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Science Current Events and Science News | Brightsurf | January 17, 2019


Measuring AI's ability to learn is difficult
Organizations looking to benefit from the artificial intelligence (AI) revolution should be cautious about putting all their eggs in one basket, a study from the University of Waterloo has found.
Rutgers scientist identifies gene responsible for spread of prostate cancer
A recent study has found that a specific gene in cancerous prostate tumors indicates when patients are at high-risk for the cancer to spread, suggesting that targeting this gene can help patients live longer.
Researchers identify brain cells likely involved in memories of eating that influence next meal
Brain cells involved in memory play an important role after a meal in reducing future eating behavior, a finding that could be key in understanding and fighting obesity, according to a study led by Georgia State University.
Earth and moon pummeled by more asteroids since the age of dinosaurs, say scientists
The number of asteroids colliding with the Earth and moon has increased by up to three times over the past 290 million years, according to a major new study involving the University of Southampton.
Another piece of Ebola virus puzzle identified
A team of researchers have discovered the interaction between an Ebola virus protein and a protein in human cells that may be an important key to unlocking the pathway of replication of the killer disease in human hosts.
Potential biotech and health applications with new knowledge on bacteria and viruses
University of Otago research to better understand how bacteria and their viruses interact and evolve will enable future studies to exploit the use of bacteria and their viruses for potential biotechnology and health applications.
Antibiotics still routinely prescribed in the ER for infants with viral lung infections
Despite recommendations first issued more than a decade ago, antibiotics are still routinely prescribed in US emergency rooms for infants with bronchiolitis, a common viral lung infection.
Serum prevents deadly cytomegalovirus infection after stem cell transplantation
In a mouse model, researchers have identified a potential pathway towards creating effective treatments for Cytomegalovirus, a common, yet potentially lethal viral infection for stem cell transplant patients.
Orchards in natural habitats draw bee diversity, improve apple production
Apple orchards surrounded by agricultural lands are visited by a less diverse collection of bee species than orchards surrounded by natural habitats, according to a new Cornell University-led study, published in the journal Science.
This computer program makes pharma patents airtight
Routes to making life-saving medications and other pharmaceutical compounds are among the most carefully protected trade secrets in global industry.
Genetic variants implicated in development of schizophrenia
Genetic variants damaging neurotransmitter receptor implicated in development of schizophrenia.
Researchers race against extinction to uncover tree's cancer-fighting properties
As the population of a fir tree in China dwindles, researchers are racing to replicate its cancer-fighting molecules.
Brain's cerebellum found to influence addictive and social behavior
In a study published online today in the journal Science, researchers at Albert Einstein College of Medicine, part of Montefiore, prove for the first time that the brain's cerebellum -- long thought to be mainly involved in coordinating movement -- helps control the brain's reward circuitry.
Salad, soda and socioeconomic status: Mapping a social determinant of health in Seattle
Seattle residents who live in waterfront neighborhoods tend to have healthier diets compared to those who live along Interstate-5 and Aurora Avenue, according to new research on social disparities from the University of Washington School of Public Health.
Wired for obesity
In a multi-center collaboration, scientists at Children's Hospital Los Angeles and University of Cambridge discover a set of genes that help to establish brain connections governing body weight.
Researchers led By Georgia State economist find a global tax on carbon may be feasible
There is a consistently high level of public support across nations for a global carbon tax if the tax policy is carefully designed, according to a survey of people in the United States, India, the United Kingdom, South Africa and Australia.
Stress fracture? Your foot hitting pavement wasn't the main problem
A segment of the multibillion-dollar wearables industry aims to save potential victims from this fate, but a Vanderbilt University engineering professor found a major problem: the devices are measuring the wrong thing.
Engineered immune cells target broad range of pediatric solid tumors in mice
Immune cells engineered to attack childhood cancers were able to eradicate different types of pediatric tumors in mice, according to a new study from the Stanford University School of Medicine.
Size matters -- To livebearer fish, big fins are a big deal
In a new paper, biologists from the University of California, Riverside, studied the evolution of 40 molly and Limia species, and concluded dorsal fin displays arose first for males to compete with other males, only later being used in courtship displays to females.
UCLA scientists create a renewable source of cancer-fighting T cells
A study by UCLA researchers is the first to demonstrate a technique for coaxing pluripotent stem cells -- which can give rise to every cell type in the body and which can be grown indefinitely in the lab -- into becoming mature T cells capable of killing tumor cells.
