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Science News | Science Current Events | Brightsurf | March 09, 2018


Researcher creates 'Instagram' of immune system, blending science, technology
Hollings Cancer Center researcher Carsten Krieg, Ph.D., who recently joined the faculty of the Medical University of South Carolina, uses a machine aptly labeled Helios to create a sort of 'Instagram' of a person's immune system.
Breakthrough in circuit design makes electronics more resistant to damage and defects
A paper in today's Nature Electronics details an innovation from researchers at the Advanced Science Research Center (ASRC) at The Graduate Center of The City University of New York that provides robust protection against circuitry damage that affects signal transmission.
Blood samples can soon reveal your lifestyle
People who use moist snuff 'snus' have significantly higher levels of the protein cornulin in their blood than non-snusers.
New method increases life span of donated brain tissue
Researchers at Lund University in Sweden have developed a method that enables them to use donated brain tissue from people with epilepsy for 48 hours.
Novel technology for anticancer drug delivery on demand
With the goal of minimizing the side effects of chemotherapy on healthy tissues, IBS scientists have developed novel nanocontainers able to deliver anticancer drugs at precise timing and location.
Sustainable embedded wireless systems reduce environmental impact of ICT
Renowned international scientists have presented first-level research results on the intersection of embedded systems and wireless networks at the EWSN 2018 conference.
Mandatory flu vaccines for health care workers improve rates, reduce absenteeism
Mandatory flu vaccines for health care workers improve participation by as much as 30 percent and reduce absenteeism during critical periods of patient surges by about 6 percent, findings from a multi-institutional study show.
New conductive coating may unlock biometric and wearable technology of the future
A team of researchers from the College of Engineering at Texas A&M University have developed a mechanically robust conductive coating that can maintain performance under heavy stretching and bending.
Are those who help the bad good or bad? The answer depends on adaptive architectures.
Are those who help the bad good or bad? Game theoreticians reveal that the answer depends on whether the society adopts 'individualism' or 'dividualism'.
Agricultural sustainability project reached 20.9 million smallholder farmers across China
An effort to improve crop yields and reduce fertilizer use applied top-down and bottom-up approaches to reach 20 million smallholder farmers across China.
Tokyo Tech's six-legged robots get closer to nature
A study led by researchers at Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) has uncovered new ways of driving multi-legged robots by means of a two-level controller.
When sciences come together
Kyoto University investigates how seemingly separate concepts in scientific fields fuse to become universal approaches by by developing a new methodology to analyze citations in papers that use similar concepts, and tracked the changes over time.
Academic study finds women wearing heavy makeup less likely to be perceived as leaders
Women wearing heavy makeup are less likely to be thought of as good leaders, new research from Abertay University has found.
Metal-organic compounds produces new class of glass
Lightning and volcanos both produce glass, and humans have been making glass from silicon dioxide since prehistory.
Modulation of Fgf21 gene in early-life ameliorates adulthood diet-induced obesity
The nutritional environment in early life can lead to epigenetic changes in the genome that influence the risk of obesity in later life.
Blood stored longer may be less safe for patients with massive blood loss and shock
In a collaborative study using a mouse model, researchers have found mechanistic links between older stored red blood cell transfusions and subsequent bacterial pneumonia.
Could living at high altitude increase suicide risk? Evidence suggests possible treatments, reports Harvard Review of Psychiatry
High-altitude areas -- particularly the US intermountain states -- have increased rates of suicide and depression, suggests a review of research evidence in the Harvard Review of Psychiatry.
Telemonitoring in cardiac disorders: Benefit still unclear
The data showed no relevant differences for some outcome criteria, and data were missing for others -- also because some studies remain incompletely published.
Trauma and dementia patients given hope by 'flashbulb memory' breakthrough
University of Sussex scientists have made a telling breakthrough in detailing the formation of 'flashbulb memories', which can help a snail find a sugary treat but also mean a war survivor repeatedly relives their trauma.
