Nav: Home

Science Current Events and Science News | Brightsurf | June 10, 2018


Bacteriophages: Are they an overlooked driver of Parkinson's disease?
In the first study of its kind, researchers from the New York-based Human Microbiology Institute have discovered the role certain bacteriophages may play in the onset of Parkinson's disease (PD).
Development of vaccines from AIDS to Zika, using a novel 'plug and play' viral platform
Researchers from GeoVax have developed a flexible 'Plug and Play' technology platform that delivers single-dose vaccines that fully protect against emerging infectious diseases such as Zika, Lassa fever, and Ebola.
New research reveals benefits of a vegetarian diet
Eating a vegetarian or primarily plant-based diet is associated with a variety of health benefits.
Slow motion playback makes football referees harsher
Football referees penalize situations more severely when watching them in slow motion compared to real time, according to a study published in the open-access journal of the Psychonomic Society, Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications.
Scientists identify foods that fight disease
Nutrition 2018 will feature the latest research into how adding certain foods to our diet might help lower risk for diabetes, cancer, neurodegenerative diseases and other health issues.
American toddlers consume too much added sugar
A new study suggests children in the US begin consuming added sugar at a very young age and that many toddlers' sugar intake exceeds the maximum amount recommended for adults.
Enzyme found to control formation of collagen carriers and inhibit collagen secretion
Researchers at Tokyo Tech have identified an enzyme that controls how much our cells secrete collagen.
30% of the UK's natural gas could be replaced by hydrogen, cutting carbon emissions
Almost a third of the natural gas fuelling UK homes and businesses could be replaced by hydrogen, a carbon free fuel, without requiring any changes to the nation's boilers and ovens, a pioneering study by Swansea University researchers has shown.
Drug resistance genes shared among bacteria in hospitals can be deadly
A hospital outbreak of carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE) became more worrisome when researchers found resistance genes being shared among unrelated bacteria via plasmids and other mobile genetic elements.
Negative rapid test results may delay antiviral therapy in patients with severe influenza
A new study has found that half of influenza cases in patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) received a false negative rapid influenza antigen test (RIAT).
Moderate and extreme temperatures could increase the risk of occupational injuries
Cold and heat increase the risk of occupational injury in Spain by 4 percent and 9 percent, respectively.
Improving Americans' diets could save billions in health-related costs
New research suggests improving the quality of the average American's diet could substantially reduce costs associated with heart disease, diabetes, cancer and other major health problems.
Treg cells protect babies from getting HIV infection from their mothers
Scientists now report that Treg cells, a type of regulatory lymphocyte, may be protecting babies in the womb from getting infected with the HIV virus when the mother is infected.
D-Transposition of the great arteries: a new era in cardiology
In the current issue of Cardiovascular Innovations and Applications (Volume 3, Number 1, 2018, pp. pp.
Atrial arrhythmias including atrial fibrillation in congenital heart disease: Mechanisms, substrate identification and interventional approaches
In the current issue of Cardiovascular Innovations and Applications (Volume 3, Number 1, 2018, pp. pp.
Otago researchers help unlock answers about leptospirosis in Africa
University of Otago researchers are helping lead international studies which have discovered that exposure to cattle and rice farming are risk factors for the devastating disease leptospirosis in northern Tanzania.
Heart transplantation for adult CHD: Overview and special considerations
In the current issue of Cardiovascular Innovations and Applications (Volume 3, Number 1, 2018, pp. pp.
Bacteriophages offer promising alternative to antibiotics
Results from a new clinical study have confirmed the safety and tolerability of using bacteria-specific viruses known as bacteriophages to eliminate disease-causing bacteria in the gut.
The Fontan circulation
In the current issue of Cardiovascular Innovations and Applications (Volume3, Number 1, 2018, pp. pp.
His bundle pacing: rebirth of an important technique for pacing the intrinsic conduction system
In the current issue of Cardiovascular Innovations and Applications (Volume 3, Number 1, 2018, pp. pp.
Pulmonary arterial hypertension medical management of the adult patient with CHD
In the current issue of Cardiovascular Innovations and Applications (Volume3, Number 1, 2018, pp. pp.
Left ventricular systolic function after pulmonary valve replacement
In the current issue of Cardiovascular Innovations and Applications (Volume 3, Number 1, 2018, pp. pp.
Breaking laws, making glass
IBS researchers have designed an innovative method to study how interacting particles behave at temperatures close to absolute zero, and found a situation where the laws of thermodynamics and statistical mechanics are not respected, energy is not evenly distributed, and equilibrium is not reached.
The surgical management of Ebstein anomaly
In the current issue of Cardiovascular Innovations and Applications (Volume3, Number 1, 2018, pp. pp.
The adult ventricular septum; a unique portion of the left and right ventricle
In the current issue of Cardiovascular Innovations and Applications (Volume 3, Number 1, 2018, pp. pp.

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Moving Forward
When the life you've built slips out of your grasp, you're often told it's best to move on. But is that true? Instead of forgetting the past, TED speakers describe how we can move forward with it. Guests include writers Nora McInerny and Suleika Jaouad, and human rights advocate Lindy Lou Isonhood.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#527 Honey I CRISPR'd the Kids
This week we're coming to you from Awesome Con in Washington, D.C. There, host Bethany Brookshire led a panel of three amazing guests to talk about the promise and perils of CRISPR, and what happens now that CRISPR babies have (maybe?) been born. Featuring science writer Tina Saey, molecular biologist Anne Simon, and bioethicist Alan Regenberg. A Nobel Prize winner argues banning CRISPR babies won’t work Geneticists push for a 5-year global ban on gene-edited babies A CRISPR spin-off causes unintended typos in DNA News of the first gene-edited babies ignited a firestorm The researcher who created CRISPR twins defends...