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Science News | Science Current Events | Brightsurf | December 27, 2018


Sugar-sweetened beverage pattern linked to higher kidney disease risk
In a study of African-American men and women with normal kidney function, a pattern of higher collective consumption of soda, sweetened fruit drinks, and water was associated with a higher risk of developing kidney disease.
Endothelial regenerative capacity and aging: Influence of diet, exercise and obesity
This review will discuss the effects of advancing age on endothelial health and vascular regenerative capacity, as well as the influence of diet, exercise, and obesity on these cells, the mechanistic links and the subsequent impact on cardiovascular health.
Historical genomes reveal recent changes in genetic health of eastern gorillas
The critically endangered Grauer's gorilla has recently lost genetic diversity and has experienced an increase in harmful mutations.
Breaking down AGEs: Insight into how lifestyle drives ER-positive breast cancer
Consumption of processed foods high in sugar and fat increase levels of advanced glycation end products (AGEs).
Electronics of the future: A new energy-efficient mechanism using the Rashba effect
Scientists at Tokyo Tech proposed new quasi-1D materials for potential spintronic applications, an upcoming technology that exploits the spin of electrons.
How exercise reduces belly fat in humans
Some of you may have made a New Year's resolution to hit the gym to tackle that annoying belly fat.
Bacteria found in ancient Irish soil halts growth of superbugs -- new hope for tackling antibiotic resistance
Researchers analyzing soil from Ireland long thought to have medicinal properties have discovered that it contains a previously unknown strain of bacteria which is effective against four of the top six superbugs that are resistant to antibiotics, including MRSA.
Proportion of cancers associated with excess body weight varies considerably by state
A new study finds an at least 1.5-fold difference in the share of cancers related to obesity between states with the highest and lowest proportions.
A boundary dance of amyloid-β stepping into dementia
Alzheimer's disease is caused by aggregates of amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides.
Impact of a psycho-educational team in early breast cancer patients' coping strategies
The main purpose of the psycho-educational groups was to help women with breast cancer, learn how to cope with the physical, emotional, and lifestyle changes associated with cancer as well as with medical treatments that can be painful and traumatic.
Your brain rewards you twice per meal: When you eat and when food reaches your stomach
We know a good meal can stimulate the release of the feel-good hormone dopamine, and now a study in humans from the Max Planck Institute for Metabolism Research in Germany suggests that dopamine release in the brain occurs at two different times: at the time the food is first ingested and another once the food reaches the stomach.
Researchers discover kidney disease gene affects more populations than previously thought
Researchers at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai have discovered that kidney disease risk variants of the gene APOL1, previously known to affect African and African American populations, are also found at appreciable frequencies in Caribbean and Latin American populations.
Better mouse model built to enable precision-medicine research for Alzheimer's
Incorporating genetic diversity into a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease resulted in greater overlap with the genetic, molecular and clinical features of this pervasive human disease, according to a study funded by the National Institute on Aging (NIA), part of the National Institutes of Health.
Synodos does it again: Breaking barriers to solve the 'impossible' problems
Treatment for low-grade gliomas in patients living with neurofibromatosis type 1 are now one step closer thanks to recent research discoveries initiated and funded by the Children's Tumor Foundation.
Vitamin D intake and obesity in occupational asthma patients and need for supplementation
The research was conducted to assess the vitamin D intake in occupational asthma patients and the relation with body mass index, comorbidities related to vitamin D deficit, lung function and quality of life.
Speed up public health decisions on scabies by skipping full-body exams, study says
For years, the diagnosis of scabies has relied on time-consuming and intrusive full-body examinations.
Long-term memory encoding engram neurons are established by the transcriptional cycling
Long-term memory (LTM) is formed by repetitive training trials with rest intervals and LTM formation requires transcription factors, including CREB and c-Fos.
MIT researchers develop novel 3D printing method for transparent glass
A novel additive manufacturing platform was used for the digital fabrication of transparent glass at industrial scale.
