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Science Current Events and Science News | Brightsurf | June 17, 2018


Diabetes diagnosis may signal early pancreatic cancer in older African-Americans, Latinos
A new study from the Keck School of Medicine of USC shows that African-Americans and Latinos who are diagnosed with diabetes after age 50 have a more than threefold risk of developing pancreatic cancer.
New technique provides accurate dating of ancient skeletons
A new way of dating skeletons by using mutations in DNA associated with geography will avoid the difficulties and inaccuracies sometimes associated with existing dating methods.
Gut microbes may contribute to depression and anxiety in obesity
Like everyone, people with type 2 diabetes and obesity suffer from depression and anxiety, but even more so.
Life in the fast lane: USU ecologist says dispersal ability linked to plants' life cycles
Utah State University ecologist Noelle Beckman says seed dispersal is an essential, yet overlooked, process of plant demography, but it's difficult to empirically observe, measure and assess its full influence.
Genomic testing for the causes of stillbirth should be considered for routine use
The use of whole genome and whole exome sequencing can uncover the cause of unexplained stillbirth and neonatal deaths.

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