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Science Current Events and Science News | Brightsurf | July 13, 2018


Yale researchers identify target for novel malaria vaccine
A Yale-led team of researchers have created a vaccine that protects against malaria infection in mouse models, paving the way for the development of a human vaccine that works by targeting the specific protein that parasites use to evade the immune system.
Study examines prenatal depression in 2 generations of pregnant mothers
A study of two generations of women in England examined how common depression during pregnancy (prenatal depression) is in young mothers now compared with their mothers' generation.
Routine, coordinated treatment of opioid abuse can stem national epidemic
To help stem the nationwide opioid epidemic and related increases in HIV, hepatitis C and other infections, health care providers should routinely screen and treat patients for opioid abuse when they come to clinics and hospitals seeking other services.
The love lives of fruit flies
New study reveals that a male fruit fly's decision to court or ignore a female stems from the convergence of motivation, perception and chance.
Mice study implicates fat as obesity cause
Scientists at the Institute of Genetics and Developmental Biology found that only eating high levels of dietary fat makes you fat.
Residential segregation associated with black-white disparity in firearm homicide rates
Residential segregation is linked to many racial disparities in health, including cancer, high blood pressure, and diabetes.
Researchers trace Parkinson's damage in the heart
A new way to examine stress and inflammation in the heart will help Parkinson's researchers test new therapies and explore an unappreciated way the disease puts people at risk of falls and hospitalization.
Study finds 84 highly endangered Amur leopards remain in China and Russia
Scientists estimate there are only 84 remaining highly endangered Amur leopards (Panthera pardus orientalis) remaining in the wild across its current range along the southernmost border of Primorskii Province in Russia and Jilin Province of China.
Native state is fortunate trap in the journey of protein to its destination, fibril state
Arranging into well-organized fibrillar aggregate, commonly known as amyloid fibril is an inherent property of any polypeptide chain.
Theorists publish highest-precision prediction of muon magnetic anomaly
Latest calculation based on how subatomic muons interact with all known particles comes out just in time for comparison with precision measurements at new 'Muon g-2' experiment.
The secret sulfate code that lets the bad Tau in
Researchers at the UT Southwestern Medical Center have uncovered details of how cells invite inside corrupted proteins that can turn normal proteins corrupt, leading to neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases.
PTSD rate among prison employees equals that of war veterans
Prison employees experience PTSD on par with Iraq and Afghanistan war veterans, a new study from a Washington State University College of Nursing researcher found.
Fragile X: New drug strategy corrects behavior/biochemical measures in mouse model
Research in mice shows that a pharmacological strategy can alleviate multiple behavioral and cellular deficiencies in a mouse model of fragile X syndrome, the most common inherited form of intellectual disability.
Study finds deep subterranean connection between two Japan volcanoes
Scientists have confirmed for the first time that radical changes of one volcano in southern Japan was the direct result of an erupting volcano 22 kilometers (13.7 miles) away.
How looking at the big picture can lead to better decisions
New research suggests how distancing yourself from a decision may help you make the choice that produces the most benefit for you and others affected.
Allergy potential of strawberries and tomatoes depends on the variety
Strawberries and tomatoes are among the most widely consumed fruits and vegetables worldwide.
Expert panel compares opioid epidemic to early days of HIV epidemic
Experts are drawing on lessons learned from the early days of the HIV epidemic to address the current opioid epidemic.
By sending tests in the mail, researchers boost colorectal cancer screening
UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center researchers report that mailing colorectal cancer screening tests to patients insured by Medicaid increased screening rates for this population.
Nano-kirigami: 'Paper-cut' provides model for 3D intelligent nanofabrication
Dr. LI Jiafang, from the Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, has recently formed an international team to apply kirigami techniques to advanced 3D nanofabrication.
Sticking with the wrong choice
New research from the University of Minnesota published in the journal Science discovered that mice, rats, and humans all commit the sunk cost fallacy.
Products of omega-3 fatty acid metabolism may have anticancer effects, study shows
A class of molecules formed when the body metabolizes omega-3 fatty acids could inhibit cancer's growth and spread, University of Illinois researchers report in a new study in mice.
New research calculates capacity of North American forests to sequester carbon
Researchers have calculated the capacity of North American forests to sequester carbon in a detailed analysis that for the first time integrates natural processes and climate changes that are likely to alter growth over the next 60 years.
Deaths from cardiovascular disease rising in India, study finds
Death due to cardiovascular disease is on the rise in India, causing more than one quarter of all deaths in the country in 2015 and affecting rural populations and young adults the most, suggests a new study.
An MSU-based researcher developed an algorithm to improve information security tools
A scientist from MSU developed an algorithm increasing the speed of calculation of cryptographic transformations based on elliptical curves that requires little computational power.
Researchers discover natural product that could lead to new class of commercial herbicide
A team of UCLA engineers and scientists discovered a new and potentially highly effective type of weed killer.
Testosterone research brings new hope for cancer patients
Approximately 20 percent of cancer related deaths are attributed to the syndrome of cachexia.
UMBC researchers develop nanoparticles to reduce internal bleeding caused by blast trauma
