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Science News | Science Current Events | Brightsurf | March 30, 2018


Linking teen driving behaviors to ADHD, other mental health factors
Teen drivers are three times more likely to get into a fatal crash than their more-experienced, older counterparts.
Using chosen names reduces odds of depression and suicide in transgender youths
In one of the largest and most diverse studies of transgender youths to date, researchers led by a team at the University of Texas at Austin have found that when transgender youths are allowed to use their chosen name in places such as work, school and at home, their risk of depression and suicide drops.
A novel test bed for non-equilibrium many-body physics
The behavior of electrons in a material is typically difficult to predict.
Study finds children with autism and ADHD at higher rise for anxiety
Children with both autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are at increased risk for being diagnosed with or treated for anxiety and mood disorders, according to a study published in Pediatrics today.
Stanford researchers probe the complex nature of concussion
Concussion is a major public health problem, but not much is known about the impacts that cause concussion or how to prevent them.
Calculating the impacts of natural events on wildlife
A new method could help scientists understand how wildlife populations are affected by major natural events, such as hurricanes, severe winters, and tsunamis.
Federal officials urged to increase perinatal depression treatment in minority women
Despite increased risks of perinatal depression, research has shown that Latina and African-American women are significantly less likely to be screened or treated.
Can a Mediterranean diet pattern slow aging?
A series of six articles appearing in the March issue of The Journals of Gerontology, Series A: Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences finds new correlations between a Mediterranean diet and healthy aging outcomes -- while also underscoring the need for careful approaches to the use of data in order to measure the diet's potential benefits.
Internet addiction in teenagers studied at Kazan University
The authors found out that the majority of those questioned have predispositions for Internet addiction.
Rational protein engineering can improve effectiveness of mRNA therapies
mRNA drugs offer a promising new approach to deliver therapeutic replacement proteins, and novel strategies designed to engineer more stable and active proteins are further enhancing the potential of mRNA therapies.
Declines in lung cancer death rates among US women have lagged in 2 hot spots
While lung cancer death rates among women in most of the United States have declined substantially in recent years, progress among women in a region covering central Appalachia and southern parts of the Midwest and in northern parts of the Midwest has lagged.
Researchers find ways to impede progress of neurodegenerative diseases
As the paper posits, there is currently no doubt that hyperpolarization of mitochondria and concomitant oxidative stress are associated with the development of serious pathologies, such as Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, autoimmune syndromes, some cancers, and other conditions.
Cracking eggshell nanostructure
How is it that fertilized chicken eggs manage to resist fracture from the outside, while at the same time, are weak enough to break from the inside during chick hatching?
Adult-onset neurodegeneration has roots in early development
The roots of a progressive degenerative disease begin much earlier than previously thought, according to a recent Northwestern Medicine study.
New study finds world's largest desert, the Sahara, has grown by 10 percent since 1920
The Sahara Desert has expanded by about 10 percent since 1920, according to a new study by National Science Foundation (NSF)-funded scientists at the University of Maryland (UMD).
Microengineered slippery rough surface for water harvesting from air
A slippery rough surface (SRS) inspired by both pitcher plants and rice leaves outperforms state-of-the-art liquid-repellent surfaces in water harvesting applications, according to a team of researchers at Penn State and the University of Texas at Dallas.
A synthetic chameleon has been developed
An international team of researchers including Dmitry Ivanov, the head of laboratory of functional soft-matter systems, MSU, announced the development of a synthetic chameleon skin.
Strings of electron-carrying proteins may hold the secret to 'electric bacteria'
Could a unique bacterium be nature's microscopic power plant? USC scientists who work with a species of bacteria that essentially 'breathe' rocks think it's possible.
Optimistic Latinos have healthier hearts, study finds
Latinos who are the most optimistic are more likely to have healthy hearts, suggests a new study of more than 4,900 Latinos led by, Rosalba Hernandez.
Gut microbes could help better predict risk of hospitalization for patients with cirrhosis
The gut microbiome -- a collection of bacteria and other microbes in the gut -- could be a highly accurate predictor of hospitalizations for patients with cirrhosis, according to a recently published study led by a researcher at Virginia Commonwealth University.
Butterflies of the soul
A new study reveals how interneurons, dubbed 'the butterflies of the soul,' emerge and diversify in the brain.
Is there life adrift in the clouds of Venus?
In the search for extraterrestrial life, scientists have turned over all sorts of rocks.
Computer searches telescope data for evidence of distant planets
MIT researchers have used physics principles to improve the performance of a machine-learning system, trained on data from a NASA crowdsourcing project, that searches astronomical data for evidence of debris disks around stars, which can indicate the presence of an exoplanet.
Basking sharks gather in large groups off northeast US coast
Groups of basking sharks ranging from as few as 30 to nearly 1,400 individual animals have been observed aggregating in waters from Nova Scotia to Long Island.
Engineers turn plastic insulator into heat conductor
Is your laptop or phone overheating? New MIT-engineered plastic could lead to self-cooling casings for common electronics.
Cat-like 'hearing' with device tens of trillions times smaller than human eardrum
Researchers at Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland, Ohio, are developing atomically thin 'drumheads'-- tens of trillions of times thinner than the human eardrum -- able to receive and transmit signals across a radio frequency range far greater than what we can hear with the human ear.
Proposed border wall will harm Texas plants and animals, scientists say
In the latest peer-reviewed publication on the potential impacts of a border wall on plants and animals, conservation biologists, led by a pair of scientists from the University of Texas at Austin, say that border walls threaten to harm endangered Texas plants and animals and cause trouble for the region's growing ecotourism industry.
NASA satellite gets an eye-opening look at Super Typhoon Jelawat
Satellite imagery showed that Tropical Cyclone Jelawat had developed an eye as it strengthened into a Super Typhoon.
Bioinspired slick method improves water harvesting
By learning how water is collected by living organisms, including rice leaves and pitcher plants, scientists at The University of Texas at Dallas created and tested a combination of materials that can do the same thing, but faster.
Monash discovery uncovers clue to disarm gonorrhea superbug
Monash University researchers have discovered a way the gonorrhea bacteria cleverly evade the immune system -- opening up the way for therapies that prevent this process, allowing the body's natural defenses to kill the bug.
Study: To prevent collapse of tropical forests, protect their shape
Scientists have made a fundamental discovery about how fires on the edges of tropical forests control their shape and stability.
Did highest known sea levels create the iconic shape of Mount Etna?
New research by Professor Iain Stewart from the University of Plymouth suggests the Mediterranean Sea may have played a major role in the development of its iconic shape tens of thousands of years ago.

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