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Science Current Events and Science News | Brightsurf | January 21, 2018


Alcohol consumption in late teens can lead to liver problems in adulthood
Alcohol is the leading cause of liver cirrhosis and liver-related deaths.
Human smugglers operate as 'independent traders,' study finds
First study to model the organizations behind trade in illegal border crossings shows no 'Mafia-like' monopoly of routes from Africa into Europe.
Changing GP opening hours might be unlikely to ease rising burden of A&E visits
A new study has found no correlation between satisfaction with GP opening hours and the number of visits to A&E in England.
Study of learning and memory problems in OCD helps young people unlock potential at school
Adolescents with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) have widespread learning and memory problems, according to research published today.
The world's most powerful acoustic tractor beam could pave the way for levitating humans
Acoustic tractor beams use the power of sound to hold particles in mid-air, and unlike magnetic levitation, they can grab most solids or liquids even small insects.
Epilepsy linked to brain volume and thickness differences
Epilepsy is associated with thickness and volume differences in the grey matter of several brain regions, according to new research led by UCL and the Keck School of Medicine of USC.

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#537 Science Journalism, Hold the Hype
Everyone's seen a piece of science getting over-exaggerated in the media. Most people would be quick to blame journalists and big media for getting in wrong. In many cases, you'd be right. But there's other sources of hype in science journalism. and one of them can be found in the humble, and little-known press release. We're talking with Chris Chambers about doing science about science journalism, and where the hype creeps in. Related links: The association between exaggeration in health related science news and academic press releases: retrospective observational study Claims of causality in health news: a randomised trial This...