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Science Current Events and Science News | Brightsurf | February 04, 2018


When did flowers originate?
Flowering plants likely originated between 149 and 256 million years ago according to new UCL-led research.
Old drug may have new tricks for fighting cancer
Results show that the drug ibrutinib acts as a potent kinase inhibitor for ERBB4, limits growth in human cancer cells in the laboratory, and reduces tumor size in mice.
Multinational companies continue to produce unregulated antibiotics in India
Millions of unapproved antibiotics are being sold in India, according to a new study by researchers at Queen Mary University of London and Newcastle University.
Ribosomes found to induce somatic cell pluripotency
In 2012, a Japanese research group discovered that human skin cells acquire pluripotency when introduced to lactic acid bacteria (Lactobacillus acidophilus).
New genome-editing method 'cuts back' on unwanted genetic mutations
Gene therapy can potentially correct genetic disorders by directly editing defective genes.
Treatment of nitrogen-polluted sediment using marine anammox bacteria
Working on a way to alleviate eutrophication in coastal waters, a research collaboration between Kumamoto University in Japan and the Virginia Institute of Marine Science (VIMS) in the US have found a combination of bacteria with the potential to lighten the impact of excess nitrogen found in many coastal water systems.

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
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Don't Fear Math
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#518 With Genetic Knowledge Comes the Need for Counselling
This week we delve into genetic testing - for yourself and your future children. We speak with Jane Tiller, lawyer and genetic counsellor, about genetic tests that are available to the public, and what to do with the results of these tests. And we talk with Noam Shomron, associate professor at the Sackler School of Medicine at Tel Aviv University, about technological advancements his lab has made in the genetic testing of fetuses.