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Science Current Events and Science News | Brightsurf | December 05, 2018


Delaying adjuvant chemo associated with worse outcomes for patients with triple-negative breast cancer
Patients with triple-negative breast cancer who delayed starting adjuvant chemotherapy for more than 30 days after surgery were at significantly higher risk for disease recurrence and death compared with those who started the treatment in the first 30 days after surgery, according to a retrospective study presented at the 2018 San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium.
Cannabis-based compound may reduce seizures in children with epilepsy
Interest has been growing in the use of cannabinoids--the active chemicals in cannabis or marijuana-- for the treatment of epilepsy in children.
Multifunctional dream ceramic matrix composites are born!
Researchers at Osaka University produced composites consisting of alumina (Al2O3) ceramics and titanium (Ti), namely Al2O3/Ti composites.
New research highlights why HIV-infected patients suffer higher rates of cancer
AIDS patients suffer higher rates of cancer because they have fewer T-cells in their bodies to fight disease.
Using drones to simplify film animation
Producing realistic animated film figures is a highly complex technical endeavour.
Analysis estimates mortality from fungal infections of ash trees
The ash dieback epidemic, caused by the fungus Hymenoscyphus fraxineus, has swept across Europe over the past 20 years and caused widespread damage and death in ash tree (Fraxinus excelsior) populations.
Does where students grow up influence where they go to college?
A new Population, Space and Place study explores how the ethnic composition of where students grow up is linked to where they attend university.
Neighborhoods with more green space may mean less heart disease
People who live in neighborhoods with more green spaces may have better blood vessel health and lower levels of stress, and a lower risk of cardiovascular diseases such as heart attacks, strokes and others.
Risk of hospital-treated infections & use of antibiotics after hip fracture surgery
In a Journal of Bone and Mineral Research study that examined trends in the incidence of infections following hip fracture surgery in Denmark, the risk of postoperative infections (at 15, 30, 90, and 365 days) increased between 2005 and 2016.
Turning climate change from a 'tragedy of the commons' to positive action
Climate change must no longer be viewed as a 'tragedy of the commons', researchers say.
New attack could make website security captchas obsolete
Researchers have created new artificial intelligence that could spell the end for one of the most widely used website security systems.
How will addressing climate change affect the job market?
The Paris Agreement's goal to keep global warming below 2°C can be achieved by increasing the use of renewable energy and improving energy efficiency.
Study reveals sleep problems in young adult students
A study published in the Journal of Sleep Research indicates that sleep problems are both prevalent and increasing among students.
Bringing balance to the universe: New theory could explain missing 95 percent of the cosmos
New research could shed light on the 'missing' dark matter and dark energy that make up 95 percent of our universe and yet are wholly invisible to us.
Risk factors for falling are different in older men versus older women
Different factors were associated with falling in men versus women in a study of 3,112 community-dwelling adults aged 60 years and older.
Efficient ternary all-polymer solar cells with PCE up to 9.03 percent
Analogue polymers possess very similar chemical structure and matched energy levels to form the cascade of the co-donors.
Extreme ethnic inequalities in the care system
'White British' children are ten times more likely to be in care than 'Asian Indian' children.
Research examines causes of complications during pregnancy and delivery in adolescents
Pregnancy in adolescence has been linked with increased risks of mortality and life-threatening complications in young mothers and their newborn babies.
Laws designed to ban or curb drivers' use of cell phones are saving motorcyclists' lives
Laws to ban or curb drivers' use of cell phones and other handheld devices have greatly reduced the rate of fatalities for motorcyclists, according to a new study from Florida Atlantic University and the University of Miami.
Seeing the light: Researchers offer solution for efficiency problem of artificial photosynthesis
Hydrogen-powered electronics, travel, and more may be a step closer thanks to the work of a collaborative team of scientists in Japan.
DNA damage leads to genetic diseases and cancer
Scientists revealed how DNA damage influences mutations. Turned out that its contribution to mutagenesis was underestimated and many of the inheritance mutations are caused not by errors in DNA doubling, but by damage to this fragile molecule.
Study solves puzzle of snail and slug feeding preferences
A study led by the University of Plymouth suggests the reason some seedlings are more commonly eaten by slugs and snails may be down to the smells produced by young seedlings in the early stages of their development.
