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Science Current Events and Science News | Brightsurf | October 12, 2018


A new study indicates the possibility to monitor the progression of Alzheimer's Disease by monitoring major brain antioxidant levels using noninvasive techniques
In a breakthrough human study, anti-oxidant, glutathione (GSH), which protects the brain from stress, has been found to be significantly depleted in Alzheimer's patients compared to normal subjects.
Scientists discovered genes that contribute to the ADHD development
A team from I.M. Sechenov First Moscow State Medical University together with foreign colleagues analyzed the genomes of several families that have members with ADHD.
Basophils -- Underestimated players in lung development
The adult lung consists of highly specialized cell types that are protected by a variety of immune cells.
Potential therapy for treatment-resistant hypothyroidism proves effective in lab study
A new 'metal-coordinated' drug-delivery technology potentially could be used to supplement the standard therapy for hypothyroidism, which affects nearly 10 million Americans, and many more patients worldwide, according to results of a study published in the journal Thyroid this month.
UT Dallas study provides fuller picture of the human cost from terrorist attacks
New research from The University of Texas at Dallas provides a more complete picture of the suffering caused by terrorist attacks.
Medical marijuana for symptoms in patients with multiple sclerosis
This study analyzed 17 clinical trials including 3,161 patients to evaluate medicinal cannabinoids -- the chemical compounds in cannabis -- for the treatment of symptoms in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS).
Cancer stem cells use normal genes in abnormal ways
University of Colorado Cancer Center study shows that CDK1 directly interacts with Sox2 to keep cancer cells 'stemmy.'
Early changes to synapse gene regulation may cause Alzheimer's disease
TMDU-led Japanese research revealed a role for splicing proteins in the pathology of Alzheimer's disease.
Effects of epilepsy on neural activity in mice fluctuate with reproductive cycle
Mice with epilepsy have altered patterns of neuron activity in the portion of the brain that controls the reproductive endocrine system, University of Illinois researchers report in a new study.
Religious freedom laws linked to poor health in LGBT people
After Indiana's passage of a Religious Freedom Restoration Act in 2015, sexual minorities increasingly reported poor health on a national survey.
NAM special publication outlines steps toward making health care systems fully interoperable
While health care has made great strides in recent years with the proliferation of electronic health records (EHRs), establishment of regional health information exchanges, and development of data exchange standards and interfaces, interoperability among health care technologies remains very limited, says a new National Academy of Medicine (NAM) special publication.
NASA tracks post-Tropical Cyclone Michael's heavy rains to Northeastern US
NASA satellite imagery showed that although Michael's center was off-shore of the Delmarva Peninsula and over the western Atlantic Ocean, rain from its western quadrant was affecting the northeastern US
Why don't we understand statistics? Fixed mindsets may be to blame
The first study of why people struggle to solve statistical problems reveals a preference for complicated rather than simpler, more intuitive solutions -- which often leads to failure in solving the problem altogether.
Study provides insights on the effects of exercise on cognitive performance
A new British Journal of Psychology study has looked at the details behind how cognitive performance may improve during aerobic exercise.
Study: Ketogenic diet appears to prevent cognitive decline in mice
The Ketogenic Diet, simple caloric restriction, or the pharmaceutical rapamycin appear to improve neurovascular function and prevent cognitive decline in animal models.
Innovative tool allows continental-scale water, energy, and land system modeling
A new large-scale hydroeconomic model, developed by the Water Program at IIASA, will allow researchers to study water systems across whole continents, looking at sustainability of supply and the impacts of water management on the energy and agricultural sectors.
A new mechanism for how animal cells stay intact
Watching the movement of every cell in an adult animal all at once, the Prakash lab discovered ultra-fast cellular contractions.
High-performance self-assembled catalyst for SOFC
An international team of researchers , affiliated with South Korea's Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST) has unveiled a novel catalyst that can significantly enhance the performance of perovskite electrodes in Solid Oxide Fuel Cell.
Little supernova is big discovery: The origin of binary neutron stars
An international research team discovered the first recorded 'ultra-stripped supernova,' a rare, faint type of supernova that is believed to play a role in the formation of binary neutron star systems.
