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Science Current Events and Science News | Brightsurf | February 04, 2018


When did flowers originate?
Flowering plants likely originated between 149 and 256 million years ago according to new UCL-led research.
Old drug may have new tricks for fighting cancer
Results show that the drug ibrutinib acts as a potent kinase inhibitor for ERBB4, limits growth in human cancer cells in the laboratory, and reduces tumor size in mice.
Multinational companies continue to produce unregulated antibiotics in India
Millions of unapproved antibiotics are being sold in India, according to a new study by researchers at Queen Mary University of London and Newcastle University.
Ribosomes found to induce somatic cell pluripotency
In 2012, a Japanese research group discovered that human skin cells acquire pluripotency when introduced to lactic acid bacteria (Lactobacillus acidophilus).
New genome-editing method 'cuts back' on unwanted genetic mutations
Gene therapy can potentially correct genetic disorders by directly editing defective genes.
Treatment of nitrogen-polluted sediment using marine anammox bacteria
Working on a way to alleviate eutrophication in coastal waters, a research collaboration between Kumamoto University in Japan and the Virginia Institute of Marine Science (VIMS) in the US have found a combination of bacteria with the potential to lighten the impact of excess nitrogen found in many coastal water systems.

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#530 Why Aren't We Dead Yet?
We only notice our immune systems when they aren't working properly, or when they're under attack. How does our immune system understand what bits of us are us, and what bits are invading germs and viruses? How different are human immune systems from the immune systems of other creatures? And is the immune system so often the target of sketchy medical advice? Those questions and more, this week in our conversation with author Idan Ben-Barak about his book "Why Aren't We Dead Yet?: The Survivor’s Guide to the Immune System".