How the brain hears and fears
What does the brain do when things go bump in the night?
Molecular adlayer produced by dissolving water-insoluble nanographene in water
Even though nanographene is insoluble in water and organic solvents, Kumamoto University and Tokyo Institute of Technology researchers have found a way to dissolve it in water.
Fine-tuning renewables could help Texas balance energy resources
A Rice University study analyzes Texas' mix of wind and solar energy resources, and how to achieve better balance between them going forward.
Pollution: New ammonia emission sources detected from space
Researchers from the CNRS and the Université Libre de Bruxelles (ULB) have prepared the first global map of the distribution of atmospheric ammonia (NH3) by analyzing measurements taken by satellites between 2008 and 2016.
Monitoring species: Are we looking long enough?
To conserve species, managers need reliable estimates of their population trends.
UBC economist proposes solution to Vancouver's affordability crisis
New research from UBC Sauder School of Business associate professor Thomas Davidoff could help combat Vancouver's housing affordability problem.
Memory B cells in the lung may be important for more effective influenza vaccinations
Using a mouse model of influenza and experiments that included parabiosis, researchers definitively showed that lung-resident memory B cells establish themselves in the lung soon after influenza infection.
Insufficient nutrition during fetal development may lead to early menopause
Previous studies have demonstrated that fetal malnutrition can lead to adult chronic disorders such as type 2 diabetes and coronary artery disease.
Using graphene to detect ALS, other neurodegenerative diseases
Graphene can determine whether cerebrospinal fluid comes from a person with ALS, MS or from someone without a neurodegenerative disease.
Narcissists less likely to support democracy
New research suggests that people with a narcissistic self-view are more likely to demonstrate lower support for democracy.
Scientists identify 'youth factor' in blood cells that speeds fracture repair
Duke Health researchers previously showed that introducing bone marrow stem cells to a bone injury can expedite healing, but the exact process was unclear.
A microbe's membrane helps it survive extreme environments
Scientists discovered a protein that modifies a microbe's membrane and helps it survive in hot, acidic environments, proving a long-standing hypothesis that these structures have a protective effect.
World's smallest wearable device warns of UV exposure, enables precision phototherapy
The world's smallest wearable, battery-free and virtually indestructible device has been developed to measure exposure to light across multiple wavelengths, from the ultra violet to visible and even infrared parts of the solar spectrum.
On the trail of the Higgs Boson
In a quest to understand the production mechanisms for the Higgs Boson, Silvia Biondi from the National Institute of Nuclear Physics, Bologna, Italy investigated the traces of a rare process, called ttH, in which the Higgs Boson is produced in association with a pair of elementary particles referred to as top quarks.
Widespread decrease in wind energy resources found over the Northern Hemisphere
A new study focusing on the change in wind energy resources and models' simulation ability over the Northern Hemisphere reveals a widespread decline in wind energy resources over the Northern Hemisphere.
Study: Tuberculosis survives by using host system against itself
In a new study published in the Journal of Experimental Medicine, scientists at the University of Notre Dame have discovered that the pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) releases RNA into infected cells.
Reflecting antiferromagnetic arrangements
An x-ray imaging technique could help scientists understand the magnetic structure of promising materials for 'spin'-based electronics.
Learning from mistakes
Caltech scientists identify single neurons in the human brain that catch our mistakes and correct future behavior.
Phase III KATHERINE trial crossed early reporting boundary and met its primary endpoint
Substituting trastuzumab emtansine (T-DM1, Kadcyla) for adjuvant trastuzumab (Herceptin) in patients who had residual disease after receiving neoadjuvant chemotherapy and trastuzumab reduced the risk of developing an invasive recurrence of HER2-positive early-stage breast cancer by 50 percent, according to data from the phase III clinical trial KATHERINE presented at the 2018 San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium.
Women in China have greater treatment rates and control of high blood pressure than men
Women in China have greater awareness, treatment, and control of hypertension than their male counterparts, new research from The George Institute for Global Health at the University of Oxford has found.
Breast cancer patients who take heart drug with trastuzumab have less heart damage
Breast cancer patients who take a heart drug at the same time as trastuzumab have less heart damage, according to a study presented today at EuroEcho-Imaging 2018.
