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Science Current Events and Science News | Brightsurf | November 09, 2018


Scalpel-free surgery enhances quality of life for Parkinson's patients, study finds
A high-tech form of brain surgery that replaces scalpels with sound waves improved quality of life for people with Parkinson's disease that has resisted other forms of treatment, a new study has found.
Cellphone technology developed to detect HIV
Investigators from Brigham and Women's Hospital have designed a portable and affordable mobile diagnostic tool, utilizing a cellphone and nanotechnology, with the ability to detect HIV viruses and monitor its management in resource-limited regions.
Nature-inspired crystal structure predictor
Scientists from Russia found a way of improving the crystal structure prediction algorithms, making the discovery of new compounds multiple times faster.
Ancient human population histories revealed in Central and South America
The first high quality ancient DNA data from Central and South America -- 49 individuals some as old as 11,000 years -- has revealed a major and previously unknown exchanges between populations.
Hurdles to workers' and capital's flow between firms: The roots of sluggish productivity
Since the financial crisis of 2007, with no seeming reason, productivity growth has been slowing down in all the major economies.
Salmonella found to be resistant to different classes of antibiotics
Common bacteria that cause foodborne diseases are resistant to antibiotics used to treat infections, according to research that identified 39 genes responsible for this resistance.
Tiny pacemakers aim to make infant heart surgeries less invasive, while cutting operating costs and time
Rohan Kumthekar, M.D., a cardiology fellow at Children's National, presents a prototype for a miniature pacemaker, about the size of an almond, which aims to make pacemaker procedures for infants less invasive, less painful, and more efficient, measured by shorter surgeries, faster recovery times and reduced medical costs.
Solar power -- largest study to date discovers 25 percent power loss across UK
Regional 'hot spots' account for the power slump and these are more prevalent in the North of England than in the south
Yelp reviews reveal strengths and weaknesses of emergency departments and urgent care
Comparing five- and one-star Yelp reviews, a Penn Medicine research team found what patients consider to be the strengths and weaknesses of hospital emergency departments and urgent care centers.
NASA satellite sees Tropical Cyclone Alcide nearing Madgascar
Tropical Cyclone Alcide continued to linger just northeast of the Island nation of Madagascar in the Southern Indian Ocean when NASA's Aqua satellite passed overhead and captured an image of the storm.
Soy formula feeding during infancy associated with severe menstrual pain in adulthood
New research suggests that infant girls fed soy formula are more likely to develop severe menstrual pain as young adults.
New study points to strategies to reduce maternal death
The number of severe maternal morbidities (SMM) a pregnant woman has is highly linked to her risk of maternal death, according to a new study by researchers at ICES and St.
Psychological science can make your meetings better
Meetings are the bane of office life for many professionals but they don't have to be.
Excessive posting of selfies is associated with increase in narcissism
A new study has established that excessive use of social media, in particular the posting of images and selfies, is associated with a subsequent increase in narcissism by an average of 25 percent.
Nursing science could help reduce firearm violence and its impact
Firearm violence is a significant public health problem worldwide. In the United States, firearms are used to kill almost 100 people daily.
Big data used to predict the future
University of Cordoba researchers are able to improve prediction systems by reducing the quantity of information
Autism is associated with zinc deficiency in early development -- now a study links the two
Autism has been associated with zinc deficiency in infancy. While it is not yet known whether zinc deficiency in early development causes autism, scientists have now found a mechanistic link.
Transmission of antibiotic resistant E. coli mapped in wild giraffe social networks
A team from the University of Minnesota has shown that antibiotic-resistant Escherichia coli bacteria in wild giraffes most likely come from anthropogenic sources, such as local cattle herds and humans.
New flexible, transparent, wearable biopatch, improves cellular observation, drug delivery
Purdue University researchers have developed a new flexible and translucent base for silicon nanoneedle patches to deliver exact doses of biomolecules directly into cells and expand observational opportunities.
Natural climate change has major influence on hydrological cycle over 'China water tower'
Known as the 'China Water Tower', the Sanjiangyuan region is headwaters of the Yellow River, Yangtze River and Lancang-Mekong River.
Scientists solve century-old neuroscience mystery; answers may lead to epilepsy treatment
Scientists at the Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute have solved a 125-year-old mystery of the brain, and, in the process, uncovered a potential treatment for acquired epilepsy.