Researchers quickly harvest 2-D materials, bringing them closer to commercialization
Researchers in the Department of Mechanical Engineering at MIT have developed a technique to harvest 2-inch diameter wafers of 2-D material within just a few minutes.
Diabetic patients are more at risk of death from alcohol, accidents and suicide
Diabetic patients are more likely to die from alcohol-related factors, accidents or suicide, according to a study published in the European Journal of Endocrinology.
How the grid cell system of the brain maps mental spaces
How exactly the grid cell system works in the human brain, and in particular with which temporal dynamics, has until now been speculation.
Did mosasaurs hunt like killer whales?
University of Cincinnati professor Takuya Konishi examined the youngest-ever specimen of tylosaur ever found.
Simple, cost effective treatment following failed back surgery shows promise
Failed back surgery (continued low back and leg pain after surgery) is relatively common.
Obesity linked to increased risk of early-onset colorectal cancer
Women who are overweight or obese have up to twice the risk of developing colorectal cancer before age 50 as women who have what is considered a normal body mass index (BMI), according to new research led by Washington University School of Medicine in St.
NASA sees Tropical Cyclone Luban nearing Oman
Tropical Cyclone Luban continued to track toward Oman as NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over the Northern Indian Ocean.
Microfluidic molecular exchanger helps control therapeutic cell manufacturing
Researchers have demonstrated an integrated technique for monitoring specific biomolecules -- such as growth factors -- that could indicate the health of living cell cultures produced for the burgeoning field of cell-based therapeutics.
Benzodiazepines in patients with COPD and PTSD may increase suicide risk
Long-term use of benzodiazepine medications in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, or COPD, as well as posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) may lead to increased suicide risk, according to a study published online in the Annals of the American Thoracic Society.
Oscillations provide insights into the brain's navigation system
The brain creates a map of our environment, which enables reliable spatial navigation.
Quantifying evolutionary impacts of humans on the biosphere is harder than it seems
Are human disturbances to the environment driving evolutionary changes in animals and plants?
Disrupting crystalline order to restore superfluidity
What if you could disrupt the crystalline order of quantum matter so that the superfluid could flow freely even at temperatures and pressures where it usually does not?
Understanding the neurological code behind how flies fly
Discoveries about the neurological processes by which flies stay steady in flight by researchers at Case Western Reserve University could help humans build more responsive drones or better-balanced robots.
Study: No surge in illicit cigarettes after menthol ban
Contrary to the tobacco industry's assertions, there was no surge in illicit cigarettes after a 2015 ban on menthol cigarette sales in the Canadian province of Nova Scotia, according to a brief report in Tobacco Control.
Unapproved ingredients in over-the-counter supplements
Potentially harmful and undeclared pharmaceuticals were identified in more than 700 over-the-counter dietary supplements in an analysis of US Food and Drug Administration warnings from 2007 through 2016.
Irrigating vegetables with wastewater in African cities may spread disease
Urban farmers growing vegetables to feed millions of people in Africa's ever-growing cities could unwittingly be helping to spread disease by irrigating crops with wastewater, a new study reveals.
Classifying microbes differently leads to discovery
Changing the way microbes are classified can reveal similarities among mammals' gut microbiomes, according to a new study published in mBio that proposes an alternative method for classifying microbes to provide insight into human and environmental health.
Goldilocks principle in biology -- fine-tuning the 'just right' signal load
In 'Goldilock and the Three Bears', Goldilock finds that only one bowl of porridge has the ''just right'' temperature, and in the same way within biology, you can find the 'just right' conditions -- called the Goldilocks principle.
Satellite finds wind shear battering Tropical Storm Nadine
Tropical Storm Nadine continues to be battered by vertical wind shear, winds that can tear a tropical cyclone apart.
New catalyst opens door to CO2 capture in conversion of coal to liquid fuels
World energy consumption projections expect coal to stay one of the world's main energy sources in the coming decades, and a growing share of it will be used in CTL, the conversion of coal to liquid fuels.
Promising new therapeutic approach against Ebola virus identified
In a new study researchers have developed a two-pronged approach for targeting Ebola virus infection using linked nucleic acid (LNA) antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs)designed to interfere both genes essential for translation of Ebola virus genes and to block production of an intracellular human protein needed for the virus to enter cells.
