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Science Current Events and Science News | Brightsurf | January 18, 2019


Does being bilingual make children more focused? Study says no
Bilingual children do not have more advantages than monolingual children when it comes to executive function, which includes remembering instructions, controlling responses, and shifting swiftly between tasks, according to a new study published in PLOS One.
Improved maternity care practices decrease racial gaps in breastfeeding in the US South
A new paper published in Pediatrics links successful implementation of Baby-Friendly™ practices in the southern US with increases in breastfeeding rates and improved, evidence-based care.
New study shows physician-targeted marketing is associated with increase in opioid overdose deaths
New research from NYU School of Medicine and Boston Medical Center published online Jan.
Researchers find short bouts of stairclimbing throughout the day can boost health
It just got harder to avoid exercise. A few minutes of stair climbing, at short intervals throughout the day, can improve cardiovascular health, according to new research from kinesiologists at McMaster University and UBC Okanagan.
New technologies enable better-than-ever details on genetically modified plants
Salk researchers have mapped the genomes and epigenomes of genetically modified plant lines with the highest resolution ever to reveal exactly what happens at a molecular level when a piece of foreign DNA is inserted.
Have new appointment wait times improved at VA health care system?
This study compared new appointment wait times in the US Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) health care system with wait times in the private sector.
Fidarestat prevents high-fat diet-induced intestinal polyps in ApcMin/+ mice
Recent epidemiological and experimental studies have shown that obesity is a major risk factor for Colorectal Cancer (CRC).
Placentas adapt when mothers have poor diets or low oxygen during pregnancy
Cambridge researchers have discovered the placenta regulates how much oxygen and nutrients it transports to babies during challenging pregnancies in the first study of its kind.
Long periods of undisturbed sleep during pregnancy may be associated with stillbirth
Sleeping more than nine hours per night during pregnancy may be associated with late stillbirth, a new Michigan Medicine-led international study suggests.
'Happiness' exercises can boost mood in those recovering from substance use disorder
Brief, text-based, self-administered exercises can significantly increase in-the-moment happiness for adults recovering from substance use disorders, report researchers at the Massachusetts General Hospital Recovery Research Institute
Signs of memory problems could be symptoms of hearing loss instead
Older adults concerned about displaying early symptoms of Alzheimer's disease should also consider a hearing check-up, suggest recent findings.
Home-based hypertension program produces 'striking' results
Pilot study by Brigham investigators finds that an innovative care-delivery program helped 81 percent of participants achieve blood pressure control in seven weeks.
Why do Hydra end up with just a single head?
Hydra is able to regenerate any part of its body to rebuild an entire individual.
Scientists discover natural fitness watch in fishes that records their activity levels
An international research team including scientists from the University of Southampton have shown for the first time that the energetic cost of living (the metabolic rate) of fish can be measured in structures that grow in their ears.
Bioengineering & Translational Medicine honors biotech pioneers Langer and Peppas
Bioengineering & Translational Medicine (BioTM), published by Wiley on behalf of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE) and its Society for Biological Engineering (SBE), has released a tribute issue dedicated to research inspired by Robert Langer and Nicholas Peppas -- two biotechnology luminaries whose game-changing contributions to drug delivery and biomaterials have made those fields integral elements of modern chemical engineering research and education.
Mediterranean freshwater fish species susceptible to climate change
Climate change will strongly affect many European freshwater fish species.
Smart microrobots that can adapt to their surroundings
Scientists at EPFL and ETH Zurich have developed tiny elastic robots that can change shape depending on their surroundings.
Targeting 'hidden pocket' for treatment of stroke and seizure
By closely examining a special neuron receptor that is involved in memory, learning, and much more, researchers have identified a hidden molecular 'pocket.' By creating chemical compounds that affect this pocket only in very specific circumstances, they are one step closer to creating ideal treatments for stroke and seizures.
How gut bacteria affect the treatment of Parkinson's disease
Patients with Parkinson's disease are treated with levodopa, which is converted into dopamine, a neurotransmitter in the brain.
Nerve growth factor: Early studies and recent clinical trials
NGF is the first discovered member of a family of neurotrophic factors, collectively indicated as neurotrophins, (which include brain-derived neurotrophic factor, neurotrophin-3 and neurotrophin 4/5).
No substantial benefit from transplantation reported for a high-risk leukemia subtype
Study led by St. Jude Children's Research Hospital found treatment guided by measuring minimal residual disease was associated with better outcomes for hypodiploid acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients.
Researchers discover synaptic logic for connections between two brain hemispheres
Researchers at the Max Planck Florida Institute for Neuroscience have developed a new combination of technologies that allows them to identify the functional properties of individual synapses that link the two hemispheres and determine how they are arranged within a neuron's dendritic field.
Firsthand accounts indicate fentanyl test strips are effective in reducing overdose risk
Young adults who use drugs find fentanyl test strips useful, residue testing more convenient and testing at home more private, a Brown study found.
