Brightsurf Science News & Current Events

September 21, 2018
Eight of 10 people with cancer risk genes don't know it
Genomic screening of more than 50,000 people shows that more than 80 percent of those who carry an identifiable genetic risk for breast, ovarian, prostate, and pancreatic cancer don't know it despite frequent interaction with the healthcare system.

Space-related start-up technology companies create synergistic innovation
Researchers have developed innovative business models underlying the successful launch of space-related start-up technology companies in Costa Rica.

MSU-Spectrum Health researchers identify new genetic disorder
Researchers from Michigan State University College of Human Medicine and physicians from Spectrum Health have identified for the first time in a human patient a genetic disorder only previously described in animal models.

Advancing life sciences research with the internet of things
The internet of things (IoT) is allowing scientists to optimize laboratory operations and combine instruments to measure and respond to complex experimental conditions.

Cooking with wood or coal is linked to increased risk of respiratory illness and death
Burning wood or coal to cook food is associated with increased risk of hospitalization or dying from respiratory diseases, according to new research conducted in China and published online in the American Thoracic Society's American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

Study of protein 'trafficker' provides insight into autism and other brain disorders
Researchers have discovered that the protein ASTN2 shuttles receptors away from the surface of neurons, a process that facilitates efficient brain activity.

Researchers successfully train employees to respond to opioid overdose, administer naloxone
A small study shows that business managers and staff -- such as those running coffee shops and fast-food restaurants -- can be trained to reverse opioid overdoses, which are known to occur in public bathrooms.

Three NASA missions return 1st-light data
NASA's continued quest to explore our solar system and beyond received a boost of new information this week with three key missions proving not only that they are up and running, but that their science potential is exceptional.

Researchers explore how changes in diet alter microbiome in artificial intestine
Using an artificial intestine they created, researchers have shown that the microbiome can quickly adapt from the bacterial equivalent of a typical western diet to one composed exclusively of dietary fats.

New findings on the muscle disease Laing early-onset distal myopathy
New avenues are now being opened for future treatment of Laing distal myopathy, a rare disorder that causes muscles in the feet, hands and elsewhere to atrophy.

Barrow Researchers deploy novel clinical trial regimen for glioblastoma
Combating glioblastoma remains a major challenge due the complex nature of these tumors, the inability of drugs to penetrate the brain tissue, and lack of correlation between animal models and the human condition.

Latest research hints at predicting autism risk for pregnant mothers
Researchers at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute--led by Juergen Hahn, professor and head of biomedical engineering--are continuing to make remarkable progress with their research focused on autism spectrum disorder (ASD).

DNA vaccine leads to immune responses in HPV-related head and neck cancer
A therapeutic vaccine can boost antibodies and T cells, helping them infiltrate tumors and fight off human papillomavirus (HPV)-related head and neck cancer.

Ocean acidification may reduce sea scallop fisheries
Each year, fishermen harvest more than $500 million worth of Atlantic sea scallops from the waters off the east coast of the United States.

FDA researchers report first evidence of ESBL producing E. Coli in US retail meat
A new study using antimicrobial susceptibility testing and whole genome sequencing to test extended spectrum beta lactamase (ESBL) producing E. coli isolated from cattle for food production and from various retail meat products has shown that all were resistant to at least three antimicrobial classes.

It's not just for kids -- even adults appear to benefit from a regular bedtime
In a study of 1,978 older adults publishing Sept. 21, 2018, in the journal Scientific Reports, researchers at Duke Health and the Duke Clinical Research Institute found people with irregular sleep patterns weighed more, had higher blood sugar, higher blood pressure, and a higher projected risk of having a heart attack or stroke within 10 years than those who slept and woke at the same times every day.

Genomic study brings us closer to precision medicine for type 2 diabetes
Most patients with type 2 diabetes are treated with a 'one-size-fits-all' protocol, but this approach can leave many cases inadequately managed.

Light pollution makes fish more courageous
Artificial light at night also makes guppies more courageous during the day, according to a behavioural study led by researchers from the Leibniz-Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries (IGB) and the Max Planck Institute for Human Development.

A Trojan Horse delivery for treating a rare, potentially deadly, blood-clotting disorder
In proof-of-concept experiments, University of Alabama at Birmingham researchers have highlighted a potential therapy for a rare but potentially deadly blood-clotting disorder, TTP.

Checklist helps assess early feeding skills in premature infants
Infants born prematurely face challenges in developing the complex, interrelated skills needed for effective feeding.

Combining multiple CCTV images could help catch suspects
Combining multiple poor quality CCTV images into a single, computer-enhanced composite could improve the accuracy of facial recognition systems used to identify criminal suspects, new research suggests.

Deep neural networks help to identify the neutrinoless double beta decay signal
A recent study reveals that deep convolutional neural networks can significantly improve the efficiency of discrimination between neutrinoless double beta decay signals and backgrounds, thus the detection efficiency could be improved accordingly.

Study: Emissions from most diesel cars in Europe greatly exceed laboratory testing levels
A new MIT study reports that Volkswagen is not the only auto manufacturer to make diesel cars that produce vastly more emissions on the road than in laboratory tests.

