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Science Current Events and Science News | Brightsurf | March 16, 2018


Obesity and health problems: New research on a safeguard mechanism
Obesity and health problems: Researchers at Maisonneuve-Rosemont Hospital in Montreal shed light on a safeguard mechanism.
Researchers discover experimental obesity drug prevents development of kidney stones
Copenhagen: Scientists have found that a drug connected with fat regulation prevents the formation of kidney stones in mice.
Colorado cannabis workers are happy, but need better safety training
Colorado State University researchers have completed a first-of-its-kind, peer-reviewed study that examines the demographics, physical environment and psychosocial aspects of working in the cannabis trade, which is now legal in some form in over half the United States, including Colorado.
Two better than one: USU chemists advance sustainable battery technology
Utah State University chemists describe design and synthesis of a pi-conjugation-extended viologen molecule as a novel, two-electron storage anolyte for neutral total organic aqueous redox flow batteries.
Coral reefs suffering in Philippines despite outlawing damaging fishing practices
Some of the fishing methods used in today's small-scale fisheries are causing more damage to coral reefs than ever, a new UBC study has found.
Online intervention improves depression treatment rates in teen moms
An online program persuaded teenage mothers across 10 Kentucky counties to seek medical help for depression, highlighting an inexpensive way to increase mental health treatment rates for the vulnerable group, according to a University of Louisville study.
The absence of ants -- Entomologist confirms first Saharan farming 10,000 years ago
Dr Stefano Vanin was part of an international team working on discoveries at the Holocene age hunter-gatherer site at Takarkori in south-western Libya.
Your gender may affect how you perceive a woman's anxiety in STEM
Undergraduate students' reactions to reading about a woman's anxiety in a science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) class vary by gender according to a Dartmouth-led study published in the Psychology of Women Quarterly.
Tree care workers need better training to handle dangers on the job, Rutgers study finds
A Rutgers study calls attention to post-storm hazards posed to tree care workers and provides safety recommendations.
New solution to harmful algal blooms raises hope of economic and environmental benefits
A cheap, safe and effective method of dealing with harmful algal blooms is on the verge of being introduced following successful field and lab tests.
Researchers join forces to improve life for children with genetic disorder
The achievements of three girls who received intensive therapy through the Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute's Neuromotor Research Clinic based on innovative pediatric neurorehabilitation research have been documented in a report published in BMC Research Notes.
Fish the primary source of nutrition in medieval Northern Ostrobothnia
Researchers investigated the diet of people buried in the Ii Hamina, Northern Finland, cemetery from the 15th to the 17th centuries by analysing isotopes in the bones of the deceased.
Study casts doubt on ketamine nasal sprays for depression
Researchers from UNSW Sydney and the Black Dog Institute have questioned the efficacy and safety of intranasal ketamine for depression, with their pilot trial stopped early due to poor side effects in patients.
Long-term monitoring is essential to effective environmental policy
Environmental policy guided by science saves lives, money, and ecosystems.
Raising transparency in the online advertising ecosystem
The online advertising business, led by companies like Google or Facebook, generated over $200 billion revenue in 2017, with an interanual growth over 15 percent.
Development of an enzymatic cycling method using pyruvate kinase
Enzyme cycling is a sensitive assay method that exploits amplification techniques.
First accurate data showing male to female transgender surgery can give better life
Scientists have developed a transgender-specific questionnaire, which confirms for the first time that gender surgery significantly improves quality of life for the majority of patients.
Soil fungi may help determine the resilience of forests to environmental change
A major new study reveals that soil fungi could play a significant role in the ability of forests to adapt to environmental change.
Chemical peels are safe for people with darker skin, result in few side effects and complications
Results from a new study led by Boston Medical Center (BMC) indicate that, when performed appropriately, chemical peels can be a safe treatment option for people with darker skin.
Monocrystalline silicon thin film for cost-cutting solar cells with 10-times faster growth rate fabricated
A research team from Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) and Waseda University have successfully produced high-quality thin film monocrystalline silicon with a reduced crystal defect density down to the silicon wafer level at a growth rate that is more than 10 times higher than before.
3-D tissue model of developing heart could help drug safety testing for pregnant women
A Syracuse University engineering team has developed a process that combines biomaterials-based cell patterning and stem cell technology to make a 3-D tissue model that could mimic early stage human heart development.
Blood vessels also affected by Alzheimer's disease
A research conducted by the UAB demonstrates that mice suffering from this disease also have substantial malfunctions in small blood vessels, important in nourishing different organs and tissues and in regulating blood pressure, and which mainly affects females.
Assaults spiked on Trump rally days during 2016 election
Cities experienced 2.3 more assaults than average on days when hosting presidential campaign rallies for Donald Trump during the lead-up to the 2016 United States Presidential Election, according to a first of its kind study published today in Epidemiology by researchers in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania.
With new 'shuffling' trick, researchers can measure gene activity in single cells
Researchers at the University of Washington and the Allen Institute for Brain Science have developed a new method to classify and track the multitude of cells in a tissue sample.
Signaling pathways to the nucleus
Researchers have demonstrated how auxin, a hormone that controls many processes in plants, reaches its destination.
NASA satellite finds Tropical Cyclone Marcus near Australia's Cobourg Peninsula Coast
Tropical Cyclone Marcus has developed off the coast of Australia's Northern Territory along the Cobourg Peninsula coast.
Mobile application detecting atrial fibrillation reduces the risk of stroke
A new application developed at the University of Turku, Finland, can detect atrial fibrillation that causes strokes.
The role of verb fluency in the detection of early cognitive impairment in Alzheimer's disease
The ability to generate spoken verbs in infinitive in a given time begins to worsen in the early stages of Alzheimer's disease (AD).