Exposure to chemicals during pregnancy is not associated with an increase in blood pressure
New study analyses the health impact of exposure to 21 non-persistent chemicals among pregnant women
Waves in Saturn's rings give precise measurement of planet's rotation rate
Saturn's distinctive rings were observed in unprecedented detail by NASA's Cassini spacecraft, and scientists have now used those observations to probe the interior of the giant planet and obtain the first precise determination of its rotation rate.
Is marketing of opioids to physicians associated with overdose deaths?
This study examined the association between pharmaceutical company marketing of opioids to physicians and subsequent death from prescription opioid overdoses across US counties.
Antibodies to a retina protein to be used as a kidney cancer marker
Sechenov University together with their German colleagues suggest a new highly sensitive, quick, and pain-free method for diagnosing kidney cancer.
Classic double-slit experiment in a new light
An international research group has developed a new X-ray spectroscopy method based on the classical double-slit experiment to gain new insights into the physical properties of solids.
Gene therapy promotes nerve regeneration
Researchers from the Netherlands Institute for Neuroscience and the Leiden University Medical Center have shown that treatment using gene therapy leads to a faster recovery after nerve damage.
New therapeutic avenue in the fight against chronic liver disease
A recent study, affiliated with South Korea's Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST) has introduced a novel targeted drug delivery system in the fight against cancer.
Hand-knitted molecules
Molecules are usually formed in reaction vessels or laboratory flasks.
UTA herpetologists describe new species of snake found in stomach of predator snake
Herpetologists at The University of Texas at Arlington have described a previously unknown species of snake that was discovered inside the stomach of another snake more than four decades ago.
Green turtle: The success of the reintroduction program in Cayman Islands
The reintroduction program for the green turtle in the Cayman Islands has been crucial in order to recover this species, which are threatened by the effects of human overexploitation, according to the first genetic study of the green turtle's reintroduction program in this area of the Atlantic ocean.
Enhanced NMR reveals chemical structures in a fraction of the time
MIT researchers have developed a way to dramatically enhance the sensitivity of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR), a technique used to study the structure and composition of many kinds of molecules, including proteins linked to Alzheimer's and other diseases.
Researchers identify specific cognitive deficits in individuals with spinal cord injury
''People often focus on mobility impairments associated with SCI; however, addressing cognitive deficits in this population is also critically important,'' said co-author Dr.
Liver cancer patients can be treated for Hep C infection
A large, multi-center study refutes earlier suggestions that antiviral drugs for treating hepatitis C may lead to a higher recurrence of liver cancer.
Researchers examine how musicians communicate non-verbally during performance
A team of researchers from McMaster University has discovered a new technique to examine how musicians intuitively coordinate with one another during a performance, silently predicting how each will express the music.
Using bacteria to create a water filter that kills bacteria
Engineers have created a bacteria-filtering membrane using graphene oxide and bacterial nanocellulose.
Plant peptide helps roots to branch out in the right places
How do plants space out their roots? A Japanese research team has identified a peptide and its receptor that help lateral roots to grow with the right spacing.
Otoliths -- the fish's black box -- also keeps an eye on the metabolism
For the first time ever, an international research team has shown that fish otoliths record information on fish metabolism.
Researchers find new ways to harness wasted methane
A recent study, affiliated with South Korea's Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST) presented new ways to harness wasted methane.
Mangrove patches deserve greater recognition no matter the size
Governments must provide stronger protection for crucial small mangrove patches, is the call led by scientists at international conservation charity ZSL (Zoological Society of London), which hosts the IUCN SSC Mangrove Specialist Group, in a letter published in Science today (18 January 2019).
Musculoskeletal and rheumatic diseases induced by immune checkpoint inhibitors
Immune checkpoint inhibitors are a new promising class of antitumor drugs that have been associated with a number of immune-related Adverse Events (AEs), including musculoskeletal and rheumatic disease.
Tinkering with public debt we doom innovation and growth
New research by Bocconi University's Mariano Max Croce and colleagues finds that public debt is bad for growth also because it hinders innovative firms' investment.
Resisting the exploitation of black women's reproductive labor in the United States
In 'Milk Money: Race, Gender, and Breast Milk 'Donation,'' published in Signs: Journal of Women in Culture and Society, Laura Harrison demonstrates the exploitative, racially charged nature of Milk Money, a failed pilot program by the Mothers Milk Cooperative and Medolac Laboratories.
Untargeted metabolomics for atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases
Cardiovascular Disease (CVD) is the leading cause of mortality and morbidity worldwide.
Some pregnant women don't believe cannabis is harmful to their fetus
Up to one-third of pregnant women do not believe cannabis is harmful to their fetus, according to a new review by UBC researchers.
Collision resonances between ultracold atom and molecules visualized for the first time
For the first time, a team led by Prof. Jian-Wei Pan and Prof.

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