Researchers advance biomass transformation process
Professor WANG Feng from the Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics of the Chinese Academy of Sciences and his colleagues from Peking University recently reported an efficient and novel catalytic method for the conversion of aqueous biomass fermentation broth to a water-immiscible product.
Rethinking the history related to indigenous sites in northeast North America
After radiocarbon dating of plant matter, wood and wood charcoal, scientists estimate that the presumed histories of several key indigenous sites in Canada, as relates to first contact with Europeans, are incorrect by about 50 to 100 years.
Report reveals link between air pollution and increased risk for miscarriage
Air quality has been associated with numerous adverse health outcomes from asthma to pre-term birth.
'Sun in a box' would store renewable energy for the grid
MIT engineers have come up with a conceptual design for a system to store renewable energy, such as solar and wind power, and deliver that energy back into an electric grid on demand.
Increasing crop insurances adoption in developing countries
Farmers in developing countries often rely heavily on their yearly harvest to feed their families.
Strong growth in global CO2 emissions expected for 2018
Global carbon emissions are set to hit an all-time high in 2018.
New drug target discovered for potential blood pressure treatment
Scientists have identified a key player in blood pressure regulation and have shown that switching it off reduces blood pressure in mice, according to new research in eLife.
OU study explores sexuality & gender gaps in political perspectives among college students
Meredith Worthen has published a new study in the journal, Sexuality Research and Social Policy, on sexuality and gender gaps in political perspectives among lesbian, gay, bisexual, mostly heterosexual and heterosexual college students in the southern United States.
Distinguishing resistance from resilience to prolong antibiotic potency
Biomedical engineers at Duke University have experimentally shown that there is more than one flavor of antibiotic resistance.
Duration of infertility in men may affect sperm count
A longer duration of infertility was associated with lower sperm count and other parameters of impaired sperm in a BJU International study of 1644 infertile men.
Greenland ice sheet melt 'off the charts' compared with past four centuries
Surface melting across Greenland's mile-thick ice sheet began increasing in the mid-19th century and then ramped up dramatically during the 20th and early 21st centuries, showing no signs of abating, according to new research published Dec.
Mantle neon illuminates Earth's formation
The Earth formed relatively quickly from the cloud of dust and gas around the Sun, trapping water and gases in the planet's mantle, based on neon isotopes from the depths of the Earth and deep space.
Scientists design way to track steps of cells' development
Scientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have developed a new tool described as a 'flight data recorder' for developing cells, illuminating the paths cells take as they progress from one type to another.
Recycle your old mobile phone to save gorilla populations
Are you among the 400 million people around the world who have relegated an old mobile phone to the top drawer in the past year?
Friend or foe? Brain area that controls social memory also triggers aggression
Columbia scientists have identified a brain region that helps tell an animal when to attack an intruder and when to accept it into its home.
Revolutionary technology pinpoints biopsies to detect prostate cancer
Medical software developed at UCL that overlays tumour information from MRI scans onto ultrasound images can help guide surgeons conducting biopsies and improve prostate cancer detection.
Medullary bone found in Cretaceous birds
A team of scientists led by Jingmai O'Connor from the Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology (IVPP), Chinese Academy of Sciences, reported the first occurrence of medullary bone in Enantiornithes, the dominant clade of birds during the Cretaceous.
A new therapeutic target for metastatic and resistant prostate cancers
Researchers from IDIBELL and ICO showed that the most aggressive prostate tumors generate increasing levels of the NSD2 protein, which are related to tumor progression and therapeutic resistance.
A molecular look at nascent HDL formation
Researchers at Boston University pin down a molecular interaction between an apolipoprotein and a lipid transporter that's key to reverse cholesterol transport.
Wind power vulnerable to climate change in India
The warming of the Indian Ocean, caused by global climate change, may be causing a slow decline in wind power potential in India, according to a new study from the Harvard John A.
Duke-NUS highlights potential role of bioaerosol sampling in disease surveillance
Duke-NUS Medical School pilot study shows that non-invasive bioaerosol sampling and molecular diagnostics can detect respiratory viruses in aerosol samples in public places such as Singapore's MRT trains.
Cell phones without annual plans offer limited help to homeless people
The vast majority of older homeless adults have access to mobile phones, but they are usually basic phones, without annual contracts that let them keep stable numbers, and thus are only practical for one-way communication, according to a UC San Francisco study of how homeless people use mobile and Internet technology.