Climate change promotes the spread of mosquito and tick-borne viruses
Scientists at the Joint Research Centre, the European Commission's science and knowledge service, find that global warming has allowed disease-bearing insects to proliferate, increasing exposure to viral infections.
Near-infrared photoactivatable oxygenation catalysts of amyloid peptide
A new, biocompatible photooxygenation catalyst that can selectively oxygenate and degrade the pathogenic aggregation of Alzheimer's disease (AD)-related amyloid-β peptide (Aβ) under near-infrared (NIR) light irradiation is developed.
80% cut in liver metastasis by restricting the blood vessels supplying it
The International Journal of Cancer has just published the results of an experimental therapy tested on mice.
Piezomagnetic material changes magnetic properties when stretched
Piezoelectric materials, which generate an electric current when compressed or stretched, are familiar and widely used: lighters that spark when you press a switch, microphones, sensors, motors and all kinds of other devices.
Not having a regular doctor affects healthcare quality for older adults
About five percent of older adults on Medicare don't have a 'personal physician,' and this group scores lower on measures of healthcare quality, reports a study in the April issue of Medical Care, published by Wolters Kluwer.
Wandering greenhouse gas
On the seafloor of the shallow coastal regions north of Siberia, microorganisms produce methane when they break down plant remains.
New report examines scientific evidence on safety and quality of abortion care in US
While legal abortions in the US are safe, the likelihood that women will receive the type of abortion services that best meet their needs varies considerably depending on where they live, says a new report from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine.
Experience trumps youth among jumping fish
Tiny jumping fish can leap further as they get older, new research shows.
Soot transported from elsewhere in world contributes little to melting of some Antarctic glaciers
Airborne soot produced by wildfires and fossil-fuel combustion and transported to the remote McMurdo Dry Valleys of Antarctica contains levels of black carbon too low to contribute significantly to the melting of local glaciers, according to a new study by researchers supported by the National Science Foundation (NSF).
Chirping is welcome in birds but not in fusion devices
Article describes cause of chirping that signals loss of heat from fusion reactions.
New understanding of Kenyan Paleoenvironments opens window on human evolution in the area
Interest in human evolution has stimulated new geological work in the southern rift valley of Kenya.
Plasmons triggered in nanotube quantum wells
A novel quantum effect observed in a carbon nanotube film could lead to the development of near-infrared lasers and other optoelectronic devices, according to scientists at Rice University and Tokyo Metropolitan University.
Which skills will help patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder?
Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is a complex psychological condition, and those who suffer from it experience severe reduction in their quality of life.
Sexual harassment statistics: Do the numbers reveal the true extent of the problem?
A new article addresses the statistics of sexual harassment and questions how prevalent it is.
Reefs help protect vulnerable Caribbean fish from climate change
New research from UBC's Institute for the Oceans and Fisheries suggests that larger reef areas may help protect the Caribbean's coral reef fish communities from the impacts of ocean warming.
GPM sees Tropical Cyclone Eliakim bring Madagascar soaking rainfall
As Tropical Cyclone Eliakim was strengthening on its way to landfall in Madagascar the Global Precipitation Measurement mission, or GPM, core satellite found very heavy rainfall occurring in the tropical storm.
Mice change their appearance as a result of frequent exposure to humans
Many tame domesticated animals have a different appearance compared to their relatives in the wild, for example white patches in their fur or shorter snouts.
Unexpected effect could lead to lower-power memory, computing devices
An expected effect, known as zero field switching, could enable lower-power memory and computing devices than presently possible.
Scientists mimic neural tissue in Army-funded research
US Army-funded researchers at Brandeis University have discovered a process for engineering next-generation soft materials with embedded chemical networks that mimic the behavior of neural tissue.
Bees: How royal jelly prevents royal offspring from falling out of their cells
Defying gravity: A special mixture of proteins in the larval food of bees ensures that future queen larvae survive.
Researchers advise the use of anaesthesia in foetuses from 21 weeks of gestation
From the second trimester of pregnancy, the future baby already shows signs of pain when given a harmful stimulus or as a response to stress.
BU: Brazil yellow fever outbreak necessitates vaccines
Brazil is in the midst of a yellow fever outbreak, with the mosquito-borne virus reaching popular tourist destinations that do not normally see the disease.
Smart software can diagnose prostate cancer as well as a pathologist
Chinese scientists and clinicians have developed a learning artificial intelligence system which can diagnose and identify cancerous prostate samples as accurately as any pathologist.
Human 'chimeric' cells restore crucial protein in Duchenne muscular dystrophy
Cells made by fusing a normal human muscle cell with a muscle cell from a person with Duchenne muscular dystrophy -- a rare but fatal form of muscular dystrophy -- were able to significantly improve muscle function when implanted into the muscles of a mouse model of the disease.
Americans slow down the clock of age
A close examination of national health data indicate that the rate of biological aging appears to be more delayed for all Americans, but particularly for men, which may extend their lives.
Elusive venomous mammal joins the genome club
An article published in GigaScience presents a draft genome of a small shrew-like animal, the venomous Hispaniolan solenodon.
Older adults' difficulties with focusing can be used to help put a face to a name
Everyone has experienced the awkward situation of meeting someone and then forgetting their name shortly after.
Genetic variant discovery to help asthma sufferers
Research from the University of Liverpool, published in Lancet Respiratory Medicine, identifies a genetic variant that could improve the safety and effectiveness of corticosteroids, drugs that are used to treat a range of common and rare conditions including asthma, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).
UCalgary researchers develop portable brain imaging system to shed light on concussions
It's one of the most talked about injuries in sport today, concussion.

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