Additive manufacturing reflects fundamental metallurgical principles to create materials
University of Sheffield has been taking a novel approach to the development of engineering components produced using additive manufacturing.
DNA analyses show a dynamic coevolutionary relationship between birds and their feather mites
A genetic study uncovers that birds maintain a dynamic coevolutionary relationship with their feather mites.
Findings on eye-signal blending re-examines Nobel-winning research
Knowing precisely where the signals meet and the brain processes them is vital to treating amblyopia, or reduced vision in one eye because the brain and eye aren't working together properly.
BU: US youth suicides more prevalent in states with higher gun ownership
A new study led by Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) researchers finds that states with higher levels of household gun ownership also have higher overall youth suicide rates, with every 10 percentage-point increase in household gun ownership associated with a 26.9 percent increase in the youth suicide rate.
Psychological distress is a risk factor for dementia
A new study suggests that vital exhaustion -- which can be perceived as an indicator of psychological distress -- is a risk factor for future risk of dementia.
Higher suicide rates evident among youth certain groups of Medicaid enrollees
According to a new study published in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine, nearly four in ten of all youth who died by suicide in 16 states between 2009 and 2013 were Medicaid enrollees.
Cultivating 4D tissues -- the self-curving cornea
Scientists at Newcastle University have developed a biological system which lets cells form a desired shape by molding their surrounding material -- in the first instance creating a self-curving cornea.
SwRI scientists study moon craters to understand Earth's impact history
Using images and thermal data collected by NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO), Southwest Research Institute scientists and their collaborators have calculated the ages of large lunar craters across the moon to be less than 1 billion years.
Advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck: Pembrolizumab prolongs survival
quamous cell carcinoma is one of the most common cancers of the skin and mucosa.
How molecules teeter in a laser field
When molecules interact with the oscillating field of a laser, an instantaneous, time-dependent dipole is induced.
Erucic acid
Erucic acid occurs in vegetable oils and fats. It is a natural component of plant seeds of the Brassicaceae family (crucifers such as rape and mustard).
Can a critic-turned-believer sway others? The case of genetically modified foods
When an advocate for one side of an issue announces that he or she now believes the opposite, can that message affect others' views?
New study identifies specific obesity-related risk factors for kidney cancer
A new study confirms the long-suspected role of obesity as a risk factor for developing renal cell carcinoma (RCC), a type of kidney cancer, and identifies several specific obesity-related factors.
Telling stories using rhythmic gesture helps children improve their oral skills
For the first time it has been shown that a brief training session with rhythmic gestures has immediate benefits for narrative discourse in children of 5 and 6 years of age in a study published recently in Developmental Psychology led by Pilar Prieto, ICREA research professor and coordinator of the Prosodic Studies Group and of the Department of Translation and Language Sciences, together with her collaborators, Ingrid Vilà-Giménez and Alfonso Igualada (Cognition and Language Research Group, Open University of Catalonia).
Many hepatitis infections go undiagnosed in cancer patients
Results from the largest study of hepatitis B and C and HIV infection prevalence in cancer patients show an alarmingly high rate of undiagnosed acute and chronic hepatitis B and C.
2017 Women's March solidarity events drew 100 times national protest average, study shows
Based on a survey of sister marches across the United States, key characteristics of the events were massive turnout, majority female leadership, low rate of counterdemonstrators, substantial grassroots mobilization and strong support from faith-based groups.
Penguins, starfish, whales: Which animals will win and lose in a warming Antarctic?
Using risk assessments, like those used for setting occupational safety limits in the workplace, researchers determined the winners and losers of climate change in the Antarctic.
Russian scientists creating new tools for diagnosing cancer
A group of scientists from Russia's Ural Federal University, headed by Professor Grigory Zyryanov, synthesized a group of multi-purpose fluorophores.
Three-day imaging captures hi-res, cinematic view of fly brain
Fluorescent tagging of cellular proteins has allowed unprecedentedly detailed images of brain circuits, but imaging neurons and synapses over large areas in fine detail is difficult.
Unraveling of 58-year-old corn gene mystery may have plant-breeding implications
In discovering a mutant gene that 'turns on' another gene responsible for the red pigments sometimes seen in corn, researchers solved an almost six-decades-old mystery with a finding that may have implications for plant breeding in the future.
Fruit fly promiscuity alters the evolutionary forces on males
Researchers in the Department of Zoology at Oxford University have demonstrated for the first time what effect female fruit flies having multiple partners has on sexual selection -- before and after mating.
