbations of COPD are skipping out on pulmonary rehabilitation or not being referred all together
Researchers from Imperial College London set out to determine the effect of PR on COPD exacerbation rates.

Can data save dolphins?
After a collaboration between NASA scientists and marine biologists, new research rules out space weather as a primary cause of animal beachings.

New tool could help maintain quality during cheese production
Dutch type cheeses, notably edam and gouda, are made using complex starter cultures, that have been employed for centuries.

Extreme fieldwork, climate modeling yields new insight into predicting Greenland's melt
A new UCLA-led study brings together scientists from land hydrology, glaciology and climate modeling to unravel a meltwater mystery.
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.