Researchers study one million years of precipitation to gain new insights into South Asian monsoon
The force of the South Asian Monsoon -- a weather pattern that affects the lives of several billion people -- is more sensitive to warming in the southern hemisphere than scientists previously thought, according to a new study by an international team of climate researchers.
Saliva-based RNA panel distinguishes children on autism spectrum from non-autistic peers
A new saliva-based biomarker panel could improve the ability to accurately identify children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in its earliest stages.
Slow death of nearby galaxy
Astronomers from CSIRO and The Australian National University have witnessed, in the finest detail ever, the slow death of a neighbouring dwarf galaxy, which is gradually losing its power to form stars.
Small populations of normal cells affect immunity in patients with XLP1
Patients with X-linked lymphoproliferative syndrome type 1 (XLP1) are at risk of fatal infectious mononucleosis.
How to produce fluorescent nanoparticles for medical applications in a nuclear reactor
Scientists from IOCB Prague and IMC have developed a revolutionary method for the easy and inexpensive production of irradiated nanodiamonds and other nanomaterials suitable for use in highly sensitive diagnostics of diseases, including various types of cancer.
Sequencing pollen DNA to discover insect migratory routes
Metabarcoding, a technique of mass DNA sequencing, allows for tracing migratory routes of insects, an understudied subject due to technical limitations.
Holocene temperature in the Iberian Peninsula reconstructed studying insect subfossils
Holocene temperature in the Iberian Peninsula reconstructed with chironomid subfossils
A toast to the proteins in dinosaur bones
Burnt toast and dinosaur bones have a common trait, according to a new, Yale-led study.
ESCMID defines generic competencies in antimicrobial prescribing and stewardship
Experts from across Europe have developed a set of competencies in antimicrobial prescribing and stewardship, using a structured consensus procedure.
Nano-scale process may speed arrival of cheaper hi-tech products
Researchers have developed an inexpensive way to make products incorporating nanoparticles -- such as high-performance energy devices or sophisticated diagnostic tests -- which could speed the commercial development of devices, materials and technologies.
Beaches at risk due to the increase in atmospheric CO2
Scientists from the CNR (National Research Council) and Ca' Foscari University of Venice have carried out the first scientific research on the ripple effects linking atmospheric emissions, sea acidification, and coastal erosion.
Alzheimer's and cardiovascular disease share common genetics in some patients
Genetics may predispose some people to both Alzheimer's disease and high levels of blood lipids such as cholesterol, a common feature of cardiovascular disease, according to a new study by an international team of researchers led by scientists at UC San Francisco and Washington University School of Medicine in St.
Hypertonic saline may help babies with cystic fibrosis breathe better
Babies with cystic fibrosis may breathe better by inhaling hypertonic saline, according to a randomized controlled trial conducted in Germany and published in the American Thoracic Society's American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.
Tommorow's population will be larger, heavier and eat more
Food demand is growing at the same time as people are getting bigger.
A two-atom quantum duet
IBS-QNS researchers achieved a major breakthrough in shielding the quantum properties of single atoms on a surface.
NUS study: Mangroves can help countries mitigate their carbon emissions
Geographers from the National University of Singapore have found that coastal vegetation such as mangroves, seagrasses, and salt marshes may be the most effective habitats to mitigate carbon emissions.
Research brief: Farmer adjustments can offset climate change impacts in corn production
U of M research looks closely at the future of maize crop yields with the effects of climate change.
Experts find that stone tools connected communities
Stone tools that were discovered and examined by a group of international experts showed for the first time that various communities that lived during the Middle Stone Age period were widely connected and shared ideas around tool design.
Scientists capture the sound of sunrise on Mars
Academics transform photo of landmark Mars sunrise into a piece of music
Elagolix reduces menstrual bleeding from most common uterine tumors
A new oral drug significantly reduced menstrual bleeding for women with the most common gynecologic tumors in the United States - benign tumors that disproportionately affect African-Americans, an international clinical trial found.
Improving city parks may be one path to help make residents more active
Researchers found that small improvements to a city's ParkScore -- an evaluation of a city's park system -- could lead to more physical exercise for its residents.
A super-ageing community is saving the declining rural Japan, but how it can sustain?
In Japan, rural tourism has been promoted for some time, but has few visible long-term positive effects.
How much debris is lying on glaciers?
A study by scientist Dirk Scherler of the German Research Centre for Geosciences GFZ and two colleagues from Switzerland shows a possibility to detect the extent of debris on mountain glaciers globally and automatically via satellite monitoring.