Poor sleep and heart-related death
Elderly men who experience extended episodes of interrupted breathing while asleep have a high risk of heart problems.
Individual lichens can have up to three fungi, study shows
Individual lichens may contain up to three different fungi, according to new research from an international team of researchers.
Reinforcement learning expedites 'tuning' of robotic prosthetics
Researchers have developed an intelligent system for 'tuning' powered prosthetic knees, allowing patients to walk comfortably with the prosthetic device in minutes, rather than the hours necessary if the device is tuned by a trained clinical practitioner.
Global change could also affect hake fisheries in Tierra del Fuego
A new scientific study suggests snoek (Thyrsites atun) can recolonize the marine area of the Beagle Channel and South-Western Atlantic waters, an area in the American continent where this species competed with the hake (Merluccius sp.) to hunt preys in warmer periods.
A study shows an increase of permafrost temperature at a global scale
Permafrost, is an element of the cryosphere which has not been as much studied as other soils like glaciers or marine ice.
New combination blood test for pancreatic cancer may catch disease earlier
A new approach to pancreatic cancer screening may help doctors detect the disease in people at high risk before it reaches more advanced and difficult-to treat stages.
Scientists from TU Dresden search for new methods to cure neurodegenerative diseases
Behavioural experiments confirm: Additional neurons improve brain function.
Scientists find increase in asteroid impacts on ancient Earth by studying the Moon
A team of scientists has determined the number of asteroid impacts on the Moon and Earth increased by two to three times starting around 290 million years ago.
Ultraviolet disinfection 97.7 percent effective in eliminating pathogens in hospital settings
Using ultraviolet (UV) disinfection technology to reduce the risk of hospital-acquired infections eliminated up to 97.7 percent.
Measurements of Saturn's gravitational field show its rings are younger than the planet
Using data from the Cassini spacecraft's final orbits, scientists report new measurements of the gravitational field around Saturn and its rings, which allowed them to constrain its internal structure, the depth of its winds, and the mass and age of its rings.
Mapping the neural circuit of innate responses to odors
Animal responses to odors can be learned or innate. The innate capacity to discern between an appetizing and a foul -- i.e., dangerous -- odor is essential, from the start, to guide behavior for survival.
How the human brain works during simultaneous interpretation
Researchers at the Centre for Bioelectric Interfaces and the Centre for Cognition & Decision Making of the Higher School of Economics utilized electroencephalogram (EEG) and the event-related potential (ERP) technique to study neural activity during simultaneous interpretation of continuous prose.
How to rapidly image entire brains at nanoscale resolution
A powerful new technique combines expansion microscopy with lattice light-sheet microscopy for nanoscale imaging of fly and mouse neuronal circuits and their molecular constituents that's roughly 1,000 times faster than other methods.
New findings reveal surprising role of the cerebellum in reward and social behaviors
A study in rodents found that the brain's cerebellum -- known to play a role in motor coordination -- also helps control the brain's reward circuitry.
Resist! TAK1 enables endothelial cells to avoid apoptosis
TNFα-induced cell death is tightly regulated and resisted in endothelial cells.
How our cellular antennas are formed
Most of our cells contain an immobile primary cilium. The 'skeleton' of the cilium consists of microtubule doublets, which are 'pairs' of proteins essential for their formation and function.
Gene therapy blocks peripheral nerve damage in mice
Scientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have developed a gene therapy that blocks axonal degeneration, preventing axon destruction in mice and suggesting a therapeutic strategy that could help prevent the loss of peripheral nerves in multiple conditions.
Fighting deadly drug resistant bacteria in intestines with new antibiotic
Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is a potentially deadly infection in the large intestine most common in people who need to take antibiotics for a long period of time, particularly in Australia's ageing population.
Killer blows? Knockout study of pair of mouse MicroRNA provides cancer insight
Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU) researchers used knockout mouse models created by gene editing to reveal that the miRNA miR-146b, like miR-146a, is involved in the development of cancers, with them having similar but not identical effects.
Brain vital signs capture undetected impairments in ice hockey players with concussions
A team of brain researchers have published results from a multi-year hockey concussion study, which tracked young Junior A male ice hockey players using a new brainwave monitoring method called 'brain vital signs.' The study showed that 'brain vital signs' -- a breakthrough for analyzing complex brainwave data to provide a simple and objective physiological evaluation of brain function -- is more sensitive in detecting brain function changes related to concussion than existing clinical tests.
