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Science Current Events and Science News | Brightsurf | February 04, 2018


When did flowers originate?
Flowering plants likely originated between 149 and 256 million years ago according to new UCL-led research.
Old drug may have new tricks for fighting cancer
Results show that the drug ibrutinib acts as a potent kinase inhibitor for ERBB4, limits growth in human cancer cells in the laboratory, and reduces tumor size in mice.
Multinational companies continue to produce unregulated antibiotics in India
Millions of unapproved antibiotics are being sold in India, according to a new study by researchers at Queen Mary University of London and Newcastle University.
Ribosomes found to induce somatic cell pluripotency
In 2012, a Japanese research group discovered that human skin cells acquire pluripotency when introduced to lactic acid bacteria (Lactobacillus acidophilus).
New genome-editing method 'cuts back' on unwanted genetic mutations
Gene therapy can potentially correct genetic disorders by directly editing defective genes.
Treatment of nitrogen-polluted sediment using marine anammox bacteria
Working on a way to alleviate eutrophication in coastal waters, a research collaboration between Kumamoto University in Japan and the Virginia Institute of Marine Science (VIMS) in the US have found a combination of bacteria with the potential to lighten the impact of excess nitrogen found in many coastal water systems.

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Now Playing: Science for the People

#537 Science Journalism, Hold the Hype
Everyone's seen a piece of science getting over-exaggerated in the media. Most people would be quick to blame journalists and big media for getting in wrong. In many cases, you'd be right. But there's other sources of hype in science journalism. and one of them can be found in the humble, and little-known press release. We're talking with Chris Chambers about doing science about science journalism, and where the hype creeps in. Related links: The association between exaggeration in health related science news and academic press releases: retrospective observational study Claims of causality in health news: a randomised trial This...