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Science News | Science Current Events | Brightsurf | August 25, 2018


A smartphone application can help in screening for atrial fibrillation
A smartphone application (app) can help in screening for atrial fibrillation, according to late breaking results from the DIGITAL-AF study presented today at ESC Congress.
Study investigates major cause of heart attacks in women
Munich, Germany -- Aug. 25, 2018: The initial findings of a study on spontaneous coronary artery dissection, a major cause of heart attacks in women, are reported today in a late breaking science session at ESC Congress 2018.
Unnecessary heart procedures can be avoided with non-invasive test
Unnecessary heart procedures can be avoided with a non-invasive test, according to late breaking research presented today at ESC Congress 20181 and published in Journal of the American College of Cardiology.
Too much of a good thing? Very high levels of 'good' cholesterol may be harmful
Very high levels of high-density lipoprotein (HDL or 'good') cholesterol may be associated with an increased risk of heart attack and death, according to research presented today at ESC Congress 2018.
I have had a heart attack. Do I need open heart surgery or a stent?
New advice on the choice between open heart surgery and inserting a stent via a catheter after a heart attack is launched today.
Pregnant women with heart disease should give birth at no later than 40 weeks gestation
Pregnant women with heart disease should give birth at no later than 40 weeks gestation.
Scans cut heart attack rates and save lives, major study finds
Heart scans for patients with chest pains could save thousands of lives, research led by the University of Edinburgh suggests.
Do doctors really know how to diagnose a heart attack?
Confusion over how to diagnose a heart attack is set to be cleared up with new guidance launched today.
Single pill with two drugs could transform blood pressure treatment
A single pill with two drugs could transform blood pressure treatment, according to the 2018 European Society of Cardiology (ESC) and European Society of Hypertension (ESH) Guidelines on arterial hypertension published online today in European Heart Journal, and on the ESC website.
Why the effects of a boozy binge could last longer than you think
A new study suggests that the effects of alcohol on our mental processing could extend to the day after a session of heavy drinking.

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