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Science Current Events and Science News | Brightsurf | February 09, 2018


Special UV light safely kills airborne flu virus, finds study
Overhead far-UVC light, a type of ultraviolet light that is harmless to humans, effectively killed airborne flu virus, found researchers at Columbia University.
Organic food provides significant environmental benefits to plant-rich diets
A study of the diets of 34,000 people confirms that a diet high in fruit and vegetables is better for the planet than one high in animal products.
New images reveal how the ear's sensory hairs take shape
Our ability to hear relies on tiny bundles of hair-like sensors inside the inner ear.
Aerial imagery gives insight into water trends
USU researchers say aerial images taken from drones or helicopters are just as accurate as more conventional field methods used for estimating river discharge.
Researchers discover efficient and sustainable way to filter salt and metal ions from water
With two billion people worldwide lacking access to clean and safe drinking water, joint research by Monash University, CSIRO and the University of Texas at Austin published today in Sciences Advances may offer a breakthrough new solution.
Routine imaging scans may predict fracture risk in older adults
Routine body CT scans may help clinicians estimate an individual's risk of future osteoporotic fracture, according to new study results published in the Journal of Bone and Mineral Research.
Clock protein controls daily cycle of gene expression by regulating chromosome loops
It's well known that the human body functions on a 24-hour schedule.
Workplace stress can take a toll on your brain surgeon, too
A new study by the Keck School of Medicine of USC finds that two-thirds of neurosurgeons experience burnout during training, and stressors at work are partly to blame.
Measurements from 3-D augmented reality holographic models shown to be highly accurate
Measurements taken on projected augmented reality 3-D holographic models were shown to be essentially as accurate as 'gold standard' measurements and nearly approaching that of PACS measurements, according to a study to be presented at the ARRS 2018 Annual Meeting, set for April 22-27 in Washington, D.C.
Direct link between glands and implanting embryos critical to pregnancy
Researchers used 3-D imaging with molecular testing to uncover new insight into the earliest stages of mammalian pregnancy -- offering clues to unsolved questions in pregnancy.
Tropical Storm watch up in Guam, NASA sees 02W form
Tropical Depression 02W formed in the Northwestern Pacific Ocean late on February 8 as NASA's Terra satellite passed overhead.
New findings about why losartan is effective in treating Marfan syndrome may reshape our thinking about patient management
Progressive dilation of the aortic root is considered one of the most serious manifestations of Marfan syndrome.
Metals known to have harmful health effects found in indigenous exposed to oil spills
People from two indigenous communities in the Peruvian Amazon who live close to the country's longest oil pipeline have mercury, cadmium and lead in their bodies at concentrations that could be harmful to their health.
NASA finds heaviest rainfall in Tropical Cyclone Gita's northern quadrant
NASA's GPM core satellite examined rainfall in Tropical Cyclone Gita soon after the storm came together.
Chemist designs diabetic treatment minus harmful side effects
Syracuse University professor Robert Doyle has figured out how to control glucose levels in the bloodstream without the usual side effects of nausea, vomiting or malaise.
Blood test plus ultrasound boosts liver cancer detection by 40 percent
Combining ultrasound imaging with a blood test for high alpha fetoprotein (AFP) levels improves detection of early-stage liver cancer by as much as 40 percent, researchers at UT Southwestern's Simmons Cancer Center found.
New discovery offers hope of protecting premature babies from blindness
Now there is hope of a new way to protect extremely premature babies from impaired vision or blindness resulting from the eye disease retinopathy of prematurity (ROP).
Study shows liver cells with whole genome duplications protect against cancer
Researchers at the Children's Medical Center Research Institute (CRI) at UT Southwestern have discovered that cells in the liver with whole genome duplications, known as polyploid cells, can protect the liver against cancer.
Mass production of new class of semiconductors closer to reality
Two Waterloo chemists have made it easier for manufacturers to produce a new class of faster and cheaper semiconductors.
Discharge strategies to prevent asthma readmissions
'Improving how we care for children who are hospitalized with asthma includes preparing them for a successful return home with the best tools to manage their illness and prevent a future hospital visit,' says Kavita Parikh, M.D., M.S.H.S.
New study highlights the impact companion animals have on owners
A new study, published in BMC Psychiatry, conducted by researchers from the universities of Liverpool, Manchester and Southampton, suggests that pets provide benefits to those with mental health conditions.
Giant lava dome confirmed in Japan's Kikai Caldera
Researchers have confirmed that a giant lava dome was created in the Kikai Caldera, south of Japan's main islands after the caldera-forming supereruption 7,300 years ago.
New lithium collection method could boost global supply
With continual technological advancements in mobile devices and electric cars, the global demand for lithium has quickly outpaced the rate at which it can be mined or recycled, but a University of Texas at Austin professor and his research team may have a solution.
Small gold mines in Senegal create high mercury contamination
A Duke-led study has found high levels of mercury and methylmercury in soils, sediments and rivers near artisanal gold mines in Senegal.
McMaster University engineers make drug testing more efficient and affordable
McMaster University engineers have devised a way to make testing for new drugs more efficient and affordable, and reduce the time for helpful medications to reach the public.
