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Science News | Science Current Events | Brightsurf | November 05, 2018


New material cleans and splits water
Researchers at EPFL's Institute of Chemical Sciences and Engineering have developed a photocatalytic system based on a material in the class of metal-organic frameworks.
People in Canada have good health, are living longer: Global Burden of Disease Study trends
Data from the Global Burden of Disease Study shows that the overall health of Canadians is good and is consistent with other similar countries, and people are living longer with diseases, according to a study in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal).
Resiliency in NICU parents may be linked to lower depression and anxiety
Parents of vulnerable newborns in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) who feel less resilient may experience more symptoms of psychological distress, including depression and anxiety.
Rutgers researchers advance stem cell therapy with biodegradable scaffold
Rutgers scientists have created a tiny, biodegradable scaffold to transplant stem cells and deliver drugs, which may help treat Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases, aging brain degeneration, spinal cord injuries and traumatic brain injuries.
Just one energy drink may hurt blood vessel function
Young, healthy adults experienced notably diminished blood vessel function soon after consuming one energy drink, according to preliminary research from a small study to be presented in Chicago at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2018, a premier global exchange of the latest advances in cardiovascular science for researchers and clinicians.
Adolescent brain development impacts mental health, substance use
Advances in understanding adolescent brain development may aid future treatments of mental illness and alcohol and substance use disorders.
Among college students, mental health diagnosis and treatment are up, stigma is down
Mental health diagnoses and treatment of college students increased substantially between 2007 and 2017.
Alcohol industry health campaigns miss the mark by a longshot
Far from confirming industry claims that they can 'do good' with corporate campaigns, the findings suggest that the public health benefits are likely to be minimal.
College education aids in proper use of dietary supplements among young adults
Young adults who are educated about dietary supplements in college are more likely to use them appropriately, according to new research from Binghamton University, State University at New York.
Breast cancer cells become invasive by changing their identity
Researchers from Karolinska Institutet in Sweden have identified a protein that determines the identity and invasive properties of breast cancer cells.
Meditation: An effective new therapy to reduce eye pressure in primary open-angle glaucoma
A new era in the management of glaucoma is ushered in by a landmark study published in the Journal of Glaucoma, Official Journal of the World Glaucoma Association.
Happy childhood memories linked to better health later in life
People who have fond memories of childhood, specifically their relationships with their parents, tend to have better health, less depression and fewer chronic illnesses as older adults, according to research published by the American Psychological Association.
Stroke survivors and those at risk urged to focus on yoga and tai chi
One of Australia's biggest health issues could be checked if more people took up yoga or tai chi and reduced their blood pressure, an Australian study has found.
Researchers uncover gene that regulates fat accumulation and obesity
A new study from Western University showed that regardless of diet, a protein called Pannexin 1 significantly regulates the accumulation of fat in mice.
Proton therapy for pediatric brain tumors has favorable cognitive outcomes
Proton therapy treatment for pediatric brain tumor patients is associated with better neurocognitive outcomes compared to x-ray radiation therapy according to a study by Northwestern Medicine.
More than intelligence needed for success in life
Research carried out at the University of Adelaide and the University of Bristol has examined long-held beliefs that success in school and careers is due to more than just high intelligence.
Cardiac arrest survival higher in states with required high school CPR training
Required CPR education in high school may lead to higher bystander CPR and cardiac arrest survival rates, according to preliminary research to be presented in Chicago at the American Heart Association's Resuscitation Science Symposium 2018 -- an international conference highlighting the best in cardiovascular resuscitation research.
Barriers to using stroke-preventing anticoagulants in Canada hinder appropriate management of patients with atrial fibrillation
International guidelines recommend direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) over warfarin to prevent stroke for most patients with atrial fibrillation (AF).
Air pollution linked to autism: study
Exposure to toxic air pollutants is linked to an increased risk of developing autism, according to a Monash University study of Chinese children during their first three-years of life.
