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Science Current Events and Science News | Brightsurf | January 05, 2018


Scientists uncover why sauna bathing is good for your health
Scientists at the University of Eastern Finland have shown that sauna bathing is associated with a variety of health benefits.
Family Medicine and Community Health Journal Volume 5, Issue Number 4 publishes
The December 2017 issue includes an editorial, five original research articles, one case study, one systematic review and two China Focus articles addressing various topics in family medicine in both China and internationally.
Harnessing the potential of blockchain to transform education
Blockchain technology can help improve old models of data management and bring benefits to learners and educational institutions in the EU -- if policymakers are well prepared to embrace the change.
Tobacco shops associated with crime in urban communities of color
Tobacco shops, also known as smoke shops, may represent potential 'nuisance properties' in urban communities of color, a study led by a researcher at the University of California, Riverside has found.
First discover the disorder and then find the patients
Biochemists of Bielefeld University have confirmed the cause of initially unclear symptoms of patients in Israel.
NASA catches Tropical Cyclone Ava's landfall on Madagascar's coast
NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over Tropical Cyclone Ava as it made landfall along the coast of northeastern Madagascar.
Taking paracetamol during pregnancy may reduce fertility of daughters
Taking paracetamol during pregnancy may impair the future fertility of female offspring, according to a review published in Endocrine Connections.
Room-temperature multiferroic thin films and their properties
Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) and Tohoku University have developed high-quality GFO epitaxial films and systematically investigated their ferroelectric and ferromagnetic properties.
Temperature may affect pollen color
While studies on flowers' petal-color variation abound, new research looks at differences in the performance of pollen under varied environmental conditions based on its color.
Radiation therapy algorithm could reduce side effects, maintain effect against tumors
A mathematical model for computing radiation therapy treatments could substantially reduce patient side effects while delivering the same results as conventional radiation therapy.
In Antarctic dry valleys, early signs of climate change-induced shifts in soil
In a study spanning two decades, a team of researchers found declining numbers of soil fauna, nematodes and other animal species in the McMurdo Dry Valleys, one of the world's driest and coldest deserts.
Batman's Gotham City provides test case for community resilience model
If a community is resilient, it can withstand and recover from an unanticipated disaster, like an earthquake, fire or flood.
Proceed to checkout? Not on your mobile, say researchers
Shoppers hoping to bag a bargain in the post-Christmas sales are much less likely to go through with their purchases if they are using phones and tablets to buy goods online.
Geopolitical risks to US oil supply lowest since the early 1970s
The geopolitical risks to the United States' oil supply are the lowest since the early 1970s, due to fracking, climate action and a more diverse global supply, according to a new paper by experts at Rice University's Baker Institute for Public Policy.
Quantum 'spooky action at a distance' becoming practical
Scientists from Griffith University have overcome a major challenge in applying a strange quantum effect to real applications.
Cells rank genes by importance to protect them, according to new research
Researchers at the University of Oxford have discovered that a cellular mechanism preferentially protects plant genes from the damaging effects of mutation.
Researchers unlocking potential for next-generation medical scanning
While still in the early stages, research reported today in the journal Science Advances has made significant steps towards a new MRI method with the potential to enable doctors to personalise life-saving medical treatments and allow real-time imaging to take place in locations such as operating theatres and GP practices.
Study boosts hope for cheaper fuel cells
Simulations by Rice University scientists show how carbon nanomaterials may be optimized to replace expensive platinum in cathodes for electricity-generating fuel cells.
Excess fat disrupts heart cell's energy system
A University of Iowa study finds that lipid overload in heart cells, a common feature in diabetes and obesity, leads to misshapen mitochondria that don't produce energy efficiently.
Landmark genetic study better predicts stomach cancer
Although stomach cancer is treatable if detected early, diagnosis often occurs at an advanced stage, resulting in high mortality.
Molecular imaging technique identifies lung nodules for resection in osteosarcoma patient
Utility of near-infrared molecular imaging in a patient undergoing pulmonary metastasectomy for osteosarcoma has been reported by researchers from Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania and Purdue University.
