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Science Current Events and Science News | Brightsurf | January 12, 2018


New epidemiological study finds no connection between cases of cancer and use of plant protection products containing glyphosate
BfR Communication No. 036/2017 from 22 December 2017 Epidemiological studies are a central element of public discussion in the debate surrounding the carcinogenic potential of glyphosate.
Scarring molecule in fat tissue links obesity with distressed fat
The fat of obese people becomes distressed, scarred and inflamed, which can make weight loss more difficult, research at the University of Exeter has found.
Asthma costs the US economy more than $80 billion per year
Asthma costs the US economy more than $80 billion annually in medical expenses, missed work and school days and deaths, according to new research published online in the Annals of the American Thoracic Society.
Veterans who learn Transcendental Meditation find relief from PTSD, new study shows
A study published in Military Medicine showed that after 30 days of practicing the Transcendental Meditation technique, 80 percent of the 46 veterans and active-duty personnel no longer had PTSD.
Genetic analysis can improve depression therapy
The failure of SSRI antidepressants can be a result of genetic variations in patients.
Digital technology is helping women to explore their sexuality
Women who consume Internet pornography are using technology to explore their sexuality and connect with others to discuss their sexual interests, according to research from the University of Waterloo.
Research suggests Trump's 'Muslim ban' produced rare shift in public opinion
Visible resistance to Executive Order 13769, commonly referred to the 'Muslim ban,' may have produced a rare shift in public opinion caused by 'an influx of information portraying the ban as being at odds with egalitarian principles of American identity and religious liberty,' said researchers Loren Collingwood of the University of California, Riverside; Nazita Lajevardi of Michigan State University; and Kassra A.
The negative impact of climate change on freshwater bodies
A lot of research is being conducted into the acidification of the world's oceans.
Can Muesli help against arthritis?
It is well known that healthy eating increases our general sense of wellbeing.
Past exposures shape immune response in pediatric acute respiratory infections
By analyzing immune cells of children who came to the emergency department with flu symptoms, researchers found that the suite of genes these early-response cells expressed was shaped by factors such as age and previous exposures to viruses.
Expert unlocks mechanics of how snakes move in a straight line
University of Cincinnati biologist Bruce Jayne studied the mechanics of snake movement to understand exactly how they can propel themselves forward like a train through a tunnel.
Nanostructure boosts stability of organic thin-film transistors
A nanostructured gate dielectric may have addressed the most significant obstacle to expanding the use of organic semiconductors for thin-film transistors.
Anxiety: An early indicator of Alzheimer's disease?
A new study suggests an association between elevated amyloid beta levels & the worsening of anxiety symptoms.
Cancer's gene-determined 'immune landscape' dictates progression of prostate tumors
The field of immunotherapy -- the harnessing of patients' own immune systems to fend off cancer -- is revolutionizing cancer treatment today.
Researchers offer new model for uncovering true HIV mortality rates in Zambia
A new study that seeks to better ascertain HIV mortality rates in Zambia could provide a model for improved national and regional surveillance approaches, and ultimately, more effective HIV treatment strategies.
Black hole spin cranks-up radio volume
Statistical analysis of supermassive black holes suggests that the spin of the black hole may play a role in the generation of powerful high-speed jets blasting radio waves.
New warning system discovered in the immune defence
Researchers at Linköping University in Sweden have discovered a previously unknown warning system that contributes to the body's immune system.
Penn-led team uncovers the physiology behind the hour-long mating call of midshipman fish
A new study led by University of Pennsylvania researchers provides an explanation for how Pacific midshipman fish can generate a mating call that emits continuously from their bodies for a full hour, entailing 360,000 muscle contractions.
An innovative PET tracer can measure damage from multiple sclerosis in mouse models
In the Jan. 12, 2018, Scientific Reports, a research team describes early tests of a minimally-invasive way to assess myelin damage -- the hallmark of multiple sclerosis -- using positron emission tomography (PET).
Does an exploding brain network cause chronic pain?
New research reports that hyperreactive brain networks could play a part in the hypersensitivity of fibromyalgia.
Stingray soft robot could lead to bio-inspired robotics
UCLA bioengineering professor Ali Khademhosseini has led the development of a tissue-based soft robot that mimics the biomechanics of a stingray.
How climate change alters plant growth
Global warming affects more than just plant biodiversity -- it even alters the way plants grow.
Pitt study suggests risk management approach to combat EMS fatigue
Extended shift work has historically been linked to interrupted sleep patterns and risk of injury, and is a persistent problem for emergency medical services (EMS) personnel who are tasked with delivering acute care under significant pressure.
Newborn Immune Activation May Have Long-Term Negative Impact on Brain FunctionNewborn immune activation may have long-term negative impact on brain function
McLean neuroscientists have found that even a brief episode of immune system activation within days of birth can cause persistent changes in sleep patterns concurrent with increases in epilepsy-like brain activity -- a combination of symptoms common in autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and other developmental conditions.
