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Science Current Events and Science News | Brightsurf | July 08, 2018


Following pitch count guidelines may help young baseball players prevent injuries
Young pitchers who exceed pitch count limits are more prone to elbow injuries, according to research presented today at the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine's Annual Meeting in San Diego.
Cross species transfer of genes has driven evolution
Far from just being the product of our parents, University of Adelaide scientists have shown that widespread transfer of genes between species has radically changed the genomes of today's mammals, and been an important driver of evolution.
Surgery offers young patients long-term benefits after meniscus tears
Young patients who underwent surgery for isolated meniscus tears between 1990 and 2005 showed positive long-term clinical results, according to new research presented today at the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine's Annual Meeting in San Diego.
Simple test to predict rare cancers' likely spread
Circulating tumor cell clusters in the blood of head and neck patients with locally and regionally advanced cancer have been found to be strongly associated with distant metastases within six months.

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#537 Science Journalism, Hold the Hype
Everyone's seen a piece of science getting over-exaggerated in the media. Most people would be quick to blame journalists and big media for getting in wrong. In many cases, you'd be right. But there's other sources of hype in science journalism. and one of them can be found in the humble, and little-known press release. We're talking with Chris Chambers about doing science about science journalism, and where the hype creeps in. Related links: The association between exaggeration in health related science news and academic press releases: retrospective observational study Claims of causality in health news: a randomised trial This...