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Science News | Science Current Events | Brightsurf | December 04, 2018


Structure of electrolyte controls battery performance
The research team at the Department of Electrical and Electronic Information Engineering, Toyohashi University of Technology has reported that adding water into electrolyte improves the function of vanadium oxide, which is one of positive electrode material in calcium-ion batteries.
Study estimates proportion of health care professionals not born in US
Health care professionals not born in the United States, including those who are noncitizens, made up a significant proportion of the health care workforce in 2016.
Study shows how mussels handle microplastic fiber pollution
New research shows that mussels readily take in microplastic pollution fibers from the ocean but quickly flush most of them out again, according to a study by researchers from Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Sciences.
How does the precision medicine initiative affect me?
The symposium session at the 2018 Society for Risk Analysis (SRA) Annual Meeting will address cutting edge risk communication, risk assessment and risk management issues with respect to precision medicine, addressing issues such as trust, governance, tort liability and data access and quality.
Social marketing campaigns can help threatened wildlife species recover
Encouraging people to change their behavior through social marketing campaigns can help the recovery of threatened wildlife populations.
Inactivating genes can boost crop genetic diversity
Researchers from CIRAD and INRA recently showed that inactivating a gene, RECQ4, leads to a three-fold increase in recombination in crops such as rice, pea and tomato.
Vaping cannabis produces stronger effects than smoking cannabis for infrequent users
In a small study of infrequent cannabis users, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers have shown that, compared with smoking cannabis, vaping it increased the rate of short-term anxiety, paranoia, memory loss and distraction when doses were the same.
Natural selection in the womb can explain health problems in adulthood
Conditions encountered in the womb can have life-long impact on health.
Gut microbiome differs among ethnicities, researchers find
Changing the gut microbiome to beat illness really does hold great potential, said Vanderbilt University biologist Seth Bordenstein, but first scientists must answer what constitutes a healthy gut microbiome and in whom.
Drug wholesalers drove fentanyl's deadly rise, report concludes
Fentanyl, a powerful synthetic opioid implicated in nearly 29,000 overdose deaths in the United States last year, most likely spread because of heroin and prescription pill shortages, and also because it was cheaper for drug wholesalers than heroin, according to a report on illicit US drug markets by researchers at UC San Francisco.
Mountain splendor? Scientists know where your eyes will look
Using precise brain measurements, Yale researchers predicted how people's eyes move when viewing natural scenes, an advance in understanding the human visual system that can improve a host of artificial intelligence efforts, such as the development of driverless cars.
Think about bees say researchers as Grand-Staircase Escalante National Monument Shrinks
A year ago, President Donald Trump announced his intention to reduce the size of Utah's Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument, which Utah State University researchers say is a hotspot for bee biodiversity.
Promising research shows blood vessel growth key to healthy fat tissue
research led by York University's Faculty of Health shows that inhibiting a protein within blood vessels stimulates new blood vessel growth, resulting in healthier fat tissue (adipose) and lower blood sugar levels.
Exercise may improve kidney function in obesity, reduce risk of renal disease
Aerobic exercise may reduce the risk of diabetes-related kidney disease in some people, according to a new study.
Drug dramatically reduces risk of dangerous blood clots in cancer patients
A large clinical trial published in the New England Journal of Medicine provides the first approach for safely preventing blood clots (venous thromboembolism) in people with cancer.
Single workout can boost metabolism for days
A new study from UT Southwestern Medical Center shows neurons in mice that influence metabolism are active for up to two days after a single workout.
Gene that lets you eat as much as you want holds promise against obesity
It sounds too good to be true, but a novel approach that might allow you to eat as much as you want without gaining weight could be a reality in the near future.
Negative views of flexible working prevalent, especially among men
Flexible working often leads to negative views from other employees, with 1/3 of all UK workers believing those who work flexibly create more work for others, while a similar proportion believe their career will suffer if they use flexible working arrangements, according to new research.
Young black gay men have vastly higher HIV rates yet fewer partners
Young black men who have sex with men are 16 times more likely to have an HIV infection than their white peers, despite being less likely to have unsafe sex, reports a large, new study.
Is the pancreas regeneration debate settled? An original theory renewed
A contentious debate among diabetes researchers has surrounded the regeneration of pancreatic insulin-producing cells: not if these cells regenerate, but rather how.
