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Science Current Events and Science News | Brightsurf | October 05, 2018


Digital marketing exposure increases energy drink usage among young adults
Energy drinks represent a new category of nonalcoholic beverage with global sales of over $50 billion.
Energy insecure New Yorkers face multiple health risks
Nearly one-third of Washington Heights residents surveyed report problems with lack of heat in the winter and/or paying their electric bills.
Novel use of NMR sheds light on easy-to-make electropolymerized catalysts
In the world of catalytic reactions, polymers created through electropolymerization are attracting renewed attention.
Underestimating combined threats of deforestation and wildlife trade will push Southeast Asian birds
The combined impact of deforestation and wildlife exploitation on bird numbers is severely underestimated and could lead to some species becoming extinct, a joint study by the University of Sheffield and National University of Singapore has found.
Cleaning procedure prevents therapy dogs from spreading MRSA to children with cancer
Therapy dogs help ease stress in young patients with cancer, but can spread methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), putting vulnerable kids at risk for a serious infection.
New EASD-ADA consensus guidelines on managing hyperglycaemia in type 2 diabetes launched at EASD meeting
Following a review of the latest evidence --including a range of recent trials of drug and lifestyle interventions -- the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) and the American Diabetes Association (ADA) have produced an updated consensus statement on how to manage hyperglycaemia (high blood sugar) in patients with type 2 diabetes.
Nanopore technology with DNA computing easily detects microRNA patterns of lung cancer
Researchers at Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology (TUAT) have developed a simple technique that allows detection of two independent microRNAs as an early diagnosis marker of Small Cell Lung Cancer (SCLC) , which is very aggressive.
Alaskan carbon assessment has implications for national climate policy
A collection of articles in Ecological Applications provides a synthesis of the Alaska terrestrial and aquatic carbon cycle.
Nanoscale pillars as a building block for future information technology
Researchers from Linköping University and the Royal Institute of Technology in Sweden propose a new device concept that can efficiently transfer the information carried by electron spin to light at room temperature -- a stepping stone towards future information technology.
Health insurer policies may discourage use of non-opioid alternatives for lower back pain
Public and private health insurance policies in the US are missing important opportunities to encourage the use of physical therapy, psychological counseling and other non-drug alternatives to opioid medication for treating lower back pain, a study led by researchers at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health has found.
Studies needed on impact of cannabis use on puberty
Samaan and his research team at McMaster set out to find studies on boys and girls under age 18 with exposure to recreational or medicinal cannabis.
Cancer death disparities linked to poverty, lifestyle factors nationwide
Yale researchers have identified factors that may contribute to widening cancer death disparities among counties across the United States.
ASU research graces cover of ACS journal
Gary Moore, an assistant professor in the School of Molecular Sciences and a researcher with the Biodesign Center for Applied Structural Discovery, and his team won the coveted honor when their research article, ''Electrocatalytic Properties of Binuclear Cu(II) Fused Porphyrins for Hydrogen Evolution,'' was selected for the cover of the October edition of ACS Catalysis.
Consumers willing to pay more for sustainably brewed beer, study finds
More and more breweries are investing in practices to save energy and reduce greenhouse gases.
Participants in dementia prevention research motivated by altruism
Researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine, with collaborators across the country, report that people who participate in dementia prevention trials are primarily motivated by altruism and pleased to help.
New details of HIV life cycle
The discovery of a small molecule that plays an important part of the HIV life cycle may lead to the development of new treatments for the virus.
Outpatient antibiotic overprescribing rampant
Clinicians prescribed antibiotics without an infection-related diagnosis nearly half of the time and one in five prescriptions were provided without an in-person visit, according to research being presented at IDWeek 2018.
Tumor necrosis associate with atherosclerotic lipid accumulation
Atherosclerosis is regarded as a chronic inflammatory disease associated with changes in the innate immune system functioning and cytokine disturbances.
Researchers discover how fatal biofilms form
By severely curtailing the effects of antibiotics, the formation of organized communities of bacterial cells known as biofilms can be deadly during surgeries and in urinary tract infections.
American hospitals make it too hard for patients to access medical records
Many top hospitals in the United States are making it unduly confusing or expensive for patients to gain access to their own medical records, say researchers at Yale.
NASA investigates Tropical Storm Kong-Rey's rainfall rates
The Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM core satellite passed over Tropical Storm Kong-Rey and analyzed the rates in which rain was falling throughout the storm.
How the brain learns during sleep
Researchers from Ruhr-Universität Bochum and the University of Bonn have investigated which activity patterns occur in the brain when people remember or forget things.
Gene signature predicts outcome after spinal cord injury
Scientists have determined a gene signature that is linked to the severity of spinal cord injury in animals and humans, according to a study in the open-access journal eLife.
The urban training intervention increases physical activity in COPD patients
Increasing physical activity in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a key strategy -- and a major challenge -- in the fight against this respiratory disorder.