Black infants may have higher cardiac arrest rates
Black infants were significantly more likely to suffer cardiac arrest than White or Hispanic children in a review of emergency response records in the Houston area.
Youth TBI laws promote head injury evaluation in emergency department
A new study from researchers in the Center for Injury Research and Policy at Nationwide Children's Hospital examined the effectiveness of state youth TBI laws by looking at sports and recreation mild TBI (mTBI)-related emergency department (ED) visits for children ages 5 to 18 years before and after TBI legislation was enacted in each state.
Daily weighing may be key to losing weight
Daily weighing may help with weight loss goals. People who don't weigh themselves at all or rarely were less likely to lose weight than those who weighed themselves often, according to research to be presented in Chicago at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2018, a premier global exchange of the latest advances in cardiovascular science for researchers and clinicians.
Nuts for nuts? Daily serving may help control weight and benefit health
Eating Brazil nuts and other varieties of nuts daily may prevent weight gain and provide other cardiovascular benefits, according to two separate preliminary studies to be presented at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2018 in Chicago, a premier global exchange of the latest advances in cardiovascular science for researchers and clinicians.
Timely care key to improving survival rates and racial disparities
Postoperative radiotherapy is needed within six weeks of surgery in patients with head and neck cancer, but delays are common.
Violence in childhood leads to accelerated aging, study finds
A new study of nearly 250 children and teens led by the University of Washington found that participants who had suffered abuse were developing faster than those who had not.
Health professionals need support to help children of terminally ill patients
Health professionals require more guidance to prepare and support children when a parent is dying, a new study in the journal Palliative Medicine reports.
Phobic anxiety is linked to sexuality issues in women who are breast cancer survivors
A University of Cordoba research project reveals that mental well-being is a determining factor in sexual dysfunction in women affected by this kind of cancer.
Can a dog ownership and training program improve symptoms of PTSD among veterans?
The results of a new integrative health study that measures the effects of owning and training a therapy dog on posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in veterans are published in JACM, The Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine.
Largest parasitic worm genetic study hatches novel treatment possibilities
The largest genomic study of parasitic worms to date identified hundreds of thousands of new genes and predicted many new potential drug targets and drugs.
Researchers use genetics to predict response to antipsychotic medications
Genetics can be used to predict a patient's response to antipsychotic drug treatment for schizophrenia, according to a recent study by investigators at The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research.
New device improves balance in veterans with Gulf War Illness
Gulf War veterans with unexplained illnesses that cause fatigue, headaches, respiratory disorders and memory problems can improve their balance with a device developed by Rutgers University researchers.
Does dietary restriction protect against age-related leaky gut?
Flies on dietary restriction are protected from leaky gut and systemic inflammation as they age.
Sitting is NOT the new smoking, contrary to popular myth
No, sitting is not the new smoking, despite what countless newspaper articles have peddled in recent years.
Laser architecture can create complex structures to probe, control matter
A new laser architecture called the universal light modulator, an intriguing new tool to probe and control matter, will be presented during the Optical Society's (OSA) Laser Congress, Nov.
Laser tech could be fashioned into Earth's 'porch light' to attract alien astronomers
If extraterrestrial intelligence exists somewhere in our galaxy, a new MIT study proposes that laser technology on Earth could, in principle, be fashioned into something of a planetary porch light -- a beacon strong enough to attract attention from as far as 20,000 light years away.
Study could help explain how childhood stress contributes to anxiety, depression
New research could help explain why stress early in life can create vulnerabilities to mood and anxiety disorders later on.
Opioid use may increase risk of dangerous heart rhythm disorder
Opioid use appears to increase a person's risk for developing atrial fibrillation, a dangerous heart-rhythm disorder known to cause strokes, according to preliminary research to be presented in Chicago at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2018, a premier global exchange of the latest advances in cardiovascular science for researchers and clinicians.
Does having muscle weakness and obesity lead to falls for older women?
A team of researchers writing for the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society suggested that it is important to identify people at risk for falls related to obesity and muscle weakness so that healthcare providers can offer appropriate solutions.