Study examines med school diversity after accreditation standards introduced
This observational study looked at changes in student makeup by sex, race and ethnicity at US medical schools after an accrediting organization introduced diversity standards in 2009. An analysis of data from 120 medical schools suggests implementation of the diversity standards were associated with increasing percentages of female and black students.
Gene therapy for blood disorders
Delivering gene-regulating material to cells that live deep in our bone marrow and direct the formation of blood cells.
Eliminating microglia prevents heightened immune sensitivity after stress
Using an animal model of chronic stress, researchers at The Ohio State University have shown that the immune cells of the brain, called microglia, hold unique signatures of chronic stress that leave the animal more sensitive to future stressful experiences, evident by increased anxiety and immune responses.
New technique to identify phloem cells aids in the fight against citrus greening
Phloem diseases, including the economically devastating citrus greening, are particularly difficult to study because phloem cells -- essential for plant nutrient transport -- are difficult to access and isolate.
Global review finds consumption of children's antibiotics varies widely
Researchers analyzing the sales of oral antibiotics for children in 70 high- and middle-income countries found that consumption varies widely from country to country with little correlation between countries' wealth and the types of antibiotics.
Story tips from the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, December 2018
ORNL story tips: ORNL solved methane mystery through tree trunk, soil study; neutrons unlock secrets of corn nanoparticles; lithium-ion battery study could inform safer designs; corrosion tests could advance molten salt reactor designs; thought leaders discuss sea of energy change at maritime risk meeting.
No bleeding required: Anemia detection via smartphone
Instead of a blood test, an app uses smartphone photos of someone's fingernails to accurately measure hemoglobin levels.
Immune health in space
With a new crew arriving at the International Space Station, astronauts will be relieved to know that they won't have to worry about a major aspect of their immune system being compromised.
The powerful impact of real-world learning experiences for kids
Real-world learning experiences, like summer camps, can significantly improve children's knowledge in a matter of just days, a new study suggests.
Study finds increased long-term mortality in pediatric firearm injury survivors
Children and adolescents who survive assault, including by firearm, have increased long term mortality compared to those who survive unintentional, nonviolent trauma.
New study shows that fish oil does not increase bleeding risk in surgery patients
A new study published in Circulation showed that fish oil -- which contains the omega-3s EPA and DHA -- did not increase perioperative bleeding in surgery patients.
New cancer immunotherapy approach turns human cells into tiny anti-tumor drug factories
In lab and mouse experiments, UC San Diego School of Medicine researchers developed a method to leverage B cells to manufacture and secrete tumor-suppressing microRNAs.
A missed opportunity
New study shows low use of telehealth services for substance use disorder.
Researchers classify Alzheimer's patients in 6 subgroups
Researchers studying Alzheimer's disease have created an approach to classify patients with Alzheimer's disease, a finding that may open the door for personalized treatments.
Marmoset study gives insights into loss of pleasure in depression
'Anhedonia' (the loss of pleasure) is one of the key symptoms of depression.
Spinal injury throws body clocks off schedule
In the hours and days after a traumatic injury, the gears of circadian clocks fall profoundly out of sync, disrupting body temperature, hormonal rhythms, and immune response, new research shows.
Novel approach improves understanding of the formation of new neurons in the mammalian adult brain
A team of researchers at Baylor College of Medicine, the Texas Heart Institute and Texas Children's Hospital has developed a powerful new approach to understand the formation of new neurons in the mammalian adult brain.
Enhancing our vision of the past
An international group of scientists led by researchers from the University of Bristol have advanced our understanding of how ancient animals saw the world by combining the study of fossils and genetics.
Cleveland Clinic-led study: Rivaroxaban reduced blood clots and related death in cancer patients
Cleveland Clinic medical oncologist and researcher, Alok Khorana, M.D., is the primary investigator on a study that concluded rivaroxaban for venous thromboembolism (VTE), a blood clot in the venous system, significantly reduced VTE and VTE-related death for outpatient, at-risk cancer patients while they were taking the oral blood thinner.
The 'wrong' connective tissue cells signal worse prognosis for breast cancer patients
In certain forms of cancer, connective tissue forms around and within the tumour.
A toxin that travels from stomach to brain may trigger Parkinsonism
Combining low doses of a toxic herbicide with sugar-binding proteins called lectins may trigger Parkinsonism -- symptoms typical of Parkinson's disease like body tremors and slowing of body motions -- after the toxin travels from the stomach to the brain.
