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Science News | Science Current Events | Brightsurf | January 02, 2019


WVU researchers find telemedicine may increase patient satisfaction with medical care
A recent study led by Albeir Mousa, a professor in the West Virginia University School of Medicine, suggests telemedicine may improve patients' satisfaction with their postoperative care as well as their quality of life.
Heart cell defect identified as possible cause of heart failure in pregnancy
A new Tel Aviv University study reveals that one of the possible primary causes of heart failure in pregnant women is a functional heart cell defect.
Quantum chemistry on quantum computers
A new quantum algorithm has been implemented for quantum chemical calculations on quantum computers to predict complex chemical reactions without exponential/combinatorial explosion, giving exact solutions of Schroedinger Equations for chemistry, for the first time.
Surrey AI predicts cancer patients' symptoms
Doctors could get a head start treating cancer thanks to new AI developed at the University of Surrey that is able to predict symptoms and their severity throughout the course of a patient's treatment.
How does the brain learn by talking to itself?
One of the greatest challenges of systems neuroscience is to explain how synaptic connections change to support adaptive behaviours.
NBA teams that come from behind don't garner more overtime wins -- Ben-Gurion U. Research
'People talk about momentum as an indicator for success in business, sports and politics,' says Dr.
Risk of developing depression and anxiety is higher in those with cerebral palsy
Adults with cerebral palsy have a higher risk of developing depression and anxiety than their peers without the condition, a new study in the journal JAMA Neurology reports.
Study sheds light on the function of a long-mysterious PCSK9 mutation
High LDL a leading risk factor for heart disease. Many cholesterol medications lower LDL, some of them by targeting the protein PCSK9.
Mystery of Yemen cholera epidemic solved
The most likely source of the cholera epidemic in Yemen has been discovered by scientists.
No compelling evidence for health benefits of non-sugar sweeteners
There is no compelling evidence to indicate important health benefits of non-sugar sweeteners, and potential harms cannot be ruled out, suggests a review of published studies in The BMJ today.
For first time, researchers can measure insecticide on surface of mosquito nets
Insecticide-infused mosquito netting is in widespread use around the world to limit the spread of mosquito-borne diseases, such as malaria.
Computer model shows how to better control MRSA outbreaks
A research team led by scientists at the Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health report on a new method to help health officials control outbreaks of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, or MRSA, a life-threatening antibiotic-resistant infection often seen in hospitals.
Our social judgments reveal a tension between morals and statistics
People make statistically-informed judgments about who is more likely to hold particular professions even though they criticize others for the same behavior, according to findings published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science.
Work-family conflict hits home
Researchers have long known that sick children can affect a company's bottom line, as employees are distracted or have to take time off to care for their children.
A quarter of all Holocaust victims were murdered during only three months
The majority of deaths during the single largest murder campaign of the Holocaust, called Operation Reinhard, occurred during a single three-month period, a new study reveals.
Is habitat restoration actually killing plants in the California wildlands?
New work by a University of California, Berkeley team shows for the first time just how widespread and deadly the threat of pathogens from restoration nurseries may be to natural forests.
Physicists uncover new competing state of matter in superconducting material
A team of experimentalists at the U.S. Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory and theoreticians at University of Alabama Birmingham discovered a remarkably long-lived new state of matter in an iron pnictide superconductor, which reveals a laser-induced formation of collective behaviors that compete with superconductivity.
Seagrass saves beaches and money
Seagrass beds are so effective in protecting tropical beaches from erosion, that they can reduce the need for regular, expensive beach nourishments that are used now.
University of Nevada, Reno uses 15-years of satellite imagery to study snow's comings and goings
Winter snows in the Sierra Nevada Mountains create the snowpacks that serve as a primary water source for the western U.S.
Study details poverty, lack of health insurance among female health care workers
A study carried out by researchers at Massachusetts General Hospital and the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania finds that low wages and poor benefits leave many female health care workers living below the poverty line.