Team studying rare disorder discovers novel way to target melanoma
While studying a rare genetic disorder called NGLY1 deficiency, UNT Health Science Center researchers discovered a new targeted treatment for combating melanoma, a skin cancer that kills about 9,000 people in the United States each year.
Music improves social communication in autistic children
Improved communication skills may be linked to increased connectivity between auditory and motor regions of the brain, researchers at Université de Montreal and McGill University find.
Peers, student attitudes, and student deviance in Japan and the United States
This study presents evidence on the cross-cultural generalizability of differential association/social learning theory.
Drinking coffee may reduce your chances of developing Alzheimer's, Parkinson's
A new study out of the Krembil Brain Institute, part of the Krembil Research Institute, suggests drinking coffee may protect you against developing both Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease.
Scientists find potential path for countering oxidative stress in a range of diseases
Scientists at Scripps Research have made a surprising discovery in their mission to understand how cells stay healthy, uncovering an important connection between a cell's sugar metabolism and its antioxidant response.
Pitt researcher uses video games to unlock new levels of A.I.
Dr. Jiang designs algorithms that learn decision strategies in complex and uncertain environments like video games.
Fewer cardiac arrest victims get bystander CPR in Latino neighborhoods
Bystander CPR is provided less frequently in Latino neighborhoods compared to other areas.
Disrupted circadian rhythms may drive anxiety and exacerbate brain disorders
Sleep disruptions are associated with many brain disorders, including anxiety, dementias, and traumatic brain injury.
'Master key' gene has links to both ASD and schizophrenia
Researchers at Emory and the Chinese Academy of Sciences analyze mice partially lacking MIR-137.
Villagers follow the geology to safer water in Bangladesh
Water researchers have found a way to fight the 'king of poisons' that accounts for one of every 20 deaths in Bangladesh.
Nutrient-recycling microbes may feel the heat
While microbial communities are the engines driving the breakdown of dead plants and animals, little is known about whether they are equipped to handle big changes in climate.
Saber-toothed cats with oral injuries ate softer foods
Saber-toothed cats, the large felid predators that once roamed Southern California, may have eaten softer foods after suffering oral injuries, according to a new study.
Scientists propose panel to guide gene-editing decisions regarding conservation
Scientists from 10 universities say an international oversight panel is needed to guide decisions about whether and when to employ gene-editing technology to solve ecological problems.
New conservation approach
Findings show strong evidence for unique regions that divide plant and animal communities -- a major development in centuries-long debate
Researchers develop new technique to understand biology at the nanoscale
Washington State University researchers for the first time have shown that they can use electrical fields to gain valuable information about the tiny, floating vesicles that move around in animals and plants and are critically important to many biological functions.
Violent crime raises blood pressure even among those living in safe areas
A spike in Chicago crime was associated with a relative increase in blood pressure among people who lived in safe neighborhoods, according to preliminary research to be presented in Chicago at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2018, a premier global exchange of the latest advances in cardiovascular science for researchers and clinicians.
New study is a smoking gun, shows vaping is no deterrent to teen tobacco use
E-cigarettes don't mitigate the use of combustible cigarettes among teens.
The link between dementia and cardiovascular disease
Studies that link breakdowns in the brain's blood vessels to Alzheimer's disease and vascular dementia were presented today at Neuroscience 2018, the annual meeting of the Society for Neuroscience and the world's largest source of emerging news about brain science and health.
BU: Twitter users spreading sexual violence prevention strategies
In the wake of #MeToo, the hashtag #HowIWillChange asked men to come forward on Twitter to discuss ways in which they would change their own behavior to prevent sexual violence and mitigate harm for victims.
Researchers show that a high-protein diet does not affect kidney function
A widely held and controversial myth that high-protein diets may cause kidney damage in healthy adults has been debunked by scientists at McMaster University, who examined more than two dozen studies involving hundreds of participants.