Mild blast forces cause brain pathology and deficits, despite lack of macroscopic damage
Using a rat model of bTBI, researchers show how even mild exposure to a single blast shock wave is able to induce small but potentially very meaningful pathogenic effects that accumulate with time.
A new path through the looking-glass
Exploring the mystery of the molecular handedness in nature, scientists have proposed a new experimental scheme to create custom-made mirror molecules for analysis.
Intense tests reveal elusive, complex form of common element
Scientists have used high pressure and high temperature experiments to recreate an unusually complex form of nitrogen in the lab for the first time.
The new face of South American people
Study by 72 researchers from eight countries concludes that the Lagoa Santa people are descendants of Clovis culture migrants from North America.
UTA researchers find new pathway to regulate immune response, control diseases
Researchers at The University of Texas at Arlington have found a potential new pathway to regulate immune response and potentially control inflammatory diseases of the central nervous system such as meningitis and sepsis.
Community choirs reduce loneliness and increase interest in life for older adults
An innovative San Francisco program of community choirs for older adults found that singing in a choir reduced loneliness and increased interest in life, but did not improve cognition or physical function, according to a study by researchers at UC San Francisco.
Graphene on the way to superconductivity
Scientists at HZB have found evidence that double layers of graphene have a property that may let them conduct current completely without resistance.
Freshwater turtles navigate using the sun
Blanding's turtle hatchlings need only the sun as their compass to guide them on their way to the nearest wetland -- and a place of safety.
Making wind farms more efficient
With energy demands rising, researchers at Penn State Behrend and the University of Tabriz, Iran, have completed an algorithm -- or approach -- to design more efficient wind farms, helping to generate more revenue for builders and more renewable energy for their customers.
Pollution in cities damaging insects and ecosystems
High levels of pollution found in many of the world's major cities are having negative effects on plants and insects, according to new research from the University of Sheffield.
UMass Amherst study demonstrates 'tunability' of a molecular chaperone
Lila Gierasch, an expert on Hsp70s at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, with her research team, report that Hsp70s from mammalian cells behave quite differently from bacterial Hsp70s.
Possible treatment for rare polio-like illness shows no benefit
Researchers have been searching for possible treatments for the polio-like illness causing paralysis in children, called acute flaccid myelitis.
Adults report distress associated with difficulty controlling sexual feelings, behavior
About 10 percent of men and 7 percent of women reported significant levels of distress and social impairment associated with difficulty controlling their sexual feelings, urges and behaviors.
Plastic microfibers found for first time in wild animals' stool, from S. A. fur seals
For the first time, plastic microfibers have been discovered in wild animals' stool, from South American fur seals.
Fully identified: The pathway of protons
The question how certain algal enzymes accomplish the high proton transfer rate for hydrogen production had in the past been subject to speculation.
Hidden estrogen receptors in the breast epithelium
EPFL scientists have uncovered that next to estrogen receptor positive and negative there are cells with very low amounts of the receptor protein.
Grief linked to sleep disturbances that can be bad for the heart
People who have recently lost a spouse are more likely to have sleep disturbances that exacerbate levels of inflammation in the body, according to new research from Rice University and Northwestern University.
Big change from small player -- Mitochondria alter body metabolism and gene expression
Mitochondria have their own DNA, but the 13 genes in human mitochondria -- along with DNA sequences for tRNAs, rRNAs and some small peptides -- are massively overshadowed by the 20,000 genes in the human nucleus.
Leading researchers call for a ban on widely used insecticides
Public health experts have found there is sufficient evidence that prenatal exposure to widely used insecticides known as organophosphates puts children at risk for neurodevelopmental disorders.
Ready for a close-up: The science behind face massage rollers
Facial massaging using a roller can increase skin blood flow for more than ten minutes after the massage.
Surgical home program for spinal fusion achieves long term success
A standardized care pathway for children with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis undergoing spinal fusion surgery reduces the need for opioid pain medications and shortens hospital stays at Children's National Health System.
Stripping the linchpins from the life-making machine reaffirms its seminal evolution
This experiment had a good chance of crashing. Instead, it delivered whopping evidence to coroborrate the earliest evolution of the translational system, the mechanisms which make life out of our genes.
The whole tooth: New method to find biological sex from a single tooth
A team led by UC Davis researchers have come up with a new way to estimate the biological sex of human skeletal remains based on protein traces from teeth.

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