NIH study implicates hyperactive immune system in aging brain disorders
In a study of fruit flies, NIH scientists suggested that the body's immune system may play a critical role in the damage caused by aging brain disorders.
Medicare's bundled payment experiment for joint replacements shows moderate savings
Medicare's randomized trial of a new bundled payment model for hip and knee replacement surgeries led to $812 in savings per procedure, or a 3.1 percent reduction in costs, when compared with traditional means of paying for care, according to new research from Harvard T.H.
Metabolic syndrome patients need more vitamin C to break cycle of antioxidant depletion
A higher intake of vitamin C is crucial for metabolic syndrome patients trying to halt a potentially deadly cycle of antioxidant disruption and health-related problems, an Oregon State University researcher says.
'Rippling' under pressure
Looking deeper into the internal behavior of layered solids and formations- from graphene sheets, to wood laminates, to geological formations -- researchers at Drexel University are gaining a better understanding of a buckling phenomenon that occurs within the layers of the materials as they are put under pressure.
Trying to quit smoking? New research suggests higher levels of nicotine may help
Allowing smokers to determine their nicotine intake while they are trying to quit is likely to help them kick the habit, according to an early study in 50 people led by Queen Mary University of London.
See invisible into HER catalysis
Chinese scientists makes a big step forward in the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) from water electrolysis!
Long term ag change impacts stream water quality
A new study examines how the switch to conservation tillage has impacted a southwestern Ohio lake over the past decades.
Painful intercourse in women improved with fibromyalgia drug
Women with chronic pain or discomfort around the vulva showed improved sexual function with an oral nerve pain medication used to treat pain caused by a previous herpes infection as well as fibromyalgia, according to a Rutgers study.
Two possible new ways to treat silent seizures in children
A recent study led at the Gladstone Institutes, and published in the journal Cell Reports, characterizes silent seizures in a mouse model of Dravet syndrome and identifies a new brain area that could be targeted to stop them.
Board independence protects firms from corporate misconduct
The more a company's board is independent from management, the less likely it will become entangled in corporate misconduct, according to new findings, from a meta-analysis of 135 studies, published in The Journal of Management.
Radiation doses from CT scans should be more consistent, say experts
Large differences in radiation doses used for CT scans are mainly due to how the scanners are used by medical staff rather than differences in the patients scanned or the machines used, finds a study in The BMJ today.
Meta-analysis highlights important challenges in cognitive processing for adults with ASD
Seaver Autism Center study results contribute to understanding of patterns of cognitive functioning in adults with autism and highlight the importance of a broader approach when studying cognition.
Fewer monarch butterflies are reaching their overwintering destination
The monarch butterfly is currently experiencing dire problems with its migration in eastern North America.
Study identifies genetic mutation responsible for tuberculosis vulnerability
Scientists discovered a genetic variant that greatly increases a person's likelihood of developing tuberculosis.
Familial hypercholesterolemia in children and adolescents: diagnosis and treatment
Familial hypercholesterolemia is a hereditary genetic disorder predisposing in premature atherosclerosis and cardiovascular complications.The main gap of evidence remains the lack of longitudinal follow up studies investigating cardiovascular outcomes, side effects, and effectiveness of treatment starting from childhood.
Engineers, zoologists reveal how gulls 'wing morph' for stable soaring
A unique collaboration between U of T Engineering's aviation expert Professor Philippe Lavoie and UBC zoologists provides new insights into how gulls configure their wing shape -- known as wing morphing -- to stabilize their flight.
'A way cool way to be': Study offers new insights into children with autism
In the first study of its kind, a team of researchers was able to perform functional MRIs of a group of children with autism whose IQs averaged 54.
To head off late-life depression, check your hearing
A new study of elderly Hispanics found that hearing loss increased the risk of depression symptoms.
Lipo-protein apheresis and PCSK9-inhibitors
This review aims to present the role of lipoprotein apheresis in the management of familial hypercholesterolaemia and discuss the potential advantages and disadvantages of its combination with PCSK9 inhibitors.It is quite clear that further investigation on possible direct and/or indirect pleiotropic effects of PCSK9-I on inflammatory molecules is necessary and to be expected.
