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Science Current Events and Science News | Brightsurf | December 09, 2018


How to survive on 'Game of Thrones': Switch allegiances
Characters in the 'Game of Thrones' TV series are more likely to die if they do not switch allegiance, and are male, according to an article published in the open-access journal Injury Epidemiology.
Middle aged men in lyrca on the rise but 'Mamils' confined to weekends, affluent suburb
The number of middle-aged Australian men who cycle on weekends has doubled in recent years, but the rise of the so-called 'Mamils' (middle aged men in lyrca) is confined to men in more affluent suburbs, says research in today's Medical Journal of Australia.
Brexit is leading to higher energy prices
Consumers paid on average £75 more in the year after the EU referendum for gas and electricity, according to research by UCL.
DNA find
A Queensland University of Technology-led collaboration with University of Adelaide reveals that Australia's pint-sized banded hare-wallaby is the closest living relative of the giant short-faced kangaroos which roamed the continent for millions of years, but died out about 40,000 years ago.
Undiplomatic immunity: Mutation causing arterial autoimmune disease revealed
Takayasu arteritis is an autoimmune disease resulting in chronic aortic inflammation leading to aneurysm or aortic regurgitation.

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