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Science News | Science Current Events | Brightsurf | February 18, 2018


Why bees soared and slime flopped as inspirations for systems engineering
Honeybees gathering nectar inspired an algorithm that eased the burden of host servers handling unpredictable traffic by about 25 percent.
The new bioenergy research center: building on ten years of success
The Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center (GLBRC), led by the University of Wisconsin-Madison, recently embarked on a new mission: to develop sustainable alternatives to transportation fuels and products currently derived from petroleum.
What makes circadian clocks tick?
Circadian clocks arose as an adaptation to dramatic swings in daylight hours and temperature caused by the Earth's rotation, but we still don't fully understand how they work.
Studying mitosis' structure to understand the inside of cancer cells
Cell division is an intricately choreographed ballet of proteins and molecules that divide the cell.
Ras protein's role in spreading cancer
Protein systems make up the complex signaling pathways that control whether a cell divides or, in some cases, metastasizes.
Blood and urine tests developed to indicate autism in children
New tests which can indicate autism in children have been developed by researchers at the University of Warwick.
Nitrate in drinking water increases the risk of colorectal cancer
Nitrate in groundwater and drinking water, which primarily comes from fertilisers used in the agricultural production, has not only been subject to decades of environmental awareness -- it has also been suspected of increasing the risk of cancer.

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