A hypocaloric Mediterranean diet and daily exercise maintain weight loss
Following a Mediterranean diet low in calories and engaging daily physical activity have proved to reduce body weight and cardiovascular risk in patients with overweight and metabolic syndrome, and to maintain these benefits after one year.
Reanalyzing gene tests prompt new diagnoses in kids
A new study from UT Southwestern quantifies for the first time how quickly these rapid advancements in genomics may benefit patients.
New research links foods high in anthocyanins to a lower risk of cardiovascular disease
Wearing red has become a popular way to support the prevention of heart disease, the #1 killer of women.
Teachers and Trump
Teachers felt immense pressure from school leaders and families to respond in a certain way -- or not at all -- in their classrooms following the 2016 presidential election, according to new research from Michigan State University.
New attacks on graphics processors endanger user privacy
Web browsers use GPUs to render graphics on desktops, laptops, and smart phones.
Wealthier people do less in the struggle against climate change
A collective-risk dilemma experiment with members of the public in Barcelona has shown that people are more or less likely to contribute money to fighting climate change depending on their how wealthy they are.
New research shows symptom improvement after concussion in children varies
Age and sex must be taken into consideration when looking at children's recovery after a concussion, say researchers at the CHEO Research Institute.
Two novel studies explore why women receive less CPR from bystanders
Separate studies explore why women are less likely to receive bystander CPR.
Shorter sleep can lead to dehydration
Adults who sleep just six hours per night -- as opposed to eight -- may have a higher chance of being dehydrated, according to a study by Penn State.
Study: At-risk mothers receive less support, information on breastfeeding
University of Illinois postdoctoral research associate Carolyn Sutter found in a recent study that women who are at greater risk of breastfeeding cessation -- including single mothers, those with less education and mothers enrolled in the WIC program -- may have less access to resources that could provide helpful information and assistance.
Study shows movement, evolutionary history of TB in China
A genetic scan of a massive number of samples taken from tuberculosis patients across China has shown a surprising genetic uniformity: just two 'strains' of the tuberculosis bacterium account for 99.4 percent of all cases.
Fire ant colonies could inspire molecular machines, swarming robots
Researchers at CU Boulder have uncovered the statistical rules that govern how gigantic colonies of fire ants form bridges, ladders and floating rafts.
Could rising CO2 trigger return of eradicated mosquito-related disease?
A new study shows for the first time the impact that climate change is having on the rate in which mosquitos diversify, and what this might mean for human health in the future.
Clues for drugging the 'undruggable'
Nicolas Thomä's group at the Friedrich Miescher Institute for Biomedical Research (FMI) has joined forces with the group of Benjamin Ebert at Harvard's Broad Institute to show how thalidomide analogs mediate degradation of many more proteins than previously anticipated.
Chemical synthesis could produce more potent antibiotics
MIT researchers have shown that they can modify antibiotics in a way that could potentially make them more effective against drug-resistant infections.
Johns Hopkins scientist finds elusive star with origins close to Big Bang
Astronomers have found what could be one of the universe's oldest stars, made almost entirely of materials spewed from the Big Bang.
Laser blasting antimatter into existence
Antimatter is an exotic material that vaporizes when it contacts regular matter.
New stats apps show a virtual reality
Harnessing the power of virtual reality will help to visualize data and improve statistical models.
Recreating the sound of the Islamic past of the Mosque of Cordoba
Faced with the visual homogeneity of the interior of the Islamic mosque, the results obtained in the acoustic study allow us to confirm that the sound perception varies by area.
New NYU Abu Dhabi research suggests corals produce molecules that can help resist disease
In a new study published in Communications Biology, NYU Abu Dhabi Assistant Professor of Biology Shady Amin, along with Philippe Schmitt-Kopplin from the Helmholtz Center Munich, report that corals, though they are stationary organisms, can alter their surroundings by producing unique molecules that can help recruit healthy microbiomes and fight parasitic microbes.
