Brightsurf Science News & Current Events

December 27, 2017
New guideline: Try exercise to improve memory, thinking
For patients with mild cognitive impairment, don't be surprised if your health care provider prescribes exercise rather than medication.

Is punishment as effective as we think?
Punishment might not be an effective means to get members of society to cooperate for the common good, according to a social dilemma experiment.

Referrals by private ERs are prevalent in communities with a public hospital
The practice of indirect referrals by nonpublic emergency departments and their affiliated physicians are prevalent in communities with a public hospital option.

Noninvasive brainwave technology improved post-traumatic stress symptoms in military
A noninvasive brainwave mirroring technology significantly reduced symptoms of post-traumatic stress in military personnel in a pilot study conducted at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center.

Biomarkers in breast cancer: IQWiG criticizes conclusion on MINDACT data in US guideline
In their updated guideline, US oncologists recently recommended the MammaPrint test.

The Iberian brown bears do not descend from those fled from the north during the Ice Age
According to the glacier refuges theory, after the last glaciations the bears of northern Europe sought shelter in the South.

Multidisciplinary approach to identifying and caring for ischemic stroke in young women
A multidisciplinary approach aimed at providing emergency physicians with a foundation of knowledge regarding ischemic stroke in young women and addressing the unique challenges in the evaluation and diagnosis of ischemic stroke in young women may improve outcomes for patients served in the ED.

Multimodal intervention can reduce PIVC insertion in the emergency department
Peripheral intravenous cannula (PIVC) insertion in the emergency department can be reduced using a multimodal approach designed to support critical thinking and promote clinically appropriate peripheral intravenous cannula insertion and use.

New understanding of why cancer cells move
A University of Hawai'i Cancer Center researcher has identified how some cancer cells are made to move during metastasis.

Does dosing of drug for mom make a difference for baby's risk of cleft lip, palate?
Taking a higher dose of topiramate during the first three months of pregnancy may increase a baby's risk of cleft lip or cleft palate more than when taking a lower dose, according to a study published in the Dec.

Study explores impact of obesity on bone marrow cells
New research published in the Journal of Experimental Medicine highlights the pernicious effect of obesity on the long-term health of blood-making stem cells (hematopoietic stem cells).

Callous and unemotional traits show in brain structure of boys only
Callous-unemotional traits are linked to differences in brain structure in boys, but not girls.

Wrens' calls reveal subtle differences between subspecies
Birds' songs and the ways they vary between places have been well studied--but what can the simpler vocalizations known as calls tell us about bird biology?

Bacteria acquire resistance from competitors
Bacteria not only develop resistance to antibiotics, they also can pick it up from their rivals.

Introducing internet-based testing for STIs doubles testing uptake in South London boroughs
Providing internet-based testing for Sexually Transmitted Infections (STIs) could increase the number of people being tested for syphilis, HIV, chlamydia and gonorrhoea, including among high-risk groups, according to a new study published in PLOS Medicine.

From C-H to C-C at room temperature
By oxidizing the iridium center of the reaction intermediate, IBS scientists achieve arylation of C-H bonds at mild conditions.

Local economic factors affect opioid prescribing to disabled Medicare beneficiaries
For non-elderly Americans on disability, local prescribing of opioid pain medications is significantly related to county-level economic factors like unemployment and income level, reports a study in the January issue of Medical Care, published by Wolters Kluwer.

Growing organs a few ink drops at a time
Osaka University researchers develop a finely tuned enzyme-driven crosslinking method to glue together biological ink droplets and extend the range of cell types that can be handled by inkjet bioprinting.

Project will provide reaction kinetics data for synthesis of metallic nanocrystals
Researchers have published the first part of what they expect to be a database showing the kinetics involved in producing colloidal metal nanocrystals -- which are suitable for catalytic, biomedical, photonic and electronic applications -- through an autocatalytic mechanism.

New model considers an extra factor to improve our prediction of nuclear fission
A research group based in a number of countries (Japan, Malaysia, Ukraine, and Germany), led by Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech), have proposed an improved model for predicting the generation of thermal energy from nuclear fission processes, by focusing on Uranium-236.

Veterinary surgeons perform first-known brain surgery to treat hydrocephalus in fur seal
A neurosurgical team at Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine at Tufts University has successfully performed what is believed to be a first-of-its-kind brain surgery on a Northern fur seal named Ziggy Star in an attempt to address her worsening neurologic condition.

Viewing atomic structures of dopant atoms in 3-D relating to electrical activity in a semiconductor
Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) and their research team involving researchers of JASRI, Osaka University, Nagoya Institute of Technology, and Nara Institute of Science and Technology have just developed a novel approach to determine and visualize the three-dimensional (3-D) structure of individual dopant atoms using SPring-8.

Prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of STIs: A PLOS medicine collection
This week PLOS Medicine launches the research content in our Collection on Prevention, Diagnosis, and Treatment of Sexually Transmitted Infections (STIs), advised by Guest Editors Nicola Low of the University of Bern, Switzerland and Nathalie Broutet of the World Health Organization (WHO).

Conserving coral communities
For years, people have sought to stop the loss of coral reefs by transplanting corals grown in underwater 'nurseries' to damaged reefs, but little work had been done to evaluate how effective such efforts were.

Guideline: Exercise may improve thinking ability and memory
Exercising twice a week may improve thinking ability and memory in people with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), according to a guideline released by the American Academy of Neurology.
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