Whole genome sequencing method may speed personalized treatment of drug-resistant infections
Researchers at Johns Hopkins Medicine say they have added to evidence that rapid resistance gene sequencing technology can accurately speed the identification of specific antibiotic-resistant bacteria strains that sicken and kill some patients.
New thermoelectric material delivers record performance
Taking advantage of recent advances in using theoretical calculations to predict the properties of new materials, researchers reported Thursday the discovery of a new class of half-Heusler thermoelectric compounds, including one with a record high figure of merit -- a metric used to determine how efficiently a thermoelectric material can convert heat to electricity.
Understanding our early human ancestors: Australopithecus sediba
Following the 2008 discovery of Malapa in the Cradle of Humankind, South Africa by Lee Berger of the University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, where two of the most complete skeletons of early human ancestors were found, a new hominin species, 'Australopithecus sediba (Au. sediba),' was named.
Observations of nearby supernova and associated jet cocoon provide new insights on gamma-ray bursts
An international team of researchers including Chryssa Kouveliotou, a professor of physics at the George Washington University, discovered the missing link connecting hypernovae to GRBs in the form of a hot cocoon around the jets of matter expelled by the central engine as these spread through the outer layers of the progenitor star.
Addressing expected challenges after resumption of HPV vaccination
Researchers at Osaka University present measures for reducing a risk of uterine cervical cancer that increased by the suspension of the Japanese government recommendation for the Human Papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination and for promoting HPV vaccination after its resumption
Study finds dangerous increases in patients mixing opioids, benzodiazepines or Z-drugs
The number of Americans taking a dangerous combination of both opioids and benzodiazepines -- a group of drugs commonly prescribed for pain, insomnia and anxiety -- increased by 250 percent over a 15-year period, while there was an 850 percent increase in patients taking benzodiazepines and so-called Z-drugs, according to a new study published in the journal Sleep.
Two tiny beetle fossils offer evolution and biogeography clues
Recently, an international team led by Dr. CAI Chenyang, from the Nanjing Institute of Geology and Palaeontology of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, reported two new and rare species of the extant family Clambidae from Burmese amber: Acalyptomerus thayerae Cai and Lawrence, 2019, and Sphaerothorax uenoi Cai and Lawrence, 2019.
Scientists accidentally engineer mice with unusually short and long tails
Researchers from two groups studying mouse development have accidentally created mice with unusually long and unusually short tails.
New scale for electronegativity rewrites the chemistry textbook
Electronegativity is one of the most well-known models for explaining why chemical reactions occur.
Investigation evaluates effects of environmental exposures on neurologic disorders
New systematic approach keys in on environmental mechanisms that contribute to central nervous system inflammation, identifies herbicide linuron as inflammation activator
Combination therapy treats leishmaniasis, HIV patients
Coinfection with visceral leishmaniasis (VL) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) has been observed in at least 35 countries on four continents and requires special case management.
World Trade Center responders at increased risk for head and neck cancers
A Rutgers study has found a significant increase in head and neck cancers among workers and volunteers who responded to the 9/11 terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center (WTC), pointing to newly emerging risks that require ongoing monitoring and treatment of those who were exposed during the initial response.
Epigenetics contribute to male and female differences in fear memory
In a mouse model of traumatic memory, male mice recall fear-related memories better than female mice, according to a study in Biological Psychiatry.
Models of life
Friedrich Simmel und Aurore Dupin, researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM), have for the first time created artificial cell assemblies that can communicate with each other.
More animal species under threat of extinction, new method shows
Currently approximately 600 species might be inaccurately assessed as non-threatened on the Red List of Threatened Species.
Emperor penguins' first journey to sea
New research by the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) and colleagues reveals the previously unknown behaviors of juvenile Emperor penguins in their critical early months when they leave their birth colony and first learn how to swim, dive, and find food.
Stanford researchers discover the brain cells that make pain unpleasant
If you step on a tack, neurons in your brain will register two things: that there's a piercing physical sensation in your foot, and that it's not pleasant.
Fever boots immune cell trafficking through a thermal sensory Hsp90-α4 integrin pathway
Recently, researchers at the Shanghai Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, in collaboration with colleagues, demonstrated that fever promotes T lymphocyte trafficking through heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90)-induced α4 integrin activation and signaling in T cells.
A new way to transfer energy between cells
Researchers have described a new method for the transmission of electrons between proteins that refutes the evidence from experiments until now.
Population study finds striking disparities in health behaviors and screening in Indiana
A population health study from IUPUI and Regenstrief Institute has identified striking socioeconomic and racial disparities in health behavior and in the receipt of cancer screening in the 34 Indiana counties with cancer death rates higher than the state's average.
