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Science News | Science Current Events | Brightsurf | November 04, 2018


Trial finds diet rich in fish helps fight asthma
A clinical trial has shown eating fish such as salmon, trout and sardines as part of a healthy diet can reduce asthma symptoms in children.
WSU researchers see cognitive changes in offspring of heavy cannabis-using rats
Washington State University researchers have seen cognitive changes in the offspring of rats exposed to heavy amounts of cannabis.
Men with prostate cancer willing to accept lower survival odds to avoid side effects
Men who have been newly diagnosed with prostate cancer say they would trade some improvement in their odds of survival for improvements in side effects and quality of life, according to research presented at the 2018 NCRI Cancer Conference.
Studies highlight lasting effects of early life stress on the genome, gut, and brain
Excessive stress during fetal development or early childhood can have long-term consequences for the brain, from increasing the likelihood of brain disorders and affecting an individual's response to stress as an adult to changing the nutrients a mother may pass on to her babies in the womb.
Realizing the potential of gene therapy for neurological disorders
Promising findings from preclinical animal studies show the potential of gene therapy for treating incurable neurological disorders.
New glimpses into brain uncover neurological basis for processing social information
Neuroscientists are developing a clearer picture than ever before of how the animal brain processes social information, from status and competitive advantage in a group to the calls and vocalizations of peers.
Solitary confinement puts brains at risk
Some 80,000 Americans are incarcerated in solitary confinement on any given day, a practice that was deemed cruel and unusual punishment by the United Nations Committee on Torture.
Patients with low risk thyroid cancer can receive lower doses of radiation treatment
Thyroid cancer patients whose disease is at low risk of returning can be treated safely with a smaller amount of radiation following surgery, according to results from the world's longest running trial to investigate this -- the HiLo trial.
Melanoma death rates are rising in men but static or falling in women
The rate of men dying from malignant melanoma has risen in populations around the world, while in some countries the rates are steady or falling for women, according to research presented at the 2018 NCRI Cancer Conference.
New genetic cause of liver fat uncovered
New research has uncovered genetic variations that may contribute to the development of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), the leading cause of liver disease.
Griffith precision measurement takes it to the limit
Griffith University researchers have demonstrated a procedure for making precise measurements of speed, acceleration, material properties and even gravity waves possible, approaching the ultimate sensitivity allowed by laws of quantum physics.

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