Physicists create new, simpler-than-ever quantum 'hard drive for light'
Physicists at the University of Alberta in Canada have developed a new way to build quantum memories, a method for storing delicate quantum information encoded into pulses of light.
Cell transplant restores vision in rats
Sheets of fetal cells integrate into the retina and generate nearly normal visual activity in the brains of blind rats, reports new research published in JNeurosci.
Hydropower, innovations and avoiding international dam shame
For sweeping drama, it's hard to beat hydropower from dams -- a renewable source of electricity that helped build much of the developed world.
Hospital admissions for AFib rise with daylight saving time transition
Hospital admissions for atrial fibrillation (AFib), the most common type of irregular heartbeat, rise in the days following the spring transition of daylight saving time, according to preliminary research to be presented in Chicago at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2018, a premier global exchange of the latest advances in cardiovascular science for researchers and clinicians.
Blood vessel function takes harmful hit from hookah tobacco smoking
Smoking hookah tobacco acutely impairs blood vessels' ability to function, according to preliminary research to be presented in Chicago at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2018, a premier global exchange of the latest advances in cardiovascular science for researchers and clinicians.
NICE should change antibiotic guidelines for dental patients -- study shows
New research has revealed the impact a change in US guidelines had on the prescribing of antibiotic prophylaxis (AP) to prevent a life-threatening heart condition infective endocarditis (IE) in patients before undergoing invasive dental treatment.
Flying focus: Controlling lasers through time and space
Scientists have produced an extremely bright spot of light that can travel at any speed -- including faster than the speed of light.
Laboratory experiments probe the formation of stars and planets
The cosmos is a void dotted with stars and an ever-increasing number of newly-observed planets beyond our solar system.
Inside job: A new technique to cool a fusion reactor
Fusion offers the potential of near limitless energy by heating a gas trapped in a magnetic field to incredibly high temperatures where atoms are so energetic that they fuse together when they collide.
Physicists name and codify new field in nanotechnology: 'electron quantum metamaterials'
New materials are being synthesized by twisting and stacking atomically thin layers.
Mainz-Paris study: Cost overruns of Olympic Games comparable to other large-scale projects
Sports economists at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) in Germany in cooperation with the Université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne in France have compiled a comprehensive list of expenditures and revenues of the Olympic Games from Sydney 2000 to PyeongChang 2018.
Is there a universal hierarchy of human senses?
Research at the University of York has shown that the accepted hierarchy of human senses -- sight, hearing, touch, taste and smell -- is not universally true across all cultures.
Pulmonary TB can be cured with shorter treatment, study finds
Almost half of the nearly 10 million patients with active tuberculosis each year could potentially be cured with significantly shorter treatments than current guidelines recommend, a new analysis from UC San Francisco has found.
A faster, cheaper path to fusion energy
Scientists are working to dramatically speed up the development of fusion energy in an effort to deliver power to the electric grid soon enough to help mitigate impacts of climate change.
Chronic exposure to excess noise may increase risk for heart disease, stroke
Exposure to environmental noise appears to increase the risk of heart attacks and strokes by fueling the activity of a brain region involved in stress response.
Scientists develop method to quickly enhance immune-system proteins
Rice University scientists develop the simple pClick technique to attach drugs or other substances to antibodies, the powerful proteins that are central to the body's immune system.
Ground-penetrating radar reveals potential mass grave sites from the Holocaust
Researchers recently used ground penetrating radar to locate an unmarked, potential mass grave site in Lithuania, according to a new study that will be presented at The Geological Society of America's 2018 Annual Meeting in Indianapolis, Indiana, on Sunday, 4 November.
Was general anesthesia for surgery associated with risk of adverse child development in study of siblings?
Surgery under general anesthesia for young children before they started elementary school wasn't associated with increased risk of adverse child development outcomes compared with their biological siblings who didn't have surgery and after accounting for other potential biological and environmental factors. The study of children in Ontario, Canada, included 2,346 sibling pairs where only one sibling had surgery.
