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Science Current Events and Science News | Brightsurf | November 11, 2018


Phone app effectively identifies potentially fatal heart attacks with near accuracy of medical ECG
Can your smart phone determine if you're having the most serious -- and deadly -- form of heart attack?
Bacterial pneumonia far more dangerous to the heart than viral pneumonia, study finds
Heart complications in patients diagnosed with bacterial pneumonia are more serious than in patients diagnosed with viral pneumonia, according to new research.
Heart failure therapy improves outcomes for patients with acute illness
A drug therapy used for patients with chronic heart failure also improves markers of poor prognosis in individuals who are hospitalized with acute heart failure, new Yale-led research shows.
Researchers find further link between a-fib, brain injury, and possible neurodegeneration
A new study presented at the American Heart Association Scientific Session conference has found that patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) also show signs of asymptomatic brain injury.
2018 California Safety and Wellbeing Survey details firearm ownership in the state
Fourteen percent of California adults, or roughly 4.2 million individuals, personally own firearms.
ANU study casts new light on fishing throughout history
A new study from The Australian National University (ANU) has revealed new insights into ancient fishing throughout history, including what type of fish people were regularly eating as part of their diet.
NUS study explains how a spider and a pitcher plant can benefit from collaboration
Two recent studies by ecologists from the National University of Singapore have shed light on the relationship between the slender pitcher plant and its 'tenant', the crab spider Thomisus nepenthiphilus, providing insights to the little known foraging behaviours of the spider.
Half moons and pinch points: Same physics, different energy
For the first time, physicists present a unified theory explaining two characteristic features of frustrated magnets and why they're often seen together.
Cardiovascular disease, Alzheimer's genetically linked
In the largest genetic study of Alzheimer's disease, researchers at the University of California, San Francisco and Washington University School of Medicine in St.

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