SRNL demonstrates electrochemical techniques for monitoring microbial growth
Savannah River National Laboratory, in collaboration with Clemson University, the University of South Carolina and Savannah River Consulting LLC, has demonstrated the use of electrochemical techniques to monitor the growth status and energy levels of microorganisms used in biotechnology industries.
Colombia tropical forest fires spike after 2016 Peace Accords
Fires that contribute to deforestation spiked six-fold in Colombia in the year after an historic 2016 peace agreement ended decades of conflict between FARC guerrilla and government forces, according to a study in Nature Ecology & Evolution.
Immunotherapy pioneers reveal updated efficacy data of tisagenlecleucel CAR T-cell therapy
Physician-scientists from Children's Hospital of Philadelphia presented updated efficacy and safety data on Kymriah (tisagenlecleucel, formerly CTL019) -- the first-ever FDA-approved personalized CAR T-cell gene immunotherapy for aggressive blood cancers, at the 60th American Society of Hematology annual meeting, as well as first-of-its-kind research on overcoming CAR T-cell resistance.
Older women who suffer tooth loss more likely to develop high blood pressure
A study published in the American Journal of Hypertension indicates that postmenopausal women who experience tooth loss are at higher risk of developing high blood pressure.
Discovery of single material that produces white light could boost efficiency of LED bulbs
The equation to make the inorganic compound combines a lead-free double perovskite with sodium.
New catalyst achieves unprecedented activities
Researchers have developed a new efficient catalyst to synthesise aromatic amines, which are central building blocks in many drugs and pesticides.
New graphene-based sensor design could improve food safety
In the US, more than 100 food recalls were issued in 2017 because of contamination from harmful bacteria such as Listeria, Salmonella or E. coli.
Expanded cord blood shows potential for use in adult bone marrow transplants
Umbilical cord blood stem cells that are cultured and expanded outside the body before being used for bone marrow transplant in adult blood cancer patients appear safe and restore blood count recovery faster than standard cord blood.
Neurotechnology provides real-time readouts of where rats think they are
An international team of scientists demonstrates a new neurotechnology for reading out neural signals of position in real-time as rats run a maze, or replay it during sleep, with a high degree of accuracy, with more than 1,000 input channels, and the ability to account for the statistical relevance of the readings almost instantly after they are made.
Oral cancer prognostic signature identified
Discovery based on analysis of tissue and saliva samples from oral cancer patients shows a correlation between a signature comprising three peptides and the presence of lymph node metastasis.
NASA's IMERG measures heavy rainfall in California wildfire areas
Heavy precipitation recently fell in areas of California that were recently devastated by deadly wildfires such as the Camp Fire and the Woolsey fire.
Study reveals dangerous prescribing practices for Idaho patients on opioids
A quarter of chronic opioid users in Idaho were at risk for overdose from unsafe combinations of prescriptions for controlled substances in 2017, according to research presented at the ASHP (American Society for Health-System Pharmacists) 53rd Midyear Clinical Meeting and Exhibition.
What are the cost-effective implants in hip replacement surgery?
New research led by the Hip Implant Prosthesis Study (HIPS) team at the University of Bristol Medical School has shown that small-head (less than 36 mm in diameter) cemented metal-on-plastic hip replacements are the most cost-effective in men and women older than 65 years.
Human environmental effects favor cosmopolitan species over local iconic species
Human habitat modification is favoring the same species everywhere, while unique species are disappearing, finds a study publishing on Dec.
Black Americans' life expectancy decreasing due to firearms
While it is well known that gun deaths are a major public health problem, a new study quantifies the significance of substantially higher gun homicide rates in driving down life expectancy among black Americans.
SWOG shares trio of studies at San Antonio breast cancer symposium
SWOG Cancer Research Network members will share the results of three studies at the San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium, an international gathering of breast cancer physicians and researchers that starts today, with an estimated 7,500 attendees expected from more than 90 countries.
Institute of human virology researchers discover bacterial protein that promotes cancer
The Institute of Human Virology (IHV) at the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM) announced today the discovery that DnaK, a protein of the bacterium mycoplasma, interferes with the mycoplasma-infected cell's ability to respond to and repair DNA damage, a known origin of cancer.