Salk researchers discover how liver responds so quickly to food
Salk researchers have uncovered how the liver can have a speedy response to food; liver cells store up pre-RNA molecules involved in glucose and fat metabolism.
Drivers of hate in the US have distinct regional differences
In a new study, University of Utah geographers sought to understand the factors fueling hate across space.
Simple tests may predict older patients' risk of falling while hospitalized
Simple Tests May Predict Older Patients' Risk of Falling While Hospitalized A study of 807 older individuals admitted to hospital found that those who had poorer physical function at the time of admission were more likely to fall during their hospital stay; 329 falls occurred in 189 patients, including 161 injurious falls, of which 24 were serious.
Study: Many parents of children with disabilities don't make care plans
Many parents of children with disabilities don't make advance care plans in the event of the parent's or other caretaker's death or disability, according to a new nationwide survey by special education professor Meghan Burke at the University of Illinois.
New malleable 'electronic skin' self-healable, recyclable
University of Colorado Boulder researchers have developed a new type of malleable, self-healing and fully recyclable 'electronic skin' that has applications ranging from robotics and prosthetic development to better biomedical devices.
Scientists create functioning kidney tissue
Scientists have successfully produced human kidney tissue within a living organism which is able to produce urine, a first for medical science.
Few-layer Tellurium was predicted to be a promising successor of black phosphorus
Mono-elementary semiconductors have unique advantages in terms of their chemical simplicity.
Forging a quantum leap in quantum communication
The major drawback of quantum communication today is the slow speed of data transfer, which is limited by the speed at which the parties can perform quantum measurements.
Stacking on the graphene
Tohoku University researchers have fabricated two types of trilayer graphene with different electrical properties.
NIH scientists adapt new brain disease test for Parkinson's, dementia with Lewy bodies
NIH scientists have modified a test for early diagnosis of prion diseases with the goal of improving early diagnosis of Parkinson's disease and dementia with Lewy bodies.
Microscopic chariots deliver molecules within our cells
Understanding how the dynein-dynactin complex is assembled and organized provides a critical foundation to explain the underlying causes of several dynein-related neurodegenerative diseases.
Researchers discover another reason for the naked mole rats' long, cancer-free life
A new international study has identified clues concerning the cellular processes that contribute to the naked mole rat's resistance to cancer.
Chinese researchers report first lung stem cell transplantation clinical trial
A research team from Tongji University in China have made a breakthrough in human lung regeneration technology.
Device that measures cell strength could help identify drugs for asthma, hypertension
Engineers, doctors and scientists at UCLA and Rutgers University have developed a tool that measures the physical strength of individual cells 100 times faster than current technologies.
Chicken pox vaccine linked with shingles at the vaccination site in some children
New research in Pediatric Dermatology reports several cases of shingles that developed at the original vaccination site in healthy children after they were immunized against chicken pox.
Your gadget's next power supply? Your body
Searching for a power outlet may soon become a thing of the past.
Acoustic nanomotors
In cancer research, the 'Cas-9-sgRNA' complex is an effective genomic editing tool, but its delivery across the cell membrane to the target (tumor) genome has not yet been satisfactorily solved.
How the brain constructs the world
How are raw sensory signals transformed into a brain representation of the world that surrounds us?
Soft chemotherapy is very effective in older patients when added to targeted treatment in an aggressive breast cancer subtype
A trial published todayin The Lancet Oncology, shows that, in older patients with HER2 positive metastatic breast cancer (an aggressive breast cancer subtype where the cancer has spread to other parts of the body), a combination of a 'soft' chemotherapy with antiHER2 therapy is highly active and has low toxicity, important in a frail population.
Early treatment decisions can alter the course of care for acute pancreatitis patients
Management and treatment decisions made within the first 48 to 72 hours of hospital admission for acute pancreatitis patients can significantly alter the course of disease and duration of hospitalization.
UChicago astrophysicists settle cosmic debate on magnetism of planets and stars
Using one of the world's most powerful laser facilities, a team led by University of Chicago scientists experimentally confirmed a long-held theory for cosmic magnetic field generation: the turbulent dynamo.
Efficient technique discovered for isolating embryonic stem cells in cows
Scientists at the University of California, Davis, have developed a highly efficient method of isolating embryonic stem cells in cows.
Water-soluble warped nanographene
Graphene and its nano-sized little sibling, nanographene, are well known for their remarkable photoelectronic properties.
Ultra-efficient removal of carbon monoxide using gold nanoparticles on a molecular support
Researchers from Tokyo Metropolitan University have developed a way to mount gold nanoparticles on a molecular support known as a polyoxometalate (POM).
A super resolution view of chemical reactions
Researchers from the Institute of Physical Chemistry of the Polish Academy of Sciences have demonstrated, using a super resolution microscopic technique, how to follow chemical reactions taking place in very small volumes.
Research uncovers the mysterious lives of narwhals
Narwhals are some of the most elusive creatures in the ocean, spending most of their lives in deep water far from shore.
New process allows 3-D printing of nanoscale metal structures
By mixing metal ions and organic ligands, a team led by Julia Greer has developed a process for the 3-D printing of metal structures that are smaller than ever before.

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