Researchers solve mystery surrounding a form of Batten disease
A team led by researchers at Baylor College of Medicine has uncovered an unexpected mechanism that can explain a form of Batten disease called neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis 8.
New gene therapy reprograms brain glial cells into neurons
A new gene therapy can turn certain brain glial cells into functioning neurons, which in turn could help repair the brain after a stroke or during neurological disorders like Alzheimer's or Parkinson's diseases.
Public AEDs cost-effective for saving lives, improving cardiac arrest outcomes
Automated external defibrillators (AEDs) accessible in public places are cost-effective health tools for saving lives and improving cardiac arrest survival, according to two separate research studies to be presented in Chicago at the American Heart Association's Resuscitation Science Symposium 2018, an international conference highlighting the best in cardiovascular resuscitation research.
Changing temperatures are helping corn production in US -- for now
Increased production of corn in the US has largely been credited to advances in farming technology but new research shows that changing temperatures play a significant role in crop yield.
Peak performance: new stellarator experiments show promising results
Imagine building a machine so advanced and precise you need a supercomputer to help design it.
New epilepsy warning device could save thousands of lives
A new high-tech bracelet, developed by scientists from the Netherlands detects 85 percent of all severe night-time epilepsy seizures.
Organisms with small genomes, cells found thriving in hot soils
As our planet warms, what life will survive and thrive?
Tethered antibodies present a potential new approach to prevent influenza virus infections
As co-leaders of an international collaboration, scientists at Scripps Research have discovered that tethering four antibodies together may be an effective strategy for neutralizing all types of influenza virus known to infect humans.
Coping with errors in the quantum age
Nowadays, quantum systems can be manipulated with extremely high, but not with perfect precision.
Caterpillar, fungus in cahoots to threaten fruit, nut crops, study finds
New research reveals that Aspergillus flavus, a fungus that produces carcinogenic aflatoxins that can contaminate seeds and nuts, has a multilegged partner in crime: the navel orangeworm caterpillar, which targets some of the same nut and fruit orchards afflicted by the fungus.
Turning marginal farmlands into a win for farmers and ecosystems
Many farms have areas where the ground either floods or does not retain enough water or fertilizer for crops to thrive.
Fern plant infusion keeps the doctor away in Medieval Europe
The remains of a medieval skeleton has shown the first physical evidence that a fern plant could have been used for medicinal purposes in cases such as alopecia, dandruff and kidney stones.
Enhanced views of Earth tectonics
Scientists from Germany's Kiel University and British Antarctic Survey (BAS) have used data from the European Space Agency (ESA), Gravity field and steady-state Ocean Circulation Explorer (GOCE) mission to unveil key geological features of the Earth's lithosphere -- the rigid outer layer that includes the crust and the upper mantle.
Big, high-calorie meals after 6 p.m. may increase heart disease risk for Hispanics
A big evening dinner shouldn't be on the menu. Eating the majority of a person's daily calories in the evening may lead to an increased risk of developing prediabetes and high blood pressure among Hispanic/Latino individuals, according to preliminary research to be presented in Chicago at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2018, a premier global exchange of the latest advances in cardiovascular science for researchers and clinicians.
The reasons for hemispheric dominance in the brain
The left and the right hemispheres specialise in different tasks.
Standing in for a kidney, MXene materials could give dialysis patients the freedom to move
A type of two-dimensional layered material, created at Drexel University, has emerged as a candidate to assist in replacing the body's waste filtration system in wearable kidneys.
Stanford chemists develop a new way to treat antibiotic-resistant infections
Chemists have modified a common antibiotic to make it more effective at fighting off one common type of antibiotic-resistant bacterium, known as MRSA.
Extracellular vesicles help pass information between cells and onto offspring
New studies reveal that small, membrane-bound particles transported between cells have wide-ranging and long-term effects in the brain and throughout the body, from helping neurons communicate to passing the effects of stress onto the next generation.
