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Science News | Science Current Events | Brightsurf | January 22, 2019


Artificial intelligence can dramatically cut time needed to process abnormal chest X-rays
New research has found that a novel Artificial Intelligence (AI) system can dramatically reduce the time needed to ensure that abnormal chest X-rays with critical findings will receive an expert radiologist opinion sooner, cutting the average delay from 11 days to less than three days.
WSU sociologist sees environmental support slip under democratic presidents
Erik Johnson has what looks like a surefire way to hurt support for spending to protect the environment: Elect a Democratic president.
Test for esophageal cancer could save millions of lives
Cancer of the esophagus claims more than 400,000 lives around the world each year.
Not only do Gulf of Aqaba corals survive climate change but their offspring may too
Parent corals from the Gulf of Aqaba that experience increased temperatures and ocean acidification stress during the peak reproductive period are not only able to maintain normal physiological function, but also have the same reproductive output and produce offspring that function and survive as well as those which were produced under today's ambient water conditions.
Plants blink: Proceeding with caution in sunlight
Plants have control mechanisms that resemble those in human senses.
Early detection of prediabetes can reduce risk of developing cardiovascular disease
A diagnosis of prediabetes should be a warning for people to make lifestyle changes to prevent both full-blown diabetes and cardiovascular disease (CVD), according to scientists at Wake Forest School of Medicine.
Rising temperatures may safeguard crop nutrition as climate changes
Recent research has shown that rising carbon dioxide levels will likely boost yields, but at the cost of nutrition.
Possible Oahu populations offer new hope for Hawaiian seabirds
The two seabird species unique to Hawaii, Newell's shearwaters and Hawaiian petrels, are the focus of major conservation efforts -- at risk from habitat degradation, invasive predators, and other threats, their populations plummeted 94 percent and 78 percent respectively between 1993 and 2013.
Women, your inner circle may be key to gaining leadership roles
According to a new Notre Dame study, women who communicate regularly with a female-dominated inner circle are more likely to attain high-ranking leadership positions.
Milky Way's neighbors pick up the pace
After slowly forming stars for the first few billion years of their lives, the Magellanic Clouds, near neighbors of our own Milky Way galaxy, have upped their game and are now forming new stars at a fast clip.
Significant disparities between educational groups in smoking during pregnancy
With the help of a multidisciplinary register and questionnaire study, Finnish researchers showed that both the educational level and its occupational orientation predict the mother's smoking during early pregnancy.
Multi-hop communication: Frog choruses inspire wireless sensor networks
A team including researchers from Osaka University looked to nature for inspiration in designing more effective wireless sensor networks.
Aspirin may lower stroke risk in women with history of preeclampsia
A new study by Columbia researchers suggests aspirin may lower stroke risk among middle-aged women with a history of preeclampsia.
White blood cells related to allergies may also be harnessed to destroy cancer cells
A new Tel Aviv University study finds that white blood cells which are responsible for chronic asthma and modern allergies may be used to eliminate malignant colon cancer cells.
Rutgers study uncovers cause of bone loss in joint implant patients
Rutgers researchers have discovered the long-sought reason that many people with joint replacements experience harmful inflammation and bone loss.
Mesoporous nickel could help to expand capacity of hydrogen engines and solar cells
Scientists of the Far Eastern Federal University, together with Russian and foreign colleagues, developed samples of nickel mesoporous film structures, which have useful surface area up to 400 times greater than their solid one.
Negative experiences on social media tied to higher odds of feeling lonely
Positive interactions on social media are not making young adults feel more connected, whereas negative experiences increase the likelihood of them reporting loneliness.
From toilet to brickyard: Recycling biosolids to make sustainable bricks
Around 30 percent of the world's biosolids are stockpiled or sent to landfill each year, while over 3 billion cubic meters of clay soil is dug up for the global brickmaking industry.
Study offers promise for preventing necrotizing enterocolitis in preemies
Researchers at Stanley Manne Children's Research Institute at Ann & Robert H.
Diet low in added sugars significantly improves fatty liver disease in children
A randomized clinical study of adolescent boys with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) found that a diet low in free sugars (those sugars added to foods and beverages and occurring naturally in fruit juices) resulted in significant improvement in NAFLD compared to a usual diet.