Awareness is barrier to 'plastic-free periods'
New research indicates that more needs to be done to raise awareness of the amount of plastic contained in commonly-used menstrual products.
Saturn hasn't always had rings
In its last days, the Cassini spacecraft looped between Saturn and its rings so that Earth-based radio telescopes could track the gravitational tug of each.
Bioethicists call for oversight of consumer 'neurotechnologies' with unproven benefits
The marketing of consumer 'neurotechnologies' can be enticing: apps that diagnose a mental state, and brain devices that improve cognition or 'read' one's emotional state.
Molecular machinery that makes potent antibiotic revealed after decades of research
Scientists at Rutgers and universities in Russia, Poland and England have solved a nearly 30-year mystery -- how the molecular machinery works in an enzyme that makes a potent antibiotic.
Air pollution increases ER visits for breathing problems
As levels of ozone and fine particulate pollution (PM2.5) rise, more patients end up in the ER with breathing problems, according to the largest US study of air pollution and respiratory emergency room visits of patients of all ages.
Right on target: Light hybrid molecule stop tumor growth in mice
A team of scientists from the National University of Science and Technology 'MISIS', the Moscow Technological University (MIREA) and the Pirogov Russian National Research Medical University has experimentally proved the effectiveness of the formerly suggested 'light' method in oncotherapy.
New hope for stem cell approach to treating diabetes
Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have tweaked the recipe for coaxing human stem cells into insulin-secreting beta cells and shown that the resulting cells are more responsive to fluctuating glucose levels in the blood
Scientists generate high-quality human vascular cells through genome editing technology
Scientists from the Institute of Biophysics of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Peking University and the Institute of Zoology of CAS have generated the world's first genetically enhanced human vascular cells by targeting a single longevity gene, FOXO3.
Queen's University researchers develop new test to detect disease and infection
Researchers at Queen's University Belfast have developed a highly innovative new enzyme biomarker test that has the potential to indicate diseases and bacterial contamination saving time, money and possibly lives.
Researchers map out the relationship between mental disorders
Based on register data from 5.9 million people living in Denmark from 2000 to 2016, the study is the most detailed study of comorbidity ever conducted in the field of mental health.
Study highlights lack of fair access to urban green spaces
People with higher incomes and more education tend to have greater access to urban green spaces than their less privileged neighbors, a new University of British Columbia study of parks and greenery in 10 major North American cities has found.
Bee surveys in newest US national park could aid pollinator studies elsewhere
Declines in native bee populations are widely reported, but can existing data really analyze these trends?
New light shed on intensely studied material
The organic polymer PEDOT is probably one of the world's most intensely studied materials.
New blood tests for TB could accelerate diagnosis and save the NHS money
Rapid blood tests used by the NHS are unable to rule out tuberculosis (TB) and should be replaced with a new, more accurate test, a study has found.
The cerebellum's hidden roles in social and reward-driven behavior
The cerebellum may regulate sociability and reward-driven behavior by controlling the release of dopamine, according to a new study.
Scientists learn how common virus reactivates after transplantation
A new study in Science challenges long-held theories of why a common virus -- cytomegalovirus, or CMV -- can reactivate and become a life-threatening infection in people with a compromised immune system, including blood cancer patients undergoing bone marrow transplantation.
Financial stress linked to heart disease risk among African Americans
African Americans who experienced moderate to high financial stress had an increased risk of developing heart disease compared to those who did not report such stress, according to a longitudinal study performed by researchers from Brigham and Women's Hospital.
New survey identifies the social influences in people attending A&E
A survey of 20 disadvantaged neighborhoods across the North West (UK) has revealed the social influences on why people attend their local Accident & Emergency department.
Discovery of enhanced bone growth could lead to new treatments for osteoporosis
UCLA and UC San Francisco biologists have discovered a dramatic pattern of bone growth in female mice -- research that could potentially lead to stronger bone density in women and new treatments for osteoporosis in older women.
First clinical study shows mavoglurant improves eye gaze behavior in fragile X syndrome patients
Researchers at Rush University Medical Center and the MIND Institute at UC Davis have found that mavoglurant, an experimental drug known as an mGluR5 negative modulator, can positively modify a key characteristic behavior in individuals with fragile X syndrome (FXS).
The Lancet Neurology: Frailty could make people more susceptible to dementia
New research published in The Lancet Neurology journal suggests that frailty makes older adults more susceptible to Alzheimer's dementia, and moderates the effects of dementia-related brain changes on dementia symptoms.