Coenzyme Q10 supplementation on metabolic profiles of patients with chronic kidney disease
This systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were conducted to determine the effects of coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) supplementation on metabolic profiles of patients diagnosed with chronic kidney disease (CKD).
These nine measures reveal how forests are controlled by climate
One of the first studies to examine how climate is influencing functional traits in forest communities on a global scale found evidence of major changes.
Computational advances in the label-free quantification of cancer proteomics data
In this paper, the recent advances and development in the computational perspective of LFQ in cancer proteomics were systematically reviewed and analyzed.
Rerouting nerves during amputation reduces phantom limb pain before it starts
Doctors have found that a surgery to reroute amputated nerves, called targeted muscle reinnervation, or TMR, can reduce or prevent phantom or residual limb pain from ever occurring in amputee patients who receive the procedure at the time of amputation.
Reducing drinking could help with smoking cessation, research finds
New research has found that heavy drinkers who are trying to stop smoking may find that reducing their alcohol use can also help them quit their daily smoking habit.
A tilt of the head facilitates social engagement, researchers say
Every time we look at a face, we take in a flood of information effortlessly: age, gender, race, expression, the direction of our subject's gaze, perhaps even their mood.
Phytochemistry, traditional uses and pharmacological profile of rose hip
The fruit of genus Rosa, known as 'rose hip,' is frequently used in different traditional medicines.
Online mirrors: Video bloggers and viewers share emotions
Examining over 2,000 video blogs, or vlogs on YouTube, researchers from Tilburg University found we mirror the emotions of those we see online and seek out people who share our emotions.
Reliable tropical weather pattern to change in a warming climate
As human activities cause the Earth's temperature to increase, reliable, well-studied weather patterns like the Madden-Julian Oscillation will change too, say researchers at Colorado State University.
Genetic polymorphisms and zinc status
Zinc is an essential component for all living organisms, representing the second most abundant trace element, after iron.
Multicenter trial supports use of topical antibiotics in NICU babies
A team of doctors led by Karen L. Kotloff, M.D., University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM), Center for Vaccine Development and Global Health (CVD), has performed a clinical trial involving multiple hospitals that tested the effectiveness of applying a topical antibiotic known as mupirocin for prevention of Staphylococcus aureus (SA) infection in babies in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU).
Contact with monkeys and apes puts populations at risk
Animal diseases that infect humans are a major threat to human health, and diseases often spillover to humans from nonhuman primates.
The landscape of protein tyrosine phosphatase (Shp2) and cancer
The current study was designed to focus on the allosteric regulation (autoinhibition) of the of Shp2 protein.
FSU researchers unravel mystery of how, when DNA replicates
A team of Florida State University researchers has unlocked a decades old mystery about how a critical cellular process called DNA replication is regulated.
Distinguishing between students who guess and those who know
Measuring the knowledge of students in online courses poses a number of challenges.
Silver nanowires promise more comfortable smart textiles
In a paper to be published in the forthcoming issue in NANO, researchers from the Nanjing University of Posts and Telecommunications have developed a simple, scalable and low-cost capillary-driven self-assembly method to prepare flexible and stretchable conductive fibers that have applications in wearable electronics and smart fabrics.
Hybrid qubits solve key hurdle to quantum computing
Researchers have crafted a new architecture for quantum computing. By constructing a hybrid device made from two different types of qubit -- the fundamental computing element of quantum computers -- they have created a device that can be quickly initialized and read out, and that simultaneously maintains high control fidelity.
Pine needles from Christmas trees could be turned into paint and food sweeteners
Abandoned Christmas trees could be saved from landfill and turned into paint and food sweeteners according to new research by the University of Sheffield.
Sleeping sickness parasite uses multiple metabolic pathways
Parasitic protozoa called trypanosomes synthesize sugars using an unexpected metabolic pathway called gluconeogenesis, according to a study published December 27 in the open-access journal PLOS Pathogens by David Horn of the University of Dundee in the UK, and colleagues.

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