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Science Current Events and Science News | Brightsurf | December 14, 2018


New properties of sulfur atom discovered
2019 will be, as proclaimed by the UN, the 'International Year of the Periodic Table of Chemical Elements', in commemoration of the 150th anniversary of its creation.
A young star caught forming like a planet
Astronomers have captured one of the most detailed views of a young star taken to date, and revealed an unexpected companion in orbit around it.
How does diet during pregnancy impact allergies in offspring?
A small percentage of women said they consumed fewer allergens during pregnancy to stave off food allergies in their newborns, according to preliminary research Karen Robbins, M.D., presented during the American College of Asthma Allergy and Immunology 2018 Annual Scientific Meeting.
Foxes in the city: Citizen science helps researchers to study urban wildlife
A team of researchers led by wildlife ecologist Theresa Walter analyzed over 1,100 fox sightings made by the public as part of the citizen science project StadtWildTiere (www.stadtwildtiere.at).
NIH scientists find that breast cancer protection from pregnancy starts decades later
In general, women who have had children have a lower risk of breast cancer compared to women who have never given birth.
RNAIII (RIP) & Deriv. as potential tools for the treatment of S. aureus biofilm infections
S. aureus under the biofilm mode of growth is often related to several nosocomial infections, more frequently associated with indwelling medical devices (catheters, prostheses, portacaths or heart valves).The present paper will provide an overview on the activity and potential applications of RIP as biofilm inhibiting compound, useful in the management of S. aureus biofilm infections.
Can stem cells help a diseased heart heal itself? Researcher achieves important milestone
A team of Rutgers scientists have taken an important step toward the goal of making diseased hearts heal themselves -- a new model that would reduce the need for bypass surgery, heart transplants or artificial pumping devices.
Stress in new mothers causes lasting health risks, depending on race, ethnicity, poverty
African-American women undergo more physical 'wear-and-tear' during the first year after giving birth than Latina and white women, a consequence that may have long-lasting health effects, according to a study of a diverse group of more than 2,400 low-income women.
Birth of a hybrid
Scientists from NUST MISIS and the Merzhanov Institute of Structural Macrokinetics & Materials Science have developed a new method for producing bulk MAX-phases -- layered materials which simultaneously possess the properties of metals and ceramics.
Study shows magnesium optimizes vitamin D status
A randomized trial by Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center researchers indicates that magnesium optimizes vitamin D status, raising it in people with deficient levels and lowering it in people with high levels.
The role of lipid nanoparticles and its surface modification in reaching the brain
Nanomedicine is a field of science that employs materials in the nanometer scale.Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Parkinson's disease (PD) are the most common disorders worldwide, becoming a serious economic burden and public health problem.In this review, we have highlighted the potential of lipid nanoparticles in reaching the brain, a challenging task in modern medicine.
A holiday gift to primary care doctors: Proof of their time crunch
The average primary care doctor needs to work six more hours a day than they already do, in order to make sure their patients get all the preventive and early-detection care they deserve, a new study finds.
Quantum chemical calculations on quantum computers
A new quantum algorithm has been implemented for quantum chemical calculations such as Full-CI on quantum computers without exponential/combinatorial explosion, giving exact solutions of Schroedinger Equations for atoms and molecules, for the first time.
Colorado River Delta report provides restoration road map
Four growing seasons after the engineered spring flood of the Colorado River Delta in March 2014, the delta's birds, plants and groundwater continue to benefit.
Wiring diagram of the brain provides a clearer picture of brain scan data
In a study published today in the journal BRAIN, neuroscientists led by Michael D.
A summary of electrospun nanofibers as drug delivery system
Recently, electrospun polymeric nanofibers have proven to be an interesting strategy for drug delivery systems application.This review presents an overview of the reported drugs loaded into polymeric nanofibers, to be used as drug delivery systems.
Building an AI to predict if you carry a killer on your skin
Machine learning to successfully predict the risk of developing possibly life-threatening infection from the genomic features of a bacterial isolate.
Melbourne geneticists make new discovery about how a baby's sex is determined
Medical researchers at Melbourne's Murdoch Children's Research Institute have made a new discovery about how a baby's sex is determined -- it's not just about the X-Y chromosomes, but involves a 'regulator' that increases or decreases the activity of genes which decide if we become male or female.
Scientists warn of slow progress towards United Nations biodiversity targets
Team praises widespread commitment but calls for broader participation to better protect global marine ecosystems.
Alzheimer peripheral blood: mRNA expression of amyloid precursor protein cleaving enzyme
Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common cause of dementia in elderly populations.
NASA-NOAA's satellite tracks a stronger Tropical Cyclone Owen nearing landfall
Tropical Cyclone Owen continued to strengthen as it moved east through the Gulf of Carpentaria and toward a landfall in western Queensland, Australia.
Self-perception and reality seem to line-up when it comes to judging our own personality
When it comes to personality, it turns out your peers probably think the same way about you as you do about yourself
A painless adhesive
Pulling off a Band-Aid may soon get a lot less painful.
Is early physical therapy associated with less opioid use in patients with musculoskeletal pain?