Currently, there are no treatments available to address internal bleeding in the field but early intervention is key or survival and better outcomes.
New study reveals Ulsan is exposed to yearlong toxic fine dust
A new study, affiliated with South Korea's Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST) offers decisive proof that South Korea's Ulsan city is affected by toxic substances contained in fine dust particles, regardless of the season.
Study describes enzyme's key role in immune response to Chagas disease parasite
A study shows that the expression of PI3Kγ protein increases during infection by T. cruzi, an essential response in avoiding excessive inflammation and controlling parasitemia.
Reducing Australia's cancer death rate
New research has revealed for the first time what impact cutting back on drinking and smoking as a population would have on Australia's cancer death rate.
Looking at the urine and blood may be best in diagnosing myeloma
When it comes to diagnosing a condition in which the plasma cells that normally make antibodies to protect us instead become cancerous, it may be better to look at the urine as well as the serum of our blood for answers, pathologists say.
Synapse-specific plasticity governs the identity of overlapping memory traces
Each memory is stored in a specific population of neurons called engram cells.
NASA finds fragmented remnants of Beryl, located west of Bermuda
The remnants of former Tropical Storm Beryl are being battered by upper level winds, and that's fragmenting them even more.
Tuning into quantum: Scientists unlock signal frequency control of precision atom qubits
Australian scientists have achieved a new milestone in their approach to creating a quantum computer chip in silicon, demonstrating the ability to tune the control frequency of a qubit by engineering its atomic configuration.
Is surgery the best option for penetrating kidney trauma?
SLU surgeon Sameer A. Siddiqui, M.D., and his research team examined patient records to study the best approach for renal trauma injuries.
Study: Journalists view co-workers as more ethical than peers
The University of Texas at Dallas' Dr. Angela Lee explored journalists' opinions about one another -- both their co-workers and their peers.
Tree shrew tolerance for spicy foods unlocked by researchers
Researchers accidentally observed tree shrews directly and actively consuming chili peppers, despite the deep geographic isolation between the animal and the food.
Breast cancer follow-up imaging varies widely, study finds
Follow-up imaging for women with non-metastatic breast cancer varies widely across the country, according to a new study led by researchers at UC San Francisco.
Better methods improve measurements of recreational water quality
The concentration of enterococci, bacteria that thrive in feces, has long been the federal standard for determining water quality.
National Academies target opioid abuse and infectious disease consequences
The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine today released proceedings of a March 12 workshop exploring the rise in infectious diseases accompanying opioid abuse, and possible strategies for reducing both epidemics.
Growing a dinosaur's dinner
Scientists have measured the nutritional value of herbivore dinosaurs' diet by growing their food in atmospheric conditions similar to those found roughly 150 million years ago.
Reading rivers
In a new study, Harvard researchers say they may be able to estimate how glaciers moved by examining how the weight of the ice sheet altered topography and led to changes in the course of the river.
How fast can acute stroke treatment become to still be reliable?
Neurologists around the world are aware that the delivery of thrombolytic treatment for stroke in Helsinki University Hospital, Finland, is freaking fast -- but is it too fast?
Barium ruthenate: A high-yield, easy-to-handle perovskite catalyst for the oxidation of sulfides
Researchers at Tokyo Institute of Technology have developed a ruthenium-based perovskite catalyst that shows strong activity even at low temperatures (down to 313 K).
Nosocomial neonatal meningitis with Acinetobacter baumannii on myelomeningocele
In this article, together with a review of the literature, we report two cases of imipenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii neonatal meningitis following ruptured myelomeningocele, treated with intravenous colistin with favorable results.
Mangroves to mudflats and not back again
The long-term conversion of mangroves to mudflats can lead to destabilization of shorelines, negatively impacting their resilience to extreme weather events.
Community colleges can boost access to primary care and physician diversity
Medical school graduates who attended community college are more likely to select family medicine for their residency training and to be from groups traditionally underrepresented in medicine, new UC Davis Health research shows.
Protecting ribosome genes to prevent aging
Aging is a process of gradual deterioration from exposure to time and the elements; this process begins with deterioration deep inside every cell.

Best Science Podcasts 2018

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2018. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
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The Story Behind The Numbers
Is life today better than ever before? Does the data bear that out? This hour, TED speakers explore the stories we tell with numbers — and whether those stories portray the full picture. Guests include psychologist Steven Pinker, economists Tyler Cowen and Michael Green, journalist Hanna Rosin, and environmental activist Paul Gilding.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#487 Knitting in PEARL
This week we're discussing math and things made from yarn. We welcome mathematician Daina Taimina to the show to discuss her book "Crocheting Adventures with Hyperbolic Planes: Tactile Mathematics, Art and Craft for all to Explore", and how making geometric models that people can play with helps teach math. And we speak with research scientist Janelle Shane about her hobby of training neural networks to do things like name colours, come up with Halloween costume ideas, and generate knitting patterns: often with hilarious results. Related links: Crocheting the Hyperbolic Plane by Daina Taimina and David Henderson Daina's Hyperbolic Crochet blog...