Nav: Home

Science News | Science Current Events | Brightsurf | December 24, 2018


Sustainable 'plastics' are on the horizon
A new Tel Aviv University study describes a process to make bioplastic polymers that don't require land or fresh water -- resources that are scarce in much of the world.
Regulation of feeding behavior and energy metabolism by galanin-like peptide (GALP)
Galanin-like peptide (GALP) is composed of 60 amino acid residues and its sequence is highly homologous across species.
Researchers use 'blacklist' computing concept as novel way to streamline genetic analysis
Researchers at Mount Sinai have discovered a new use for a long-standing computational concept known as 'blacklisting.' Using blacklisting as a filter to single out genetic variations in patient genomes and exomes that do not cause illness, researchers have successfully streamlined the identification of genetic drivers of disease.
Breast cancer drug impairs brain function
A comprehensive study of monkeys given the breast cancer drug letrozole reveals side effects that impact the brain.
Annals of Internal Medicine embargoed news; Catheter ablation superior to standard drug
A meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials found that catheter ablation was superior to conventional drug therapy alone for patients with atrial fibrillation and heart failure.
Muscle atrophy among critically ill kids occurs within one week of mechanical ventilation
Children with life-threatening respiratory failure who require mechanical ventilation in a pediatric intensive care unit commonly experience rapid muscle atrophy, according to a study published online Dec.
Communication interception can be traced through meteor trails
Meteor burst communication is based on using meteors as cryptography assistants.
Past and present of imaging modalities used for prostate cancer diagnosis
This review illustrates a perspective on prostate cancer imaging summarizing current imaging approaches with a special focus on Prostate Specific Membrane Antigen (PSMA), Bombesin (BN) and Androgen Receptor (AR) targeted imaging using Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and Single Positron Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) based on 99mTc and other radiotracers.
How socioeconomic status shapes developing brains
The relationship between socioeconomic status (SES) and brain anatomy is mostly stable from childhood to early adulthood, according to a longitudinal neuroimaging study of more than 600 healthy young people published in JNeurosci.
New global migration estimates show rates steady since 1990, high return migration
Two University of Washington scientists have unveiled a new statistical method for estimating migration flows between countries.
Pitt-led research describes how neurons could disconnect from each other in Huntington's disease
Newly described mechanism called 'neuritosis' could play an important role in normal brain development, aging and neurodegenerative disease.
Hotter days will boost Chinese residential electric use
A new study from Duke University and Fudan University in China is the first to estimate how much Chinese residential electricity consumption would increase due to climate change.
Brain activity predicts fear of pain
Researchers applied a machine learning technique that could potentially translate patterns of activity in fear-processing brain regions into scores on questionnaires used to assess a patient's fear of pain.
Trees' enemies help tropical forests maintain their biodiversity
Scientists have long struggled to explain how tropical forests can maintain their staggering diversity of trees without having a handful of species take over -- or having many other species die out.

Trending Science News

Current Coronavirus (COVID-19) News

Top Science Podcasts

We have hand picked the top science podcasts of 2020.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Listen Again: The Power Of Spaces
How do spaces shape the human experience? In what ways do our rooms, homes, and buildings give us meaning and purpose? This hour, TED speakers explore the power of the spaces we make and inhabit. Guests include architect Michael Murphy, musician David Byrne, artist Es Devlin, and architect Siamak Hariri.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#576 Science Communication in Creative Places
When you think of science communication, you might think of TED talks or museum talks or video talks, or... people giving lectures. It's a lot of people talking. But there's more to sci comm than that. This week host Bethany Brookshire talks to three people who have looked at science communication in places you might not expect it. We'll speak with Mauna Dasari, a graduate student at Notre Dame, about making mammals into a March Madness match. We'll talk with Sarah Garner, director of the Pathologists Assistant Program at Tulane University School of Medicine, who takes pathology instruction out of...
Now Playing: Radiolab

What If?
There's plenty of speculation about what Donald Trump might do in the wake of the election. Would he dispute the results if he loses? Would he simply refuse to leave office, or even try to use the military to maintain control? Last summer, Rosa Brooks got together a team of experts and political operatives from both sides of the aisle to ask a slightly different question. Rather than arguing about whether he'd do those things, they dug into what exactly would happen if he did. Part war game part choose your own adventure, Rosa's Transition Integrity Project doesn't give us any predictions, and it isn't a referendum on Trump. Instead, it's a deeply illuminating stress test on our laws, our institutions, and on the commitment to democracy written into the constitution. This episode was reported by Bethel Habte, with help from Tracie Hunte, and produced by Bethel Habte. Jeremy Bloom provided original music. Support Radiolab by becoming a member today at Radiolab.org/donate.     You can read The Transition Integrity Project's report here.