Scientists find culprits for extreme rainfall over Yangtze River in May 2016
Chinese and British scientists used the 'Risk Ratio' (RR), a probabilistic extreme event attribution approach, to characterize the anthropogenic contribution to the occurrence of the extreme event and found the strong El Niño of 2015-16 may account for the extreme precipitation event over Yangtze River basin in 2016.
Mirror neuron activity predicts people's decision-making in moral dilemmas
Mirror neuron activity predicts certain decisions in the face of moral dilemmas; findings could one day benefit people with mental disorders that make social communication difficult
Study shows treeshrews break evolutionary 'rules'
According to a study published in the journal Ecology and Evolution, Tupaia glis, the common treeshrew, defies two widely tested rules that describe patterns of geographical variation within species: the island rule and Bergmann's rule.
University of Montana publishes research on unusual gene evolution in bacteria
University of Montana researchers have made another discovery at the cellular level to help understand the basic processes of all life on our planet -- this time within the unusual bacteria that has lived inside cicada insects since dinosaurs roamed Earth.
New tool to assess largely ignored risk in pharmaceutical industry
A new method to test the likelihood of a drug turning into a potentially harmful version of itself when it enters the body has been developed by researchers at Cardiff University.
Inattentional blindness
Drivers' limited capacity to process the myriad details they absorb could explain why they sometimes fail to avoid crashes with motorcycles.
Space fever: Weightlessness increases astronauts' body temperature
Astronauts float weightlessly through space, and the condition of weightlessness is something many would love to experience.
Use of mobile devices at home can carry conflict to workplace, UTA study says
A University of Texas at Arlington researcher is part of a team of authors who have found that using a mobile device at home for work purposes has negative implications for the employee's work life and also their spouse.
Penn study on super-silenced DNA hints at new ways to reprogram cells
Newly described stretches of super-silenced DNA reveal a fresh approach to reprogram cell identity to use in regenerative medicine studies and one day in the clinic.
In scientific first, IU researchers grow hairy skin in a dish
Researchers at Indiana University School of Medicine have successfully developed a method to grow hairy skin from mouse pluripotent stem cells -- a discovery that could lead to new approaches to model disease and new therapies for the treatment of skin disorders and cancers.
The CSI effect: Viewing TV crime shows does not make better criminals
In an experimental study, the German researchers have been able to find no evidence of a correlation between watching forensic science TV shows and the ability to get away with committing a crime.
Immune response to Zika virus contributes to fetal harm
The same proteins that mount a potent immune response to Zika viral infection can also harm the placenta and fetal development, according to a Yale-led study published in Science Immunology.
Depression in black adolescents requires different treatment
Black adolescents express depressive symptoms differently than people from other age and racial groups, requiring that clinicians take this into account when developing treatment plans, according to a new study led by a Rutgers University-Camden researcher.
Research paves the way for treatment strategies of multidrug-resistant chronic infections
A new study published in Cell Press finds that antibiotic treatment of chronic infections can be optimized by targeting vulnerabilities of antibiotic-resistant pathogens paving the way for more effective treatment strategies.
Preventing and treating acute chest syndrome in children with sickle cell disease
Acute chest syndrome (ACS), a potentially severe lung complication of sickle cell disease, increases a child's risk of respiratory failure, chronic lung disease, and prolonged hospitalization if not recognized early and treated effectively.
How Zika infection drives fetal demise
An interferon cell receptor spurs cell suicide in fetuses infected with the Zika virus and could play a role in certain pregnancy complications.
Special star is a Rosetta Stone for understanding the sun's variability and climate effect
A large international team of scientists has found a star that can help shed light on the physics underlying the solar dynamo.
Ultrafine fibers have exceptional strength
MIT researchers have developed a process to produce ultrafine fibers -- whose width is measured in nanometers -- that are exceptionally strong, tough, inexpensive, and easy to produce, and could be choice materials for many applications, such as protective armor.
Ocean acidification means major changes for California mussels, FSU researcher says
Accelerating ocean acidification could be transforming the fundamental structure of California mussel shells, according to a new report from a Florida State University-led team of scientists.

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