Tiny, implantable device uses light to treat bladder problems
Neuroscientists and engineers at Washington University School of Medicine in St.
Feisty hummingbirds prioritize fencing over feeding
Hummingbirds are fierce fighters, but also efficient feeders with tongues and bills well adapted to extracting every bit of nectar from a flower.
Controlling neurons with light -- but without wires or batteries
In optogenetics, scientists use light to turn groups of neurons in the brain on or off.
New mouse model reminiscent of Leigh syndrome sheds light on mechanisms of neurodegeneration
Leuven researchers led by professor Bart De Strooper (VIB-KU Leuven) have identified a new role for PARL, a protein that has been linked to Parkinson's disease.
A 'pacemaker' for North African climate
Researchers at MIT have analyzed dust deposited off the coast of west Africa over the last 240,000 years, and found that the Sahara, and North Africa in general, has swung between wet and dry climates every 20,000 years.
Fractures in children often indicate abuse
Physical abuse in children often remains undetected. Atypical fractures may indicate such abuse.
MGHfC study details development of functional skills in persons with Down syndrome
A new study from investigators at MassGeneral Hospital for Children and colleagues in the Netherlands provides important answers for expectant parents who learn their child will be born with Down syndrome.
A catalytic flying carpet
Pitt researchers for the first time apply catalytic chemical reactions to 2D sheets to generate flows that transform these sheets into mobile, 3D objects.
Scavenging molecule provides long-term protection against nerve agents in rodents
For the first time, scientists have created a scavenging molecule that provides long-lasting preventative protection against toxic nerve agents in rodents.
Storage wars
One answer to our greenhouse gas challenges may be right under our feet: Soil scientists Oliver Chadwick of UC Santa Barbara and Marc Kramer of Washington State University have found that minerals in soil can hold on to a significant amount of carbon pulled from the atmosphere.
China's war on particulate air pollution is causing more severe ozone pollution
In China, the rapid reduction of the pollutant PM 2.5 dramatically altered the chemistry of the atmosphere, leading to an increase in harmful ground-level ozone pollution, especially in large cities.
Why the number of single male Magellanic penguins is rising at this breeding colony
Female Magellanic penguins are more likely to die at sea as juveniles, which has caused a skewed sex ratio of nearly three adult males to every female, as well as population decline of more than 40 percent since 1987 at one of their largest breeding colonies -- Punta Tombo in Argentina.
Tackling key questions of Ordovician subdivision and correlation in China
A recent new study reviewed and analyzed the criteria and key remaining issues in the subdivision and correlation of the Ordovician System in China and even in the world.
New findings on genes that drive male-female brain differences, timing of puberty
Columbia University researchers have discovered a group of genes in roundworms that control the onset of puberty and induce sex differences in neural structures that raise new questions of whether differences in male and female behavior are hardwired in our brains.
Sex differences identified in deadly brain tumors
More males get, and die of, the deadly brain cancer glioblastoma than females.
Living a stronger and longer life: What U-M scientists are learning from worms
Research from the University of Michigan Life Sciences Institute has uncovered a cause of declining motor function and increased frailty in tiny aging worms -- and a way to slow it down.
How economic theory and the Netflix Prize could make research funding more efficient
In a paper published Jan. 2 in PLOS Biology, two scientists at the University of Washington and North Carolina State University use the economic theory of contests to illustrate how the competitive grant-application system has made the pursuit of research funding inefficient and unsustainable -- and that alternative methods, such as a partial lottery to award grants, could relieve pressure on professors and free up time for research.
How to better reach men for HIV testing -- a randomized trial on incentives for self-testing
Providing pregnant women with HIV self-testing kits to pass along to their male partners can boost the partners' rate of HIV testing and entry into care, according to a research article published this week in PLOS Medicine by Augustine Choko of the Malawi-Liverpool-Wellcome Clinical Research Program, Malawi, and London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, and colleagues.

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