Maternal stress at conception linked to children's stress response at age 11
A new study published in the Journal of Developmental Origins of Health and Disease finds that mothers' stress levels at the moment they conceive their children are linked to the way children respond to life challenges at age 11.
Microplastics found in all sea turtle species
Tests on more than 100 sea turtles -- spanning three oceans and all seven species -- have revealed microplastics in the guts of every single turtle.
Realistic exposure study supports the use of zinc oxide nanoparticle sunscreens
An important new study provides the first direct evidence that intact zinc oxide nanoparticles neither penetrate the human skin barrier nor cause cellular toxicity after repeated application to human volunteers under in-use conditions.
Volcanoes fed by 'mush' reservoirs rather than molten magma chambers
Volcanoes are not fed by molten magma formed in large chambers finds a new study, overturning classic ideas about volcanic eruptions.
More diversity than before
A study by the universities in Konstanz and Glasgow find indications for recovery after ecosystem pollution.
Mathematical model offers new strategies for urban burglary prevention
As with most crime, the highest rates of burglary occur in urban communities.
A universal DNA nano-signature for cancer
Researchers from the University of Queensland's Australian Institute for Bioengineering and Nanotechnology (AIBN) have discovered a unique nano-scaled DNA signature that appears to be common to all cancers.
Protein may slow progression of emphysema, Rutgers study finds
A protein generated as part of our body's immune response to intestinal worms could slow the progression of emphysema, according to a Rutgers study.
Lack of preparedness and insecurity hampered response to cholera epidemic in Yemen
Analysis by researchers at Johns Hopkins Center for Humanitarian Health identifies 20 top recommendations to mitigate future cholera outbreaks in Yemen and other humanitarian emergencies, including call for end of attacks on health, water and sanitation infrastructure.
Money ills add to cancer struggle
One in five cancer patients could be experiencing financial difficulties because of their care needs, according to new research published in the Journal of Cancer Survivorship.
Biologists show inner workings of cellular 'undertaker'
One of a cell's most important responsibilities is to break down and recycle proteins that are no longer needed or endanger the cell.
Mystery of color patterns of reef fish solved
Scientists have solved the mystery of why some closely-related species of an iconic reef fish have vastly different colour patterns, while others look very similar.
PPIs combined with oral anticoagulants reduce risk of gastrointestinal bleeding
A Vanderbilt University Medical Center (VUMC) study published today in JAMA shows that patients already at higher risk for gastrointestinal bleeding gain a marked protection from this risk when they take a proton pump inhibitor (PPI) in combination with an oral anticoagulant.
How becoming a manager can be a double-edged sword
A new study from a Portland State University researcher calls the transition to manager a 'double-edged sword' and found that a manager's ability to mentally detach from work during non-work hours can help reduce the increased exhaustion and work-family conflict that come with the new role.
Diversity efforts drive rise in female and minority medical school students
Medical schools in the United States are accepting more women and minority students a decade after diversity standards were introduced by a national accrediting body.
Ibrutinib plus rituximab superior to standard treatment for patients with chronic leukemia
The results of the E1912 phase 3 clinical trial show that the novel treatment of ibrutinib and rituximab is superior to the historical best treatment, which is chemotherapy.
African maroon resistance at Hispaniola heavily challenged European conquest
In a new study, Robert Schwaller, KU associate professor history, argues that Spanish colonial records reveal that resistance by indigenous and African maroons, who were runaway slaves, not only tested Spanish economic and labor arrangements but also challenged European conquest itself.
Navigation system in rodents akin to ancient, open ocean direction-finding
The navigation system used by rodents is similar to that used by Pacific Islanders in finding their way through the open ocean without a compass, a team of neuroscientists has found.
Flint, Michigan lead crisis should have buried the city in water bottles. So, why didn't it?
The Flint, Michigan lead crisis should have buried the city in waste.
Team converts wet biological waste to diesel-compatible fuel
In a step toward producing renewable engine fuels that are compatible with existing diesel fuel infrastructure, researchers report they can convert wet biowaste, such as swine manure and food scraps, into a fuel that can be blended with diesel and that shares diesel's combustion efficiency and emissions profile.
Smokers who roll their own less inclined to quit
Smokers who roll their own cigarettes are less likely to try quitting smoking, according to a new study carried out by UCL.
Russian scientists developed a new drug for cancer diagnostics and treatment
Russian researchers announced the development of a combined action drug based on ionizing radiation and bacterial toxin.
