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Science Current Events and Science News | Brightsurf | February 17, 2018


Research team uncovers hidden details in Picasso Blue Period painting
A partnership of the Northwestern University/Art Institute of Chicago Center for Scientific Studies in the Arts, the Art Gallery of Ontario and the National Gallery of Art has used multiple modes of light to uncover details hidden beneath the visible surface of Pablo Picasso's painting 'La Miséreuse accroupie', a major work from the artist's Blue Period.
Newborn babies who suffered stroke regain language function in opposite side of brain
A stroke in a baby -- even a big one -- does not have the same lasting impact as a stroke in an adult.
To sleep, perchance to forget
People and other animals sicken and die if they are deprived of sleep, but why is sleep so essential?
Understanding roots opens students to science, diversity
Focusing science education on students through genetic and genealogical studies may be the way to increase minorities in the pipeline and engage students who would otherwise deem science too hard or too uninteresting, according to a Penn State anthropologist.
Japanese researchers develop ultrathin, highly elastic skin display
A new ultrathin, elastic display that fits snugly on the skin can show the moving waveform of an electrocardiogram recorded by a breathable, on-skin electrode sensor.
Unprecedented study of Picasso's bronzes uncovers new details
Musee national Picasso-Paris and the Northwestern University/Art Institute of Chicago Center for Scientific Studies in the Arts have completed the first major material survey and study of the Musee national Picasso-Paris' Pablo Picasso bronzes using portable instruments.
Stretchable electronics a 'game changer' for stroke recovery treatment
A first-of-its-kind sensor that sticks to the throat and measures speech and swallowing patterns could be a game-changer in the field of stroke rehabilitation.
Asteroid 'time capsules' may help explain how life started on Earth
In popular culture, asteroids play the role of apocalyptic threat, get blamed for wiping out the dinosaurs -- and offer an extraterrestrial source for mineral mining.
New study sheds light on illegal global trade of pangolins
Animal traffickers are taking advantage of remote ivory trade routes to smuggle pangolins -- one of the world's most endangered animals -- out of Central Africa, a new study has found.
Personalized curriculum captures students' imagination, interest
Focusing on their personal DNA and genealogies, middle school students appear to have learned as much as their peers who used case studies, according to a Penn State researcher.

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