Pressure induced lifshitz transition in the type II Dirac semimetal PtTe2
A recent high pressure study on the type II Dirac Semimetal (DSM) PtTe2 reveals a pressure induced Lifshitz transition in the trivial band structure, while the crystal structure keeps robust under pressure.
Local focus could help tackle global problems
People's love for their local areas could be harnessed to tackle global environmental problems, researchers say.
In the apple orchards: A new way to gauge bee pollinator success
A decade-long analysis of bee activity in apple orchards in New York showed decreased pollination services in some orchards beyond what simple counts of bee number or species richness would predict.
Soft drinks + hard work + hot weather = possible kidney disease risk
New research suggests that drinking sugary, caffeinated soft drinks while exercising in hot weather may increase the risk of kidney disease.
Molecules of GM food can accumulate in human digestive tract and enter cells of body
An international group of toxicologists, which includes scientists from Far Eastern Federal University (FEFU), continues to study the potential risks of genetically modified (GM) products.
Millions of Americans exposed to elevated nitrate levels in drinking water
More than 5.6 million Americans are exposed to nitrate in drinking water at levels that could cause health problems.
Automated text messages improve outcomes after joint replacement surgery
An automated text messaging system increases patient engagement with home-based exercise and promotes faster recovery after total knee or hip replacement surgery, reports a study in the Jan.
Nanoparticle breakthrough in the fight against cancer
A recent study, affiliated with South Korea's Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST) has introduced a novel targeted drug delivery system in the fight against cancer.
New risk score far more effective for diabetes diagnosis
Researchers at the University of Exeter and the Pacific Northwest Research Institute in Seattle have developed a new risk score which takes into account detailed genetic information known to increase the chances of type 1 diabetes.
Body-painting protects against bloodsucking insects
A study by researchers from Sweden and Hungary shows that white, painted stripes on the body protect skin from insect bites.
Understanding insulators with conducting edges
Insulators that are conducting at their edges hold promise for interesting technological applications.
Complex molecules emerge without evolution or design
In biology, folded proteins are responsible for most advanced functions.
HPV vaccination rates remain critically low among younger adolescents in the US
Only about 16 percent of US adolescents have been fully vaccinated against human papillomavirus (HPV) by the time they turn 13, despite national recommendations that call for vaccination at 11 to 12 years of age.
Scientists confirm pair of skeletons are from same early hominin species
Separate skeletons suggested to be from different early hominin species are, in fact, from the same species, a team of anthropologists has concluded in a comprehensive analysis of remains first discovered a decade ago.
Mindfulness may ease menopausal symptoms
Mindfulness may be associated with fewer menopausal symptoms for women, according to a Mayo Clinic study recently published in Climacteric: The Journal of the International Menopause Society.
The limonene myth (video)
Limonene, a compound found in citrus fruits, has two enantiomers: mirror-image molecules that cannot be superimposed, like a left and right hand.
Mapping the brain at high resolution
Researchers have developed a technique to image the brain with unprecedented resolution and speed.
Coming soon: A blood test for Alzheimer's disease?
People with symptoms of Alzheimer's disease (AD), such as cognitive difficulties, behavior changes and mood swings, may wait months or even years to get a definitive diagnosis.
Zika and Chikungunya viruses: Diagnostic pitfalls
Millions of people have contracted Zika and chikungunya virus infections since the outbreaks that have been striking Latin America since 2013.
Blister fluid could help diagnose burn severity
Severe burns can leave physical and psychological scars, especially in children.
Combination therapy more effective in treating patients with leishmaniasis and HIV
The results of clinical trials conducted in Ethiopia by the Drugs for Neglected Diseases initiative (DNDi), in partnership with Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF), the University of Gondar, and Addis Ababa University, open the way for more effective and safer treatments for people with both HIV and visceral leishmaniasis (VL), a group of patients who have historically suffered from poor treatment options.
The cytoskeleton of neurons has been found to be involved in Alzheimer's disease
A researcher at the UPV/EHU has participated in a study describing what it is during the early stages of Alzheimer's that triggers the loss of dynamics and subsequent impairment of the dendritic spines, the compartments of the neurons responsible for receiving nerve impulses from other neurons.
Proposed engineering method could help make buildings and bridges safer
Kanazawa University researchers discovered that the distance between dislocations in nanolayer interfaces of pearlite can determine how much the material can stretch or contract without breaking (ductility).

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