Protein dynamics: Molecular machines at work
Researchers from Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich have used a special fluorescence-based imaging technique to track the shape changes that occur when pore proteins in the cell membrane export molecules into the extracellular medium.
University of Toronto chemists advance ability to control chemical reactions
University of Toronto chemists led by Nobel Prize-winning researcher John Polanyi have found a way to select the outcome of chemical reaction by employing an elusive and long-sought factor known as the 'impact parameter' -- the miss-distance by which a reagent molecule misses a target molecule, thereby altering the products of chemical reaction.
Nanoplatform developed with three molecular imaging modalities for tumor diagnosis
Nanotechnology and biotechnology are bringing us increasingly closer to personalised cancer treatment.
New cancer vaccine platform a potential tool for efficacious targeted cancer therapy
Researchers at the University of Helsinki have discovered a solution in the form of a cancer vaccine platform for improving the efficacy of oncolytic viruses used in cancer treatment.
Study finds standard treatment for common STD doesn't eliminate parasite in some women
A new study led by an infectious disease epidemiologist at Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine could change the way doctors treat a common sexually transmitted disease.
Sink traps are surprising source of antibiotic-resistant bacteria in ICU
During a nationwide outbreak of healthcare-associated infections of an antibiotic-resistant bacteria, an Israeli hospital traced repeated infections of patients in its intensive care unit (ICU) to an unexpected source -- sink traps, according to a study published today in Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology, the journal of the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America.
How has children's body image changed over time?
Results from a Chinese nationwide survey indicate that the prevalence of childhood overweight/obesity nearly tripled from 6.5 percent to 16.8 percent from 2000-2011, but children's perception of being fat remained at 2 percent.
New spheres trick, trap and terminate water contaminant
Rice University scientists enhance micron-sized titanium dioxide particles to trap and destroy BPA, a contaminant in water with health implications.
Education improves decision-making ability, study finds
A new study led by Hyuncheol Bryant Kim, assistant professor of policy analysis and management at Cornell University, found that education can be leveraged to help enhance an individual's economic decision-making quality or economic rationality.
Could treating psoriasis in the future be as easy as going online?
New research from the Keck School of Medicine of USC finds that an online care delivery model is equivalent to in-person care for improving psoriasis symptoms.
Lunar craters named in honor of Apollo 8
The Working Group for Planetary System Nomenclature of the International Astronomical Union has today officially approved the naming of two craters on the Moon to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 8 mission.
Study examines processes to request patient medical records in US Hospitals
Patients can face barriers when trying to obtain their medical records and a study of top-ranked US hospitals suggests noncompliance with federal and state regulations regarding certain aspects of medical records request processes and discrepancies in information provided to patients may contribute.
'Turbidity currents' are not just currents, but involve movement of the seafloor itself
A new paper shows that turbidity currents in submarine canyons often involve large-scale movement of the seafloor.
Study links individual HPV types to HIV infection
An international research team led by a UC Riverside scientist has for the first time identified individual types of the human papillomavirus, or HPV, that are specifically linked to HIV infection.
New function of a key component in the immune system discovered
The complement proteins that circulate in our blood are an important part of our immune system.
Scientists get the drop on the cell's nucleus
A team of physicists has devised a novel strategy that uses naturally occurring motions inside the human cell nucleus to measure the physical properties of the nucleus and its components.
Larger cities have smaller water footprint than less populated counterparts
Global sustainability is important now more than ever due to increasing urban populations and the resulting stress it can have on natural resources.
How to make a lab-on-a-chip clear and biocompatible (with less blood splatter)
Lab-on-a-chip devices harness electrical signals to measure glucose, tell apart blood type and detect viruses or cancer.
Typical mutations in children of radar soldiers
The offspring of radar soldiers exposed to high doses of radiation during their service experience more genetic alterations than families without radiation exposure.
UTMB develops a universal vaccine platform that's cheaper and shelf stable
Researchers at The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston have developed less expensive way to produce vaccines that cuts the costs of vaccine production and storage by up to 80 percent without decreasing safety or effectiveness.
NASA looks at large Leslie lingering in Atlantic
NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the Central Atlantic Ocean and obtained infrared data on Leslie, now weakened to a large tropical storm.
New method measures single molecules from nanoliter of blood in real time
University of Groningen scientists, led by Associate Professor of Chemical Biology Giovanni Maglia, have designed a nanopore system that is capable of measuring different metabolites simultaneously in a variety of biological fluids, all in a matter of seconds.
Bag a job, bag your prey
How many jobs should an applicant consider before accepting the next job offer?
UCalgary scientists discover a new way to eliminate allergen-induced asthma attacks
University of Calgary scientists with the Alberta Children's Hospital Research Institute and Hotchkiss Brain Institute at the Cumming School of Medicine have discovered another way to help asthmatics breathe more easily by targeting treatment at the nervous system.

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