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Science News | Science Current Events | Brightsurf | January 04, 2019


Adolescents who self-harm more likely to commit violent crime
Young people who self-harm are three times more likely to commit violent crime than those who do not, according to new research from the Center for Child and Family Policy at Duke University.
Nutritional status in adolescent girls
In the current issue of Family Medicine and Community Health, Smitha Malenahalli Chandrashekarappa et al. consider socio-demographic variables that might be contributing to malnutrition in the age group between 16-19 years (late adolescence).
Researchers reveal new mechanism to 'activate' the immune system against cancer
A new mechanism for activating the immune system against cancer cells allows immune cells to detect and destroy cancer cells better than before, and most effectively in lung cancer and melanoma.
Our bodies may cure themselves of diabetes in the future
Our bodies may cure themselves of diabetes in the future.
Eating your veggies, even in space
Travelling to Mars will require astronauts to grow their own food.
Gut microbiome in digestive health: a new frontier in research
Research on the gut microbiome is one of the most promising areas of science today.
Genetic testing does not cause undue worry for breast cancer patients
As genetic testing for breast cancer has become more complex, evaluating a panel of multiple genes, it introduces more uncertainty about the results.
Revised Brazilian forest code may lead to increased legal deforestation in Amazon
Researchers show that up to 15 million hectares of forest risk losing protection owing to a new clause in the law under which state governments can let private landowners protect only 50 percent of their property, down from 80 percent previously, if over 65 percent of the state is protected by conservation units or indigenous reservations.
What does 'dead' mean?
Marking the 50-year legacy of a landmark Harvard report on brain death, a new special report published by The Hastings Center examines lingering questions about the definition of death, implications for organ transplantation, and lessons from the case of Jahi McMath.
Engineers create an inhalable form of messenger RNA
In an advance that could lead to new treatments for lung disease, MIT researchers have now designed an inhalable form of mRNA.
Cognitive impairment risk increased in hypertensive patients with progressive cerebral small vessel disease
Hypertension patients experienced abnormalities in the brain's small vessels that were associated with cognitive impairment, which may be an early sign of dementia.
The long memory of the Pacific Ocean
Cold waters that sank in polar regions hundreds of years ago during the Little Ice Age are still impacting deep Pacific Ocean temperature trends.
Where will the world's next Zika, West Nile or Dengue virus come from?
Scientists from the University of California, Davis, have identified wildlife species that are the most likely to host flaviviruses such as Zika, West Nile, dengue and yellow fever.
Plant hedges to combat near-road pollution exposure
Urban planners should plant hedges, or a combination of trees with hedges -- rather than just relying on roadside trees -- if they are to most effectively reduce pollution exposure from cars in near-road environments, finds a new study from the University of Surrey.
Evaluating surgeon gowning steps for optimal sterile operating room techniques
For surgeons getting ready to enter the operating room (OR), the chances of contamination may be lower if they put their gowns on by themselves -- without the assistance of a surgical technician, according to an experimental study in the Journal of Orthopaedic Trauma.
A new hope in treating neurodegenerative disease
Korean researchers have clarified the fundamentals of coiled toxin protein which causes neurodegenerative brain disorders.
Comprehensive AIDS prevention programs in prisons: A review study
In the current issue of Family Medicine and Community Health (Volume 6, Number 4, 2018; DOI: https://doi.org/10.15212/FMCH.2018.0118: , Somayeh Zare et al. discuss how studies show that suitable design of educational programs can affect prisoners' awareness of AIDS.
BU's service-learning initiative to teach hands-only CPR to high school students is successful
PumpStart, a community service-learning program created by students at Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM), that teaches hands-only CPR to the general public, is effective for both teaching high school students a life-saving skill and providing medical students with an opportunity to engage in public health and medical education.
Stopping cancer from recruiting immune system double agents
Cancerous tumors trick myeloid cells, an important part of the immune system, into perceiving them as a damaged part of the body; the tumors actually put myeloid cells to work helping them grow and metastasize (spread).