Spray-on antennas could unlock potential of smart, connected technology
In research recently published in Science Advances, a group of Drexel University engineering researchers reports a method for spraying invisibly thin antennas, made from a type of two-dimensional, metallic material called MXene, that perform as well as those being used in mobile devices, wireless routers and portable transducers.

BU researchers define possible molecular pathway for neurodegeneration in prion diseases
A new study has shed light on the mechanisms underlying the progression of prion diseases and identified a potential target for treatment.

Philly refinery fails to include public input in cleanup efforts
New research uncovers Sunoco's decade-long effort to cleanup legacy contamination at the East Coast's oldest and largest petroleum refinery site did not include legally required public Involvement.

Proof-of-concept HIV immunotherapy study passes Phase 1 safety trial
Preliminary results from a phase I clinical trial have demonstrated the safety and tolerability of a cell therapy involving the ex vivo expansion of T cells and their subsequent infusion into HIV-infected individuals previously treated with antiretroviral therapy (ART).

New battery gobbles up carbon dioxide
New technology developed at MIT could use carbon dioxide captured from power plants to make a new kind of lithium battery.

Breast milk may be best for premature babies' brain development
Babies born before their due date show better brain development when fed breast milk rather than formula, a study from the University of Edinburgh has found.

AFib linked to family history in blacks, Latinos
Study shows there is a genetic predisposition to early-onset AFib in blacks and Latinos that is greater than what is observed in whites.

Scientists discovered 20 new gnat species in Brazil
In cooperation of scientists from Estonia, Finland and Brazil 20 new species of gnat were found in Brazilian Atlantic Forest.

Is survival associated with time to defibrillation for in-hospital cardiac arrest in pediatric patients?
The time until a first attempt at defibrillation in pediatric patients who experienced cardiac arrest in the hospital wasn't associated with survival or other main outcomes.

Patient-centered visual aid helps physicians discuss risks, treatments with parents
A series of illustrations and charts designed as decision aids for parents of children with minor head injuries helped them communicate with emergency medicine physicians and make informed decisions about their child's care.

New nanotherapy offers hope in treating drug-resistant renal cell carcinoma
A research team led by Arun Iyer, Ph.D., assistant professor of pharmaceutical sciences in the Eugene Applebaum College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences at Wayne State University, has developed a nanoplatform technology that works in combination with existing chemotherapeutic drugs that may reverse drug-resistance in renal cell carcinoma.

Lyme disease: A study on the speed of transmission by infected ticks
Lyme borreliosis is a disease caused by bacteria of the genus Borrelia that are transmitted by a bite from a tick of the genus Ixodes.

Outbreak of preventable eye infection in contact lens wearers
A new outbreak of a rare but preventable eye infection that can cause blindness, has been identified in contact lens wearers in a new study led by UCL and Moorfields Eye Hospital researchers.

Scientists have discovered how to predict life of implants without animal testing
An international team of researchers consisting of scientists from NUST MISIS and TU Dortmund University has developed a technology to study the behavior of orthopedic implants in laboratory conditions as close as possible to the human body.

The link between cognitive function and sexuality in older adults
Researchers learn more about the relationship between sexual behavior, function, and cognition (people's ability to think and make decisions).

Brown researchers teach computers to see optical illusions
By making a neural-network computer model that can be fooled by optical illusions like humans, the researchers advanced knowledge of the human visual system and may help improve artificial vision.

New research reveals a mitochondrial gene that protects against Alzheimer's disease
New research from USC has uncovered a previously unknown genetic risk factor for Alzheimer's disease and related dementias.

NASA sees areas of strength in Tropical Storm Trami
NASA's Terra satellite provided an infrared look at Tropical Storm Trami, located just over 100 miles from Guam on Sept.

Pre-clinical success for a universal flu vaccine offers hope for third generation approach
Researchers from the University of Oxford's Department of Zoology have demonstrated pre-clinical success for a universal flu vaccine in a new paper published in Nature Communications.

New study estimates the caregiving costs for families
In a new study, researchers focused on one of the most common caregiving arrangements: daughters between the ages of 40 and 70 who were likely to need to provide informal care to their mothers at some point in the near future.

The first predators and their self-repairing teeth
The earliest predators appeared on Earth 480 million years ago -- and they even had teeth which were capable of repairing themselves.

In zebrafish, a way to find new cancer therapies, targeting tumor modulators
Fast-breeding zebrafish, combined with fluorescent tagging, could be a powerful way to find new cancer drugs.

Tobacco display ban linked to fewer children buying cigarettes in shops
Removing displays of tobacco products from shops may have reduced the proportion of children buying cigarettes by 17 percent, according to new research from Imperial College London.

Helping parents decide on care for children with minor head trauma
More than 450,000 children visit emergency departments every year because of head trauma and many will undergo head computed tomography (CT) imaging, although few scans will show evidence of traumatic brain injury.

EACS issues position paper to improve cancer research and care
The European Academy of Cancer Sciences (EACS), an independent advisory body of medical specialists and researchers, has issued a position paper encouraging the European Union and its member states to formally launch a mission to boost and streamline cancer research.

Insulin shows great potential against chronic colitis
Diabetes is not the only disease on which insulin has an effect, it appears.
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