New insights into magnetic quantum effects in solids
Using a new computational method, an international collaboration has succeeded for the first time in systematically investigating magnetic quantum effects in the well-known 3D pyrochlore Heisenberg model.
Forest soils need many decades to recover from fires and logging
A landmark study from The Australian National University has found that forest soils need several decades to recover from bushfires and logging -- much longer than previously thought.
Faulty molecular master switch may contribute to AMD
A signaling pathway controlled by transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta) could be involved in the progression of age-related macular degeneration (AMD).
Supplement makes (mouse) moms' milk better; pups benefit for life
Giving nursing mouse mothers a supplement called nicotinamide riboside (NR) promotes maternal weight loss, boosts milk production and quality, and leads to long-lasting physical, neurological, and behavioral benefits in the pups.
Study confirms 1-hour discharge rule for patients given naloxone after opiate overdose
Suspected opioid overdose patients treated with naloxone are safe for discharge from the emergency department after one hour.
Graphene and related materials safety: human health and the environment
Graphene Flagship researchers reviewed the current research into the safety of graphene and related materials looking at both human health and environmental impact.
To halt malaria transmission, more research focused on human behavior needed
Wherever possible, researchers should not just focus on mosquito behavior when working to eliminate malaria, but must also consider how humans behave at night when the risk of being bitten by an infected mosquito is highest, new findings from the Johns Hopkins Center for Communication Programs (CCP) suggest.
Good neighbors
In the animal kingdom, food access is among the biggest drivers of habitat preference.
Temple researchers show synthetic flaxseed derivative helps heart function in septic mice
Sepsis is a life-threatening condition that develops in response to infection.
Erasing memories associated with cocaine use reduces drug seeking behavior
Researchers identified the brain circuits that form memories associating environmental cues with cocaine use.
Investigators close in on best treatment guidelines for critical limb ischemia
A new report in the Journal of Vascular Surgery chronicles a multi-site randomized controlled trial that seeks to compare treatment efficacy, functional outcomes, cost effectiveness, and quality of life for 2,100 patients suffering from the condition.
Parents' mental health problems increase risk of reactive attachment disorder in children
Children's risk of being diagnosed with reactive attachment disorder (RAD) increases if parents are diagnosed with any type of mental health disorder, discovered researchers from the Research Centre for Child Psychiatry of the University of Turku, Finland.
Dengue virus immunity may protect children from Zika symptoms
Previous infection with dengue virus may protect children from symptomatic Zika, according to a study published Jan.
Near-term climate prediction 'coming of age', study shows
The quest for climate scientists to be able to bridge the gap between shorter-term seasonal forecasts and long-term climate projections is 'coming of age', a study shows.
On its own, Trump admin's price disclosure policy unlikely to help curb drug prices
The Trump administration's proposal to require pharmaceutical companies to publish drug prices in TV ads is unlikely to help control drug prices, according to a new study in JAMA Internal Medicine.
A new method developed to produce precursors for high-strength carbon fibers processing
Carbon fiber is an important structural material of the 21st century.
Price disclosure legislation unlikely to lower drug costs
The Trump administration's proposal to require pharmaceutical companies to publish drug prices in TV ads is unlikely to help control drug prices, according to a study publishing Jan.
Chemists develop new synthesis method for producing fluorinated piperidines
A team of chemists at the University of Münster led by Professor Frank Glorius have developed a new, simple synthetic method for producing fluorinated piperidines -- which had previously been very difficult.
Machine learning could reduce testing, improve treatment for intensive care patients
Doctors in intensive care units face a continual dilemma: Every blood test they order could yield critical information, but also adds costs and risks for patients.
Trout, salamander populations quickly bounce back from severe drought conditions
Populations of coastal cutthroat trout and coastal giant salamanders in the Pacific Northwest show the ability to rebound quickly from drought conditions, buying some time against climate change.
How psychological science is benefiting the world
Technological advances have allowed psychological scientists to measure everything from cognitive impairments to everyday decision-making.