From asexuality to heteroflexibility: New openness about intimate relationships
The 21st century has ushered in a ''quiet revolution'' in the diversity of intimate relationships, and a leading scholar says the scale and pace of this social transformation warrants a ''reboot'' of relationship studies.
Complication of broken heart syndrome associated with both short- and long-term risk of death
When patients with broken heart syndrome survive a life-threatening complication that renders the heart suddenly unable to pump enough blood, they remain at greater risk of death for years afterwards, according to research to be presented in Chicago at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2018, a premier global exchange of the latest advances in cardiovascular science for researchers and clinicians.
Magnetic pumping pushes plasma particles to high energies
The solar wind is not a calm summer breeze. Instead, it is a roiling, chaotic mess of turbulence and waves.
NASA sees Tropical Storm Xavier affecting Western Mexico
Visible from NASA's Aqua satellite revealed the extent of Tropical Storm Xavier into western Mexico from its position just off-shore from Mexico's Jalisco state.
Detecting E. coli strains using molecular electronics
Electrical engineers at UC Davis, the University of Washington and TOBB University of Economics and Technology in Ankara, Turkey have adapted a molecular electronic device called a single-molecule break junction to detect RNA from strains of E. coli known for causing illness.
'Dust up' on International Space Station hints at sources of structure
In a lab on Earth, electrically charged dust generally lines up either along the downward pull of gravity or across it.
Despite government claims, orangutan populations have not increased
Leipzig/Brunei. Orangutan populations are still declining rapidly, despite claims by the Indonesian Government that things are looking better for the red apes.
Dana-Farber scientists find new drug targets in aggressive cancers
Scientists have discovered a previously unknown molecular vulnerability in two rare, aggressive, and hard-to-treat types of cancer, and say it may be possible to attack this weakness with targeted drugs.
Taming plasmas: Improving fusion using microwaves
We all know microwaves are good for cooking popcorn, but scientists have recently shown they can also prevent dangerous waves in plasmas and help produce clean, nearly limitless energy with fusion.
How to reduce the impact of shipping vessel noise on fish? Slow them down
One concern with the increase vessel transits in the western Canadian Arctic is how noise pollution can detrimentally affect marine animals.
Overweight kids often left in the dark about their high blood pressure
Pediatricians generally don't address elevated blood pressures in overweight children during well-child visits.
Growing magnetic fields in deep space: Just wiggle the plasma
Astrophysicists have long wondered how cosmic magnetic fields fields are produced, sustained, and magnified.
What can a tau mouse model reveal about the effects of repetitive brain injury?
Researchers have developed a mouse model expressing the human tau protein and subjected it to repeated injury-producing impacts and rotational acceleration to be able to study the effects on social behavior, anxiety, spatial learning and memory, and depressive behavior.
Lead, mercury exposure raises cholesterol levels
Higher levels of lead and other heavy metals detected in the blood was associated with increased levels of lower density lipoprotein (LDL -- bad cholesterol) and total cholesterol, according to preliminary research to be presented in Chicago at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2018, a premier global exchange of the latest advances in cardiovascular science for researchers and clinicians.
Children's sleep not significantly affected by screen time, new study finds
As young people spend an increasing amount of time on electronic devices, the effects of these digital activities has become a prevalent concern among parents, caregivers, and policy-makers.
Abuse and neglect associated with increased cardiovascular disease risk for lesbian and bisexual women
Trauma, including abuse and neglect, is associated with higher cardiovascular disease risk for lesbian and bisexual women, according to preliminary research to be presented in Chicago at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2018, a premier global exchange of the latest advances in cardiovascular science for researchers and clinicians.
Breakthrough for treatment of fibrotic diseases
A drug combination has potential to halt a process responsible for large numbers of deaths.
First-of-its-kind research models immune responses in cellular immunotherapies
In the Cellular Immunotherapy and Transplantation Program at Virginia Commonwealth University Massey Cancer Center, scientists are pursuing a cross-collaborative effort that could potentially change the way cellular immunotherapies such as stem cell transplantation and CAR T-cell therapies are performed.