The use of early physical therapy in a study of nearly 89,000 US adults with musculoskeletal pain of the shoulder, neck, knee and low back was associated with a lower likelihood of subsequent opioid use in an analysis of health insurance claims from 2007 to 2015.
UMN medical school researchers study abnormal blood glucose levels of discharged patients
University of Minnesota Medical School researchers decided to delve into an area where little data currently exists.
A damming trend
Hundreds of dams are being proposed for Mekong River basin in Southeast Asia.
A co-worker's rudeness can affect your sleep -- and your partner's, new PSU study finds
A new study from Portland State University and University of Illinois researchers found workplace incivilities has the potential to not only negatively affect an employee's sleep but their partner's as well
Treatment shown to improve the odds against bone marrow cancer
Hope has emerged for patients with a serious type of bone marrow cancer as new research into a therapeutic drug has revealed improved outcomes and survival rates.
Folate deficiency creates hitherto unknown problems in connection with cell division
Folate deficiency creates more problems in connection with DNA replication than researchers had hitherto assumed, researchers from the University of Copenhagen show in a new study.
Hospitalizations for homeless individuals are on the rise
Data from a new retrospective cohort study suggest a rise in acute hospital use among homeless individuals for mental illness and substance use disorder.
Atmospheric aerosol formation from biogenic vapors is strongly affected by air pollutants
According to a recent study published in the journal Science Advances, air pollution not only affects air quality, but it also changes the pathways along which new particles are formed in the atmosphere.
For these critically endangered marine turtles, climate change could be a knockout blow
Researchers from FSU's Department of Earth, Ocean and Atmospheric Science suggest that projected increases in air temperatures, rainfall inundation and blistering solar radiation could significantly reduce hawksbill hatching success at a selection of major nesting beaches.
Exploring ways to reduce child deaths in low-income countries
In Mozambique, the probability of dying in the first month after hospital discharge is high, particularly for babies under three months of age, shows a study led by ISGlobal.
Levels of gene-expression-regulating enzyme altered in brains of people with schizophrenia
A study using a PET scan tracer developed at the Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging at Massachusetts General Hospital has identified, for the first time, epigenetic differences between the brains of living individuals with schizophrenia and those of unaffected study participants.
Breastfeeding for more than 6 months associated with smaller maternal waist circumference
Breastfeeding for more than 6 months was found to be independently associated with smaller waist circumference in the decade after delivery among women in the POUCHmoms Study.
Correlation of stroke and dementia with death: A study from the Swedish dementia registry
Patients who died of IS the most common type of dementia was vascular dementia while those died from other causes were most often diagnosed with Alzheimer's dementia (AD).
Vitamin E TPGS emulsified vinorelbine bitartrate loaded solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN)
Vinorelbine bitartrate (VRL), a semi synthetic vinca alkaloid approved for breast cancer, has been proven to be beneficial as first line and subsequent therapies.
Low skilled, low paid workers of the world don't unite, research shows
Workers in low-skilled, low paid employment aren't prone to band together and form a common bond, new research has shown.
Characteristics of physicians excluded from public insurance programs
This study examined the characteristics of physicians excluded from Medicare and state public insurance programs for fraud, health care crimes or unlawful prescribing of controlled substances.
Early physical therapy can reduce risk, amount of long-term opioid use, study finds
Patients who underwent physical therapy soon after being diagnosed with pain in the shoulder, neck, low back or knee were approximately 7 to 16 percent less likely to use opioids in the subsequent months, according to a new study by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine and the Duke University School of Medicine.
A role for microRNAs in social behavior
Researchers have uncovered a microRNA cluster that regulates synaptic strength and is involved in the control of social behavior in mammals.
The feature size and functional range of molecular electronic devices
The tunneling leakage is a major quantum obstacle which hinders further miniaturization of electronic devices.
HIV vaccine protects non-human primates from infection
New research shows that an experimental HIV vaccine strategy works in non-human primates.
How complexity science can quickly detect climate record anomalies
When making sense of the massive amount of information packed into an ice core, scientists face a forensic challenge: how best to separate the useful information from the corrupt.
International academic 'Santa survey' shows children stop believing in Father Christmas aged 8
It's that time of year when children look forward to a stocking full of presents -- but the first international academic 'Santa survey' shows many adults also wish they still believed in Father Christmas and some had felt betrayed when they discovered the truth.
Researchers use jiggly Jell-O to make powerful new hydrogen fuel catalyst
A cheap and effective new catalyst developed by researchers at the University of California, Berkeley, can generate hydrogen fuel from water just as efficiently as platinum, currently the best -- but also most expensive -- water-splitting catalyst out there.The catalyst, which is composed of nanometer-thin sheets of metal carbide, is manufactured using a self-assembly process that relies on a surprising ingredient: gelatin, the material that gives Jell-O its jiggle.
Mapping technique to reassess Alzheimer's studies finds improved reproducibility
A neural mapping approach that pegs results from more than two dozen previous Alzheimer's studies found that reproducibility improves when trying to isolate symptoms to a brain network rather than a single area of the brain.
UK general practitioners skeptical that artificial intelligence could replace them
In a UK-wide survey published in the journal PLOS ONE, researchers at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC), and colleagues investigated primary care physicians' views on AI's looming impact on health professions.

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