Can early symptoms predict bipolar disorder? Evidence shows differing patterns of risk factors
Two patterns of antecedent or 'prodromal' psychiatric symptoms may help to identify young persons at increased risk of developing bipolar disorder (BD), according to a new analysis in the Harvard Review of Psychiatry.
Jet stream changes since 1960s linked to more extreme weather
Increased fluctuations in the path of the North Atlantic jet stream since the 1960s coincide with more extreme weather events in Europe such as heat waves, wildfires and flooding.
Don't let skiing and snowboarding injuries take you downhill
Skiing and snowboarding are fun winter sports. As the popularity of these winter sports continue to rise, according to a review article published in the Jan.
Scientists identify a key mechanism regulating a protein required for muscle and heart function
Scientists at the CNIC and Columbia University have identified a new mechanism regulating the elasticity of titin, a protein with important roles in the function of skeletal and heart muscle.
Species identification in the water bottle
Environmental DNA analysis makes it possible to detect water organisms without having to capture them first.
Quantum leap: computational approach launches new paradigm in electronic structure theory
A group of Michigan State University researchers specializing in quantum calculations has proposed a radically new computational approach to solving the complex many-particle Schrödinger equation, which holds the key to explaining the motion of electrons in atoms and molecules.
Surprising discovery could lead to better batteries
A collaboration led by scientists at Brookhaven has observed the concentration of lithium inside individual nanoparticles reverse at a certain point, instead of constantly increasing.
Age is not a risk factor for complications after surgery among older patients
Among older patients, frailty and cognitive impairment before surgery are associated with developing complications after surgery, but age is not, a new study suggests.
A society divided by reconstruction
In 2004, a tsunami devastated much of the Indonesian city of Banda Aceh.
Researcher discovers commonalities in brains of people with HD and PD
A new study strongly suggests that the brains of people who have died of Huntington's disease (HD) and Parkinson's disease (PD) show a similar response to a lifetime of neurodegeneration, despite being two very distinct diseases.
Maintaining canola oil quality
Canola and other edible oils are easily affected by light irradiation or heat treatment.
Research shows importance of second pediatric blood-pressure screening
Nearly one-quarter of children and teens who had their blood pressure screened at a primary care appointment showed a reading in the hypertensive range, but less than half of those readings could be confirmed after the blood pressure was repeated, according to a new Kaiser Permanente study released today in The Journal of Clinical Hypertension.
New therapeutic approach for advanced lung disease
Researchers have demonstrated the potential of a new class of drugs for the treatment of refractory chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, i.e.
New method to map miniature brain circuits
In a feat of nanoengineering, scientists have developed a new technique to map electrical circuits in the brain far more comprehensively than ever before.
Tropical Cyclone Joyce makes landfall on Australia's Pilbara Coast
NOAA's JPSS-1 satellite provided a visible image of the tropical storm after it made landfall along the Pilbara Coast in the northwestern part of Western Australia.
Russian scientists found excitons in nickel oxide for the first time
'We first found excitons with charge transfer at the boundary of fundamental adsorption in nickel oxide and at the impurity adsorption edge in magnesium oxide.
Thinking outside the box on climate mitigation
A new article lays the groundwork for alternative climate mitigation scenarios that place less reliance on unproven negative emissions technologies in the future.
How far to the nearest city? Global map of travel time to cities published
The Joint Research Centre, the European Commission's science and knowledge service, provided expert input on the mapping of urban accessibility worldwide to support global and local decision-making on development and environmental policies.
Scleroderma study: Hope for a longer life for patients with rare autoimmune disorder
The approach could represent the first new treatment to improve survival in patients with severe scleroderma in more than four decades.
The combination of two proteins exerts a regenerating effect in Parkinson's disease
Current therapies for Parkinson's disease are mainly of a replacement type and pose problems in the long term, so the challenge is to establish an early diagnosis and develop neuroprotective and neurorestorative therapies that will allow the symptoms of the disease to be slowed down or even reversed.
Print a 200-million-year-old dinosaur fossil in your own home
The digital reconstruction of the skull of a 200-million-year-old South African dinosaur, Massospondylus, has made it possible for researchers to make 3-D prints and in this way facilitate research on other dinosaurs all over the world.
Scientists identify genes implicated in the high regenerative capacity of embryos and ESCs
Researchers at Insilico Medicine , AgeX Therapeutics and the Biogerontology Research Foundation have published a landmark study titled 'Use of deep neural network ensembles to identify embryonic-fetal transition markers: repression of COX7A1 in embryonic and cancer cells' in the journal Oncotarget.
First method to detect illicit drone filming developed
'The beauty of this research is that someone using only a laptop and an object that flickers can detect if someone is using a drone to spy on them,' says Ben Nassi, a Ph.D. student in the BGU Department of Software and Information Systems Engineering and a researcher at the BGU Cyber Security Research Center (CSRC).

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