30 years of experimental evolution results in a new sex chromosome
On Dec. 3, 2018, the laboratory of Professor Axel Meyer, University of Konstanz published new findings of an experimental evolutionary project that ran for 30 years on the genomic mechanisms of sex determination in swordtail fish in the journal Nature Communications.
Type 2 diabetes: A therapeutic avenue is emerging
Restoring the action of insulin is one of the keys to fighting type 2 diabetes.
Information from citizens could improve flood modelling
With increasing floods and flash floods in recent decades, researchers are working to develop improved methods for flood prevention and warning.
Can rice filter water from ag fields?
While it's an important part of our diets, new research shows that rice plants can be used in a different way, too: to clean runoff from farms before it gets into rivers, lakes, and streams.
Soft tissue shows Jurassic ichthyosaur was warm-blooded, had blubber and camouflage
An ancient, dolphin-like marine reptile resembles its distant relative in more than appearance, according to an international team of researchers.
Paving the way for more efficient hydrogen cars
Hydrogen-powered vehicles emit only water vapor from their tailpipes, offering a cleaner alternative to fossil-fuel-based transportation.
Whole-brain imaging of mice during behavior
In a study published in Neuron, Emilie Macé from Botond Roska's group and collaborators demonstrate how functional ultrasound imaging can yield high-resolution, brain-wide activity maps of mice for specific behaviors.
Uranium in mine dust could dissolve in human lungs
New Mexico contains hundreds of historic uranium mines. Although active uranium mining in the state has ceased, rates of cardiovascular and metabolic disease remain high in the population residing close to mines within the Navajo Nation.
Wireless, battery-free sensors monitor skin exposure to solar radiation
Researchers have created wireless, battery-free sensors that can monitor exposure to solar radiation in real time.
New recommendations for the conduct of economic evaluations in osteoporosis
An expert working group has established recommendations for the design and conduct of economic evaluations in osteoporosis, as well as guidance for reporting these evaluations.
Study examines effects of different opioids on driving performance
Taking opioids for the treatment of pain has been associated with increased risks of crashing among drivers, but it is unknown whether this applies to all opioids or pertains to specific opioids only.
Write with heat, cool and then repeat with rewritable paper
Even in this digital age, paper is still everywhere. Often, printed materials get used once and are then discarded, creating waste and potentially pollution.
Are infections associated with increased risk of later mental disorders during childhood, adolescence?
This study used Danish nationwide registries to investigate an association between infections treated since birth and subsequent risk of treated childhood and adolescent mental disorders.
CEASE program increases smoking cessation assistance provided to breastfeeding mothers
A study led by MassGeneral Hospital for Children researchers demonstrates that an MGHfC-developed program designed to help the parents of pediatric patients quit smoking can increase the provision of such assistance to breastfeeding mothers.
Breakthrough in blood vessel engineering
Growing functional blood vessel networks is no easy task. Previously, other groups have made networks that span millimeters in size.
New butterfly named for pioneering 17th-century entomologist Maria Sibylla Merian
More than two centuries before initiatives to increase the number of women in STEM fields, Maria Sibylla Merian was a professional artist and naturalist whose close observations and illustrations were the first to accurately portray the metamorphosis of butterflies and moths and emphasize the intimate relationship between insects and their host plants.
Does weight affect likelihood of experiencing severe flu-like symptoms?
A new Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses study found that adults who are underweight or morbidly obese have an elevated risk of being hospitalized with influenza-like illness due to the flu virus or other respiratory viruses.
Common antidepressant does not aid stroke recovery, study finds
Stroke patients prescribed a common antidepressant show no improvement compared with those given a dummy drug, a study led by the University of Edinburgh has found.
Researchers investigate how vial sizes can be optimized to reduce pharmaceutical wastage
Pharmaceuticals are often dosed according to patient weight or body size which means that a dose must be individually measured.
NUS engineers invent groundbreaking spin-based memory device
A team of international researchers led by engineers from the National University of Singapore (NUS) have invented a new magnetic device which is able to manipulate digital information 20 times more efficiently and with 10 times more stability than commercial spintronic digital memories.