Heat shock system helps bug come back to life after drying up
The larva of the sleeping chironomid, Polypedilum vanderplanki -- a mosquito-like insect that inhabits semi-arid areas of Africa -- is well known for being able to come back to life after being nearly completely desiccated, losing up to 97 percent of its body's water content.
NASA's Webb Telescope to make a splash in search for interstellar water
Water is crucial for life, but how do you make water?
Spotlight on quantum computing at SXSW 2018
South by Southwest 2018 hosts a panel on March 10th called Quantum Computing: Science Fiction to Science Fact.
ZMapp antibody delivered by viral vector protects against Ebola infection
A new study comparing the effectiveness of individual ZMapp antibodies versus a cocktail of antibodies, administered to mice using recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) delivery vectors, showed the ability to achieve 100% protection against infection by Ebola virus.
Liver study offers insights into hard-to-treat diseases
A key cell process that could cause damage to bile ducts and help explain some liver diseases has been identified by scientists.
Most patients comfortable with sexual orientation and gender identity questions
New Mayo Clinic research suggests up to 97 percent of patients are comfortable with their health care provider asking sexual orientation and gender identity questions.
Plant-derived volatiles may serve as future antifungals
A research team at the VIB-KU Leuven Center for Microbiology has developed a novel screening method to identify antimicrobial properties of volatile substances.
Report identifies options for lowering risk of failure of undersea bolts on offshore oil rigs
A new report from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine identifies strategies for improving the reliability of bolts used in offshore oil and gas drilling rigs, thereby reducing the risk that a bolt failure could cause a spill of oil, drilling fluids, or natural gas into the environment.
Startup scales up CNT membranes to make carbon-zero fuels for less than fossil fuels
Mattershift, an NYC startup with alumni from MIT and Yale has achieved a breakthrough in making carbon nanotube (CNT) membranes at large scale.
NASA sees Tropical Cyclone Hola drenching Vanuatu, New Caledonia
Tropical Cyclone Hola was dropping heavy rainfall on Vanuatu and New Caledonia when the Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM core satellite passed overhead.
Emotional support is key for stroke patients, research suggests
Doctors caring for severe stroke patients need to take account of their psychological needs and help prepare families for the possibility that they may not recover, a study suggests.
New blood pressure app and hardware rivals arm cuff accuracy
A team of Michigan State University scientists has created a new app and hardware for smartphones to measure blood pressure with accuracy that may rival arm-cuff devices.
Locked in a forest
Argonne researchers have found that in the next 100 years, already existing reforestation in the country could help topsoil absorb an additional 2 billion tons of carbon.
2016 Brexit/Trump election results driven by fear and loathing
In 2016 voters in the US and the UK defied expert predictions with the Vote Leave campaign winning for the UK to leave the European Union (Brexit) and the election of President Donald Trump.
Meal times may be key to managing malaria, parasite study shows
Malaria infections might be brought under control by managing the meal times of infected people or animals, a study suggests.
Older adults with small social networks less likely to get cataract surgery
A new study by University of Michigan Kellogg Ey Center links familial relationships to the likelihood older adults will get needed cataract surgery -- a procedure with broad implications for health.
Burn specialists report a dramatic increase in burn injury survival over the past 30 years
For many years, people who sustained severe burn injuries often died.
Gut microbes influence severity of intestinal parasitic infections
A new study indicates that the kinds of microbes living in the gut influence the severity and recurrence of parasitic worm infections in developing countries.
A highly sensitive and multi-analytical system for hereditary kidney disease
Alport syndrome (AS) is a hereditary kidney disease caused by protein (collagen) abnormalities.
Dupilumab for neurodermatitis: Indication of an added benefit in adults
The first neurodermatitis drug undergoing the AMNOG procedure provides better symptom relief and has clear advantages particularly in the quality of life.
Blood donors' leftover immune cells reveal secrets of antibody affinity
Researchers at Iowa State University, partnering with the LifeServe Blood Center, have gained crucial insights into how natural killer cells circulating in the human body differ from those typically studied in the lab.
