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Science News | Science Current Events | Brightsurf | March 18, 2018


Decline in colorectal cancer deaths in Europe is a 'major success' story
The decline in cancer of the intestines -- colorectal cancer -- is one of the major success stories of the past 30 years in Europe say researchers, as they predict that in 2018 death rates from the disease will continue to fall by around 7 percent compared to 2012.
Living sensor can potentially prevent environmental disasters from fuel spills
By the time a Colonial Pipeline leak was detected last fall during a routine inspection, vapors from the quarter-million gallons of released gasoline were so strong they prevented pipeline repair for days.
Mediterranean diet is linked to higher muscle mass, bone density after menopause
The heart-healthy Mediterranean diet also appears to be good for an older woman's bones and muscles, a new study of postmenopausal women in Brazil finds.
Breastfeeding may protect high-birthweight infants from childhood obesity
Breastfeeding may protect high-birthweight infants from having overweight or obesity as children, new research from South Korea suggests.
Stem cell therapy may help reverse effects of premature menopause, restore fertility
Young women with premature ovarian insufficiency (POI) may be able to use their own bone marrow stem cells to rejuvenate their ovaries and avoid the effects of premature menopause, new research suggests.
Race, pre-pregnancy BMI may help predict maternal weight gain
Race and pre-pregnancy body mass index (BMI) both affect leptin and adiponectin levels, and leptin levels in mid-pregnancy may be an important predictor of weight gain during pregnancy, new research suggests.
In BRCA mutation carriers, obesity is linked with increased DNA damage
Being obese or having a higher body mass index (BMI) while carrying a BRCA (BReast CAncer gene) mutation is positively linked with higher levels of damage to the DNA in normal breast gland cells, new research suggests.
New diabetes drug may help people with obesity lose weight
A compound that mimics a naturally occurring hormone that regulates appetite may help people who have obesity but not diabetes to lose weight, a new study suggests.
Volcanic eruption influenced Iceland's conversion to Christianity
Memories of the largest lava flood in the history of Iceland, recorded in an apocalyptic medieval poem, were used to drive the island's conversion to Christianity, new research suggests.
Dimethandrolone undecanoate shows promise as a male birth control pill
A new birth control pill for men appears to be safe when used daily for a month, with hormone responses consistent with effective contraception, study researchers say.
E-cigarettes may lead to accumulation of fat in the liver
Using e-cigarettes may lead to an accumulation of fat in the liver, a study of mice exposed to the devices suggests.
Interactive virtual reality enhances physicians' treatment planning of complex conditions
Interactive virtual reality (VR) brings medical images to life on screen, showing interventional radiologists a patient's unique internal anatomy to help physicians effectively prepare and tailor their approach to complex treatments, such as splenic artery aneurysm repair, according to new research being presented today at the Society of Interventional Radiology's 2018 Annual Scientific Meeting.
Consuming low-calorie sweeteners may predispose overweight individuals to diabetes
Consumption of low-calorie sweeteners could promote metabolic syndrome and predispose people to prediabetes and diabetes, particularly in individuals with obesity, a new study on human fat-derived stem cells and fat samples suggests.
Better understanding ALS by looking at how cells change
Eight years in the making, a discovery by neuroscientists in Montreal highlights the value of long-term, fundamental research and provides important information for future drug targets.
The Swiss army knife of smoke screens
The military uses smoke grenades to provide cover for people and tanks on the move.
Low sperm count not just a problem for fertility
A man's semen count is a marker of his general health, according to the largest study to date evaluating semen quality, reproductive function and metabolic risk in men referred for fertility evaluation.
High-energy breakfast promotes weight loss
In patients with obesity and type 2 diabetes, a meal schedule that includes a high-energy breakfast promotes weight loss, improves diabetes and decreases the need for insulin, new research from Israel reports.
Feinstein Institute discovery promises improved diagnosis and understanding of endometriosis
Feinstein Institute for Medical Research scientists announced an experimental, rapid and non-invasive way to diagnose endometriosis, which may lead to earlier and more effective treatments for this disorder that affects approximately 176 million women globally.
Hormone imbalance may explain higher diabetes rates in sleep-deprived men
Studies have found an association between insufficient sleep and the development of insulin resistance, one of the factors that cause type 2 diabetes, and now researchers have discovered a biological reason for this relationship, at least in men: an imbalance between their testosterone and cortisol hormones.
Overeating during breastfeeding may affect the health of offspring
Mothers who overeat during the period when they are breastfeeding may have children who are at increased risk of becoming obese and going through early puberty, a new study of mice suggests.
Columbia scientists locate nerve cells that enable fruit flies to escape danger
Researchers have identified the nerve cells that initiate a fly's escape response: that complex series of movements in which an animal senses, and quickly maneuvers away from, something harmful such as high heat.

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