NASA sees Sergio's rains sweep into the US Southwest
NASA's Aqua satellite captured an infrared image of Tropical Storm Sergio's clouds and rainfall sweeping into the southwestern US.
NASA tracking Hurricane Leslie toward Southern Spain, Portugal
NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over the Eastern Atlantic Ocean and captured a visible image of Hurricane Leslie as it continues to travel toward southern Spain and Portugal.
Clues that suggest people are lying may be deceptive, study shows
The verbal and physical signs of lying are harder to detect than people believe, a study suggests.
Does open heart surgery affect cognitive abilities?
Understanding how heart valve surgery may affect your cognition is important for older adults.
A new way to create molecules for drug development
Chemists at The Ohio State University have developed a new and improved way to generate molecules that can enable the design of new types of synthetic drugs.
NIH programs shed light on gene variants and their connections to health and disease
NIH's Clinical Genome Resource (ClinGen) and ClinVar programs are addressing a major barrier to incorporating genomic medicine into healthcare, which is a lack of evidence about the relationship between gene variants and diseases.
Widespread errors in 'proofreading' cause inherited blindness
Research has shown that mistakes in 'proofreading' the genetic code of retinal cells is the cause of a form of inherited blindness, retinitis pigmentosa (RP) with splicing factor defects, which affects up to 2.5 million people worldwide.
Two seemingly opposing forces in the brain actually cooperate to enhance memory formation
The brain has a way to keep nervous activity in check as we learn new things and consolidate memories.
An RNA key that unlocks innate immunity
New research from Emory University, published in the Journal of Biological Chemistry, shows that a versatile RNA molecule may be a key player in human cells' frontline defenses against viruses.
Calm the immune system, halt premature birth
Cytokines, small proteins that alert the body to infection and cause inflammation, have been found in the amniotic fluid of many women who gave birth prematurely.
Graphene shows unique potential to exceed bandwidth demands of future telecommunications
Graphene Flagship industrial and academic partners published a new paper in Nature Reviews Materials analysing the possibilities of graphene in the internet of everything market, expected to reach over 12 billion connected devices in 2020
Tropical moths in the mountains are larger
Researchers from Friedrich Schiller University Jena (Germany) and two further universities have measured more than 19,000 tropical moths from 1,100 species to find out whether their size varies with elevation.
Building a better battery layer by layer
A team of researchers from Shinshu University in Nagano, Japan is now closer to a thin, high-capacity lithium-ion battery that could open the gates to better energy storage systems for electric vehicles.
Does climate vary more from century to century when it is warmer?
Century-scale climate variability was enhanced when the Earth was warmer during the Last Interglacial period (129,000-116,000 years ago) compared to the current interglacial (the last 11,700 years), according to a new UCL-led study.
Sidestepping the pitfalls of overconfidence with plausible deniability
Although confidence can serve as both a blessing and a curse, new research from the University of Notre Dame shows how people can reap the rewards without risking the social penalties for overconfidence.
Early Alzheimer's brain pathology linked to psychiatric symptoms
UC San Francisco researchers, in collaboration with the unique Brazilian Biobank for Aging Studies (BBAS) at the University of São Paulo, have shown that the earliest stages of the brain degeneration associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD) are linked to neuropsychiatric symptoms including anxiety, depression, loss of appetite, and sleep disturbances.
Is there a benefit to switching from flash monitoring to RT-CGM for hypoglycemia?
In follow-up to the I HART CGM study, which showed the benefit of real-time continuous glucose monitoring (RT-CGM) compared to flash monitoring for time spent in hypoglycemia among adults with type 1 diabetes at high hypoglycemia risk, researchers conducted an extension trial that assessed the effects of continuing RT-CGM or switching from flash to RT-CGM of the subsequent 8 weeks.
Abnormal vision in childhood can affect brain functions
A research team has discovered that abnormal vision in childhood can affect the development of higher-level brain areas responsible for things such as attention.
Economic analysis provides watershed moment for environmental groups
Economists have found that in the United States, watershed groups have had a positive impact on their local water quality.

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