UCI researchers uncover evidence of restored vision in rats following cell transplant
Researchers from the University of California, Irvine School of Medicine, have discovered that neurons located in the vision centers of the brains of blind rats functioned normally following fetal retina cell transplants, indicating the successful restoration of vision.
If you smoke, now is a very good time to quit
For former smokers it took more than 15 years for cardiovascular disease risk to return to the level of those who never smoked, according to preliminary research to be presented in Chicago at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2018, a premier global exchange of the latest advances in cardiovascular science for researchers and clinicians.
Could climate change trigger the return of eradicated mosquito-related disease?
The largest ever study of the mosquito evolutionary tree, going back 195 million years, suggests that present-day climate change could result in the spread and return of dangerous mosquito-borne diseases to new places or areas where they had previously been eradicated, scientists are warning.
PTSD linked to increased complications and death a year after cardiac arrest
Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms may significantly increase cardiac arrest survivors' risk of major cardiovascular events and death up to a year after the initial medical crisis, according to preliminary research to be presented in Chicago at the American Heart Association's Resuscitation Science Symposium 2018 -- an international conference highlighting the best in cardiovascular resuscitation research.
Researchers identify promising proteins for diagnostic, prognostic use in ALS
Researchers from North Carolina State University have identified proteins that may be useful in both earlier diagnosis of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) and in more accurate disease prognosis.
Physicists designed new antenna for supersensitive magnetometers of a new generation
Scientists from ITMO University and Lebedev Physical Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences proposed a new microwave antenna that creates a uniform magnetic field in large volume.
A stellar achievement: Magnetized space winds in the laboratory
New insights have been gained about stellar winds, streams of high-speed charged particles called plasma that blow through interstellar space.
Children's vaccinations and development checks prevent hospital admissions in childhood
Children who receive nursery vaccinations and development checks are less likely to be admitted to hospital during childhood years.
Opioid gene variant in adolescents reduces reward, may increase later substance abuse risk
Adolescents with a particular variant of an opioid receptor gene have less response in a part of prefrontal cortex that evaluates rewards, compared to those with the other version of the gene, say researchers at Georgetown University Medical Center.
Contrary to government report, orangutans continue to decline
A recent report by the Government of Indonesia claiming an increase in orangutan populations of more than 10 percent from 2015 to 2017 is at odds with many recently published and peer-reviewed scientific studies on the subject, according to a letter in Current Biology on Nov.
Some heart patients ride roller coasters and other thrill-seeking activities despite warnings
Adults with an inherited thickening of the heart muscle, often don't stop participating in thrill-seeking activities despite recommendations that they should.
Is foraging behaviour regulated the same way in humans and worms?
How does our nervous system motivate us to get off the sofa and walk to the fridge, or even to the supermarket, to get food?
Borexino sheds light on solar neutrinos
For more than ten years, the Borexino Detector located 1,400 meters below surface of the Italian Gran Sasso massif has been exploring the interior of our Sun.
WEIRD science
For decades, consensus among psychologists has held that a cluster of five personality traits -- or a slight variation thereof -- universally defines the structure of human personality.
Prejudice against women in power is greater than we think
People are more prejudiced against women leaders than the statistics might indicate.
New efficiency record set for perovskite LEDs
Researchers have set a new efficiency record for LEDs based on perovskite semiconductors, rivalling that of the best organic LEDs (OLEDs).
Small genetic differences turn plants into better teams
Diverse communities of plants and animals typically perform better than monocultures.

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Dolly Parton's America: Neon Moss
Today on Radiolab, we're bringing you the fourth episode of Jad's special series, Dolly Parton's America. In this episode, Jad goes back up the mountain to visit Dolly's actual Tennessee mountain home, where she tells stories about her first trips out of the holler. Back on the mountaintop, standing under the rain by the Little Pigeon River, the trip triggers memories of Jad's first visit to his father's childhood home, and opens the gateway to dizzying stories of music and migration. Support Radiolab today at Radiolab.org/donate.