A step closer to fusion energy
Harnessing nuclear fusion, which powers the sun and stars, to help meet earth's energy needs, is a step closer after researchers showed that using two types of imaging can help them assess the safety and reliability of parts used in a fusion energy device.
Portsmouth researchers make vital contribution to new gravitational wave discoveries
Researchers from the University of Portsmouth have made vital contributions to the observations of four new gravitational waves, which were announced this weekend (Dec.
Study shows low-income women in Texas are not getting contraception after childbirth
The study shows that two-thirds of women did not receive their desired contraception at the six-week postpartum visit, increasing risk of unintended pregnancy.
Researchers demonstrate new building block in quantum computing
Researchers with the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory have demonstrated a new level of control over photons encoded with quantum information.
New possible target for treating major common diseases
There is a large, untapped potential for developing drugs against cancer, fibrosis and cardiovascular diseases by targeting a family of receptors known as Frizzleds, researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden believe.
New Zika vaccine effective in preclinical trials
Researchers at the University of Hawaii medical school have successfully developed a vaccine candidate for the Zika virus, showing that it is effective in protecting both mice and monkeys from the infection.
Spinal cord injury could throw off body's internal clock, study shows
Although paralysis is the most noticeable result of a spinal cord injury, a new study by researchers at The University of Texas at Austin suggests such injuries could throw off the internal clock of the entire body's daily activities, from hormones to sleep-wake schedules.
Scientists consider climate change-resistant crops
Meng Chen and his team identified the genetic mechanism used by all plants as they respond to daylight conditions as well as the ability to sense temperature.
Fasting for lab tests isn't good for patients with diabetes
Fasting before getting your blood drawn for cholesterol tests is common practice, but new research from Michigan State University shows it is a contributing factor of low blood sugar, or hypoglycemia, in patients who take diabetes medications.
Too much or too little sleep linked to increased risk of cardiovascular disease and death
The amount of time you sleep, including daytime naps, is linked to your risk of developing cardiovascular disease and death, according to a study of over 116,000 people in seven regions of the world, published in the European Heart Journal.
Set your teeth on EDGE: World's weirdest sharks and rays on the brink of extinction
Sharks that use a whip-like tail to stun their prey, rays with saws on their faces, and river rays half the length of a bus are among the most unique species at risk of extinction according to the latest ranking from international conservation charity ZSL's (Zoological Society of London) pioneering EDGE of Existence program.
How microbial interactions shape our lives
The interactions that take place between the species of microbes living in the gastrointestinal system often have large and unpredicted effects on health, according to new work from a team led by Carnegie's Will Ludington.
Algae testbed experiment yields data useful for future projects
A unique experiment that explored how well algae grows in specific regions of the United States yielded data that could prove useful as the industry moves forward, according to research from the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and Arizona State University (ASU).
Sex-specific effects of DHEA on bone mineral density and body composition
Women 55 and older have an increased risk of bone and muscle loss but therapy with the hormone Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) may help prevent bone loss and increase muscle mass in older women, according to a new study led by Catherine M.
Developing tools to combat 'fake news'
In order to combat this issue, tools and practices need to be developed to help consumers and journalists filter the information they are constantly being fed.
Mothers whose responses to infants' facial cues increase report stronger bonds with babies
A new study forthcoming in the journal Child Development examined whether pregnancy changes mothers' neural sensitivity to infants' facial cues, and whether such changes affect mother-infant bonding.
Forget 'needle in a haystack'; try finding an invasive species in a lake
When the tiny and invasive spiny water flea began appearing in UW-Madison researchers' nets in 2009, scientists began to wonder how Lake Mendota, one of the most-studied lakes in the world, went from flea-free to infested seemingly overnight, undetected by trained technicians.
Niosomes, efficient DNA delivery vehicles for gene therapy of the central nervous system
In a piece of research conducted in collaboration, the NanoBioCel group of the UPV/EHU's Faculty of Pharmacy, and the University of Elche have designed some niosomes, which are lipid vesicles for use in gene therapies designed to treat diseases of the central nervous system.
'Error Neurons' play role in how brain processes mistakes
New research from Cedars-Sinai has identified neurons that play a role in how people recognize errors they make, a discovery that may have implications for the treatment of conditions including obsessive-compulsive disorder and schizophrenia.