Adjuvant capecitabine did not improve outcomes for patients with early triple-negative breast cancer
Treating patients who had early-stage triple-negative breast cancer with the chemotherapy agent capecitabine after they completed surgery and standard chemotherapy did not significantly improve disease-free or overall survival compared with observation, according to data from the randomized, phase III GEICAM/CIBOMA clinical trial presented at the 2018 San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium.
DF-PGT, now possible through massive sequencing techniques
Researchers at the UAB, in collaboration with the Blood and Tissue Bank of Catalonia, have implemented an innovative and universal strategy, prepared for a simultaneous diagnosis of genetic mutations and chromosomal alterations within embryos obtained by in vitro fertilisation (IVF).
A versatile method for the protection of carbonyl compounds by camphorsulfonic acid
In this paper, camphor sulfonic acid-catalysed protection of various carbonyl compounds is developed.
Effect of religiosity/spirituality on ovarian cancer diagnosis in African American women
An examination of data from a multi-center case-control study of ovarian cancer in African American women found that women who reported higher levels of religiosity/spirituality had increased odds of stage III-IV ovarian cancer at diagnosis.
Adjuvant chemo might not add benefit in breast cancer patients who have excellent response to neoadjuvant chemo
Pathological complete response (pCR) after neoadjuvant (presurgery) chemotherapy was associated with significantly lower recurrence risk and higher overall survival in breast cancer patients, and pCR after neoadjuvant chemotherapy had similar association with improved outcomes among those who received additional chemotherapy following surgery (adjuvant chemotherapy) versus those who did not, according to meta-analyses of data from 52 clinical trials, presented at the 2018 San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium.
UC San Diego researchers develop sensors to detect and measure cancer's ability to spread
University of California San Diego School of Medicine researchers engineered sensors to detect and measure the metastatic potential of single cancer cells.
Study links vitamin D-deficient older adults with greater risk of developing depression
A new study by researchers from The Irish Longitudinal Study on Ageing (TILDA) at Trinity College Dublin has shown for the first time in Ireland that a deficiency in vitamin D was associated with a substantial increased risk of depression (+75%) over a four-year follow up period.
229 new species described by the California Academy of Sciences in 2018
In 2018, researchers at the California Academy of Sciences added 229 new plant and animal species to our family tree, enriching our understanding of Earth's complex web of life and strengthening our ability to make informed conservation decisions.
New insights in rust resistance in wheat
Approximately 88 percent of wheat production is susceptible to yellow rust.
Assessing India's health with a single question
A country can estimate its population's health status by using national survey questionnaires.
Possible alterations in the DNA involved in cancer
The study shows the role of the protein PIF1, capable of undoing different structures in these molecules.
COSINE-100 experiment investigates dark matter mystery
Yale scientists are part of a new international experiment that challenges previous claims about the detection of non-luminous dark matter.
Evolution of the inner ear: Insights from jawless fish
Researchers at the RIKEN Center for Biosystems Dynamics (BDR) and collaborators have described for the first time the development of the hagfish inner ear.
Classifying brain microglia: Which are good and which are bad?
Microglia are important to brain function, and also seem to play a role in disease.
Science: High pressure orders electrons
High-temperature superconductors can transport electrical energy without resistance. Researchers at Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) have carried out high-resolution inelastic x-ray scattering and have found that high uniaxial pressure induces a long-range charge order competing with superconductivity.
Modeling the microbiom
The gut microbiome -- the world of microbes that inhabit the human intestinal tract -- has captured the interest of scientists and clinicians for its critical role in health.
Stress from using electronic health records is linked to physician burnout
Researchers found that health information technology-related stress was most common among primary care doctors.
Technique inspired by dolphin chirps could improve tests of soft materials
MIT engineers have devised a technique that vastly improves on the speed and accuracy of measuring soft materials' properties.
Diabetes drug liraglutide linked to lower risk of cardiovascular events
Real world data from a large Nordic study shows that use of liraglutide, a drug for type 2 diabetes, is associated with a lower risk of myocardial infarction, stroke or cardiovascular death.
Guiding the smart growth of artificial intelligence
A new paper provides a comprehensive look at the development of an ethical framework, code of conduct, and value-based design methodologies for AI researchers and application developers in Europe.
Without Dna2, genes can jump into DNA breaks
When Dna2 is absent, small DNA fragments jump from all over the genome into chromosome breaks.