Eyelash-sized plants reveal climate change -- and citizen scientists help identify them
A motley band of citizen scientists -- including a high school student and a retired businesswoman -- teamed up with a botanist to build a tool that lets the public participate in a research project about eyelash-sized plants that reveal climate change.
An itch you can't scratch: Researchers find 'itch receptors' in the throats of mice
Working with mice, Johns Hopkins researchers report they have found previously known skin itch receptors in the airways that appear to contribute to bronchoconstriction and airway hypersensitivity, hallmarks of asthma and other respiratory disorders.
Can't sleep? Could be down to genetics
Researchers have identified specific genes that may trigger the development of sleep problems, and have also demonstrated a genetic link between insomnia and psychiatric disorders such as depression, or physical conditions such as type 2 diabetes.
NIH experts call for transformative research approach to end tuberculosis
A more intensive biomedical research approach is necessary to control and ultimately eliminate tuberculosis (TB), according to a perspective published in The American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.
Experiment sheds new light on prehistoric ocean conditions
An international research team modeled the prehistoric ocean to study the reduction of iron.
Mastering metastable matter
The phenomenon of metastability -- when a system is in a state that is stable but not the one of least energy -- is widely observed in nature and technology.
Three NASA satellites recreate solar eruption in 3-D
Scientists have developed a model that simulates how shocks following coronal mass ejections, or CMEs, propagate from the sun -- an effort made possible only by combining data from three different NASA satellites.
Evading in-flight lightning strikes
A new MIT study shows that electrically charging airplanes may reduce their risk of being struck by lightning.
Majority of mining-related injuries and illness in Illinois go unreported
Illnesses and injuries associated with working in Illinois mines are substantially underreported to the federal agency tasked with tracking these events, according to a new study published in the American Journal of Industrial Medicine.
West Coast waters returning to normal but salmon catches lagging
Ocean conditions off most of the US West Coast are returning roughly to average, after an extreme marine heat wave from about 2014 to 2016 disrupted the California Current Ecosystem and shifted many species beyond their traditional range, according to a new report from NOAA Fisheries' two marine laboratories on the West Coast.
A compass in the dark
A research team headed by scientists of Helmholtz Zentrum München and the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has published a new model in Nature Communications which allows studying magnetoreception.
A model for autoignition in turbulent jets
Jets are rapid streams of liquids or gases that forcefully shoot into a surrounding medium.
Antigen study supports new approach to vaccine for respiratory syncytial virus
Medical researchers have been trying to develop a vaccine for respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) for more than 50 years, without success.
Unique diamond impurities indicate water deep in Earth's mantle
UNLV scientists discovered the first direct evidence that fluid water pockets may exist as far as 500 miles deep into the Earth's mantle..
Study: Absence of key protein, TTP, rapidly turns young bones old
The absence of TTP, a protein critical to the control of inflammation, may lead to rapid and severe bone loss, according to a new study led by the University at Buffalo.
Defect in cells' antenna linked to deformed organs in zebrafish
A protein at the base of the 'antenna' of many of the body's cells is vital to a crucial type of cell signal and to whether organs like the heart develop correctly, a test with zebrafish shows.
ANU research reveals genetic timeline of early Pacific settlers
Researchers from The Australian National University have helped put together the most comprehensive study ever conducted into the origins of people in Vanuatu -- regarded as a geographic gateway from Asia to the Remote Pacific.
Increasing tree mortality in a warming world
A mix of factors is contributing to an increasing mortality rate of trees in the moist tropics, where trees in some areas are dying at about twice the rate that they were 35 years ago.
Newfound clock in blood brain barrier of fruit flies regulates daily permeability
Researchers found that the fruit fly blood brain barrier has a molecular clock that makes it more or less penetrable during over 24 hours.
Flat gallium joins roster of new 2-D materials
Scientists at Rice University and the Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore, have discovered a method to make atomically flat gallium that shows promise for nanoscale electronics.
Intravenous arginine benefits children after acute metabolic strokes
Children with mitochondrial diseases who suffered acute metabolic strokes benefited from rapid intravenous treatment with the amino acid arginine, experiencing no side effects from the treatment.

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