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Science Current Events and Science News | Brightsurf | July 22, 2018


First dementia prevalence data in lesbian, gay and bisexual older adults
The first dementia prevalence data from a large population of lesbian, gay and bisexual older adults was reported today at the 2018 Alzheimer's Association International Conference in Chicago.
Exercise cuts risk of chronic disease in older adults
People who engaged in the highest levels of total physical activity were twice as lively to avoid stroke, heart disease, angina, cancer and diabetes, and be in optimal physical and mental shape 10 years later, experts found.
First practice guidelines for clinical evaluation of Alzheimer's disease
Despite more than two decades of advances in diagnostic criteria and technology, symptoms of Alzheimer's disease and Related Dementias (ADRD) too often go unrecognized or are misattributed, causing delays in appropriate diagnoses and care that are both harmful and costly.
Women under-treated for heart attacks die at twice the rate of men
Cardiac specialists say they are alarmed by new research findings led by the University of Sydney showing that women admitted to 41 Australian hospitals with serious heart attacks were half as likely as men to receive appropriate diagnostic tests and treatment, and less likely to be referred for cardiac rehabilitation and prescribed preventive medications at discharge.
Are star players over-rated in MLB? A key statistic doesn't stand up to scrutiny
Assessing play quality In baseball is complicated. ''Wins above replacement player'' (WARP) aggregate a player's total contribution to their team--offense and defense and primary position--into one easily understood statistics.
Red Sea flushes faster from far flung volcanoes
Volcanic eruptions in Mexico and the Philippines can lead to atmospheric changes that favor the ventilation of deep water in the Red Sea.
Saliva test could improve diabetes control and treatment
A simple saliva sample could replace blood tests to assess and monitor diabetes, finds a new study.
Statistics informs market: Sales stability spurs long-run success, not just sales
Acquiring customers is a fundamental goal of any start-up company, but those raw numbers can be a misleading metric for assessing the value of that company.
Why did home runs surge in baseball? Statistics provides twist on hot topic
Around the middle of the 2015 season, something odd started happening in Major League Baseball (MLB): Home runs surged.
The great NFL practice conundrum: How much should you train to avoid injury?
Researchers from Emory's Rollins School of Public Health studied whether there were any sudden changes in injuries after the NSF implemented practice restrictions in 2011, while adjusting for the fact that more attention has been paid to NFL injuries over time, which means the number of reported injuries had been going up even before the new CBA.
The short, tumultuous working life of a major league baseball pitcher
There are pitchers in Major League Baseball (MLB) who have had 30-year careers, but as UC Riverside demographer David Swanson points out, these are extreme outliers and often the stars of the game who receive most of the media's attention.

Best Science Podcasts 2019

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Approaching With Kindness
We often forget to say the words "thank you." But can those two words change how you — and those around you — look at the world? This hour, TED speakers on the power of gratitude and appreciation. Guests include author AJ Jacobs, author and former baseball player Mike Robbins, Dr. Laura Trice, Professor of Management Christine Porath, and former Danish politician Özlem Cekic.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#509 Anisogamy: The Beginning of Male and Female
This week we discuss how the sperm and egg came to be, and how a difference of reproductive interest has led to sexual conflict in bed bugs. We'll be speaking with Dr. Geoff Parker, an evolutionary biologist credited with developing a theory to explain the evolution of two sexes, about anisogamy, sexual reproduction through the fusion of two different gametes: the egg and the sperm. Then we'll speak with Dr. Roberto Pereira, research scientist in urban entomology at the University of Florida, about traumatic insemination in bed bugs.