Montana State research shows gut microbiome protects against acute arsenic toxicity
Doctoral candidate Michael Coryell's research, published in Nature Communications, shows that the gut microbiome is essential for full protection against acute arsenic poisoning.
Excitons pave the way to more efficient electronics
After developing a method to control exciton flows at room temperature, EPFL scientists have discovered new properties of these quasiparticles that can lead to more energy-efficient electronic devices.
How common are food allergies?
Survey data suggest at least one in 10 US adults are food allergic and nearly one in five believe they have a food allergy.
Fungi cause brain infection and impair memory in mice
Researchers report that the fungus Candida albicans can cross the blood-brain barrier and trigger an inflammatory response that results in the formation of granuloma-type structures and temporary mild memory impairments in mice.
Tiny satellites could be 'guide stars' for huge next-generation telescopes
Researchers design CubeSats with lasers to provide steady reference light for telescopes investigating distant planets.
Recurrent miscarriage linked to faulty sperm
Multiple miscarriages may be linked to the poor quality of a man's sperm, suggests new research.
Study shows the brains of people with schizophrenia-related disorders aren't all the same
A new multi-site brain imaging study in The American Journal of Psychiatry shows that sub-groups of people use their brains differently when imitating emotional faces -- a task that reflects their ability to interact socially.
Predictors of successfully quitting smoking among smokers registered at the quit smoking clinic at a public hospital in northeastern Malaysia
In the current issue of Family Medicine and Community Health, Nur Izzati Mohammad et al. consider how cigarette smoking is one of the risk factors leading to noncommunicable diseases such as cardiovascular and respiratory system diseases and cancer.
Efficiency of community health centers in China during 2013-2015
In the current issue of Family Medicine and Community Health (Volume 6, Number 4, 2018; DOI: https://doi.org/10.15212/FMCH.2018.0119, Lin Zhao et al. evaluate of the efficiency of CHCs in China at the national and regional level.
New nanosatellite system captures better imagery at lower cost
'This is an invention that completely changes the costs of space exploration, astronomy, aerial photography, and more,' says Angika Bulbul, a BGU Ph.D. candidate under the supervision of Prof.
Historical cooling periods are still playing out in the deep Pacific
Researchers from the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution and Harvard University have found that the deep Pacific Ocean lags a few centuries behind in terms of temperature and is still adjusting to the advent of the Little Ice Age.
One in 10 adults in US has food allergy, but nearly 1 in 5 think they do
Over 10 percent of adults in the US -- over 26 million -- are estimated to have food allergy.
A high-performance material at extremely low temperatures: High-entropy alloy
In this paper, the mechanical properties of CoCrFeNi high-entropy alloys were deeply studied.
Factors associated with visit-to-visit variability of blood pressure in hypertensive patients at a Primary Health Care Service, Tabanan, Bali, Indonesia
In the current issue of Family Medicine and Community Health (Volume 6, Number 4, 2018; DOI: https://doi.org/10.15212/FMCH.2018.0124, Gusti Ayu Riska Pertiwi et al. provide an overview of visit-to-visit variability (VVV) in hypertension blood pressure management in a primary health care service setting.
Obsessive compulsive symptoms in youth may a red flag for other psychological issues
Engaging in repetitive and ritualistic behaviors is part of typical child development.
Study examines association between prenatal exposure to antiepileptic drugs and ADHD in children
This study examined whether prenatal exposure to valproate and other antiepileptic drugs was associated with increased risk of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in children.
Holocaust survivors had higher rates of chronic conditions, lower rates of death
Holocaust survivors had higher rates of chronic conditions but lower rates of death than a comparison group of individuals insured by the same healthcare services organization in Israel.
Essential amino acid in humans, methionine, controls cell growth programs
A recent study from the Laxman lab elucidates how a small metabolite and amino acid, methionine, acts as a growth signal for cells, by setting into motion a metabolic program for cell proliferation.

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