Adding new channels to the brain remote control
One of the founding fathers of optogenetics - among the most powerful techniques in neuroscience - has created new tools for controlling neurons with light.
Wildfire ash could trap mercury
In the summers of 2017 and 2018, heat waves and drought conditions spawned hundreds of wildfires in the western US and in November, two more devastating wildfires broke out in California, scorching thousands of acres of forest, destroying homes and even claiming lives.
Newly identified T cells could play a role in cancer and other diseases
Researchers from the UCLA Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center and the La Jolla Institute for Immunology have identified a new type of T cell called a phospholipid-reactive T cell that is able to recognize phospholipids, the molecules that help form cells' outer membranes.
Small molecules come into focus
Many biologically important small molecules, like hormones and amino acids, are too small to be measured by conventional detection methods.
Artificial synapses made from nanowires
Scientists from Jülich together with colleagues from Aachen and Turin have produced a memristive element made from nanowires that functions in much the same way as a biological nerve cell.
New PET tracer identified for imaging Tau in Alzheimer's disease patients
Tau tangles in the brain are markers of Alzheimer's disease and are also potential therapy targets.
Dirty air now could harm hearts of offspring later
A parent's exposure to dirty air before conception might spell heart trouble for the next generation, a new animal study suggests.
First observation of a square lattice of merons and antimerons
Scientists have, for the first time, observed a square lattice of merons and antimerons -- tiny magnetic vortices and antivortices that form in a thin plate of the helical magnet Co8Zn9Mn3.
Sea invertebrate sheds light on evolution of human blood, immune systems
Botryllus schlosseri, a marine invertebrate that lives in underwater colonies resembling fuzzy pinheads clinging to rocks, has a blood-forming system with uncanny similarities to that of humans, according to scientists at Stanford University.
Arc welding fume is detrimental to human health
Working as part of an international group of toxicologists scientists of the Far Eastern Federal University (FEFU) have found that harmful nanoparticles are formed in the process of arc welding using the most common types of electrodes today.
Cardiac surgery for patients with persistent opioid use associated with higher rate of complications, increased costs
Persistent use of opioids by patients is a public health concern in the United States but not much is known about the effect of that use on patients undergoing cardiac surgery.
Older women who suffer from tooth loss more likely to develop high blood pressure
Women who experienced loss of all teeth had approximately 20 percent higher risk of developing hypertension during follow-up compared to women who still had natural teeth.
Tailoring the nonlinearity with time domain metasurface for wireless communication
High-efficiency harmonic conversion has been a crucial problem in microwave and optical frequencies.
Global carbon dioxide emissions rise even as coal wanes and renewables boom
Renewable energy capacity has hit record levels and global coal use may have already peaked.
Peace, not war, responsible for deforestation in armed conflict zones
Rates of deforestation in war zones increase dramatically once peace is declared, according to a study from the University of Waterloo.
Infections during childhood increase the risk of mental disorders  
A new study from iPSYCH shows that the infections children contract during their childhood increase the risk of mental disorders during childhood and adolescence.
Atmospheric scientists find causes of firenado in deadly Carr Fire
Atmospheric scientist Neil Lareau at the University of Nevada, Reno has authored a paper in the scientific journal Geophysical Research Letters documenting the rare firenado, finding a number of factors that combined at just the right time and place to catalyze the deadly Carr Fire in Northern California.
Otago researchers discover information about a gene that helps define us as humans
University of Otago researchers have discovered information about a gene that sets primates -- great apes and humans -- apart from other mammals, through the study of a rare developmental brain disorder.

Best Science Podcasts 2018

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2018. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Circular
We're told if the economy is growing, and if we keep producing, that's a good thing. But at what cost? This hour, TED speakers explore circular systems that regenerate and re-use what we already have. Guests include economist Kate Raworth, environmental activist Tristram Stuart, landscape architect Kate Orff, entrepreneur David Katz, and graphic designer Jessi Arrington.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#504 The Art of Logic
How can mathematics help us have better arguments? This week we spend the hour with "The Art of Logic in an Illogical World" author, mathematician Eugenia Cheng, as she makes her case that the logic of mathematics can combine with emotional resonance to allow us to have better debates and arguments. Along the way we learn a lot about rigorous logic using arguments you're probably having every day, while also learning a lot about our own underlying beliefs and assumptions.