Extent of US lives shortened by gun violence twice as great among blacks as whites
The magnitude of lives shortened by gun violence in the US since the turn of the century has been more than twice as great among black Americans -- particularly those up to the age of 20 -- as it has been among whites, finds research published online in BMJ Evidence Based Medicine.
New Parkinson's disease drug target revealed through study of fatty acids
A new study led by investigators from Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School has provided insights into the role of fatty acids and suggests that inhibiting a specific enzyme can protect against neurotoxicity.
Human actions impact wild salmon's ability to evolve
Once spring-run chinook salmon disappear, they are not likely to re-emerge, indicates genetic analysis of the revered wild fish in a study led by the University of California, Davis.
Toxic chemicals calling: Cell phones as a source of flame retardants
New research by environmental scientists at the University of Toronto suggests that the exterior of mobile phones could be a source of toxic chemicals, or at least an aggregate indicator of the chemicals to which people are exposed on a daily basis.
So cute you could crush it?
Until now, research exploring how and why cute aggression occurs has been the domain of behavioral psychology, said Katherine Stavropoulos, an assistant professor of special education at the University of California, Riverside.
How young women view men affects how they imagine their future selves
When young women believe more men are becoming stay-at-home dads, they are more likely to imagine themselves as the financial providers for their future families.
The Lancet: First baby born via uterus transplant from a deceased donor
Currently, uterus donation is only available for women with family members who are willing to donate.
A bit of a stretch... material that thickens as it's pulled
While examining the capabilities of Liquid Crystal Elastomers, scientists have discovered the first synthetic material that becomes thicker -- at the molecular level -- as it is stretched.
Can guaranteed admissions help reduce college undermatching?
Low-income, highly qualified students are more likely to choose selective universities that match their academic profiles when they know their admission is guaranteed through state automatic admissions policies, according to a new study published online today in Educational Evaluation and Policy Analysis, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Educational Research Association.
New study sheds light on medication administration errors leading to death -- omission is a common cause
Medication administration errors leading to death are common with anticoagulants and antibiotics in particular, according to a new study that analyzed incidents reported in England and Wales.
High lead levels found in some spices purchased abroad
Investigations of lead poisoning cases in New York City (NYC) have found high levels of lead in certain spices purchased abroad, reports a study in the Journal of Public Health Management and Practice, part of a special supplement devoted to Lead Poisoning Prevention.
The distance of microbial competitions shapes their community structures
Researchers at the University of Illinois wanted to know if varying distances of interactions affect the organization of microbial communities.
Microscopic 'sunflowers' for better solar panels
Scientists from Harvard's Wyss Institute have harnessed magnetic fields to control the molecular structure of liquid crystal elastomers and create microscopic three-dimensional polymer shapes that can be programmed to move in any direction in three-dimensional space in response to multiple types of stimuli, including light and heat.
Study counts the high cost of infidelity for swift parrots
Scientists at The Australian National University (ANU) have found a chronic shortage of females in a critically endangered parrot species has led to love triangles, sneaky sex on the side, increased fighting between males and fewer babies.
NASA-NOAA satellite finds Owen fading in the Coral Sea
Tropical Cyclone Owen appeared disorganized on satellite imagery as it moved through the Coral Sea in the Southern Pacific Ocean.
A study describes the dynamics of chromatin during organ and tissue regeneration
The researchers, who conducted the analysis with Drosphila melanogaster, discovered a group of genes involved in regeneration and which are kept in different species.
Men with chronic kidney disease have worse outcomes than women
Researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago have found that men with chronic kidney disease, or CKD, are more likely to experience disease progression and death when compared with women suffering from the same condition.
Yumanity Therapeutics announces publication of paper in Cell Reports
Yumanity Therapeutics, a company focused on discovering transformative therapies to treat neurodegenerative diseases, today announced the publication of study results describing a potential new target for therapeutic intervention in Parkinson's disease and other related disorders.
Understanding the current rise of the far right using Marx and Lacan
The article posits several arguments suggesting that we must turn to thinkers Marx and Lacan and the philosophical concepts they coined to understand the rise of the far right.
Researchers use a virus to speed up modern computers
Researchers have successfully developed a method that could lead to unprecedented advances in computer speed and efficiency.
'Unfinished agenda' in preventing lead poisoning
Over the years, the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) and its partners have made major progress towards reducing lead exposure in the United States.

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