Noninvasive light-sensitive recombinase for deep brain genetic manipulation
A KAIST team presents a noninvasive light-sensitive photoactivatable recombinase suitable for genetic manipulation in vivo.
Parental PTSD affects health behavior and aging among offspring of Holocaust survivors
A new study on intergenerational transmission of trauma has found evidence that Holocaust survivors suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder and their adult offspring exhibit more unhealthy behavior patterns and age less successfully in comparison to survivors with no signs of PTSD or parents who did not experience the Holocaust and their offspring.
Older caregivers report worse well-being when providing minimal assistance
Providing less than an hour of help to an elderly person can take a surprising emotional toll on older caregivers, says a University of Michigan researcher.
Feeling groovy: Neurons integrate better with muscle grown on grooved platforms
Growing muscle tissue on grooved platforms helps neurons more effectively integrate with the muscle, a requirement for engineering muscle in the lab that responds and functions like muscle in the body, University of Illinois researchers found in a new study.
Assessing the airborne survival of bacteria in aerosol droplets from coughs and sneezes
The airborne transmission of diseases including the common cold, influenza and tuberculosis is something that affects everyone with an average sneeze or cough sending around 100,000 contagious germs into the air at speeds of up to 100 miles per hour.
How hot are atoms in the shock wave of an exploding star?
A new method to measure the temperature of atoms during the explosive death of a star will help scientists understand the shock wave that occurs as a result of this supernova explosion.
Study predicts how air pollutants from US forest soils will increase with climate change
Scientists predict that certain regions of the United States will experience higher levels of pollutants that cause smog, acid rain and respiratory problems due changes in forest soils from climate change.
Green fluorescence from reef-building corals attracts symbiotic algae
The researchers discovered a biological signal from corals that attracts potential symbionts.
Blocking toxic-protein production in ALS
An approved drug that blocks an integrated stress response shows promise in preliminary tests against ALS and frontotemporal dementia.
Multiple sclerosis -- Helping cells to help themselves
Diseases such as multiple sclerosis are characterized by damage to the 'myelin sheath', a protective covering wrapped around nerve cells akin to insulation around an electrical wire.
Youth with disabilities have increased risk for technology-involved peer harassment
New research from the University of New Hampshire finds that while youths with disabilities, mental health diagnoses and special education services experience peer harassment or bullying at similar rates as other youth, understanding differences in how they experience it may lead to solutions that minimize risk to all youth.
Improved plastics recycling thanks to spectral imaging
Plastics recycling is complicated by the need to recycle similar plastics together.
Farm manure boosts greenhouse gas emissions -- even in winter
Researchers have shown, for the first time, that manure used to fertilize croplands in spring and summer can dramatically increase greenhouse gas emissions in winter.
Human respiratory viruses continue to spread in wild chimpanzees
Less than two years after the first report of wild chimpanzees in Uganda dying as a result of a human 'common cold' virus, a new study has identified two other respiratory viruses of human origin in chimpanzee groups in the same forest.
Study examines drug treatments for newborns exposed to opioids during pregnancy
Neonatal abstinence syndrome describes symptoms (including jitteriness, high-pitched crying, sweating and diarrhea) that primarily occur in newborns exposed to opioids during pregnancy.
Shift work for mothers associated with reduced fetal growth and longer pregnancies
New research published in The Journal of Physiology indicates shift work exposure in mothers can result in reduced fetal growth and longer pregnancies, even when the shift work is only carried out early in pregnancy.
It may be possible to restore memory function in Alzheimer's, preclinical study finds
Research published today (Jan. 22) in the journal Brain reveals a new approach to Alzheimer's disease (AD) that may eventually make it possible to reverse memory loss, a hallmark of the disease in its late stages.
Creating attraction between molecules deep in the periodic table
A McGill-led international research team provides the first experimental and theoretical proof that it is possible to form strong, stable attractions between some of the heavier elements in the periodic table -- such as arsenic or even antimony.
UMass Amherst materials chemists tap body heat to power 'smart garments'
Many wearable biosensors, data transmitters and similar tech advances for personalized health monitoring have now been 'creatively miniaturized,' says materials chemist Trisha Andrew at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, but they require a lot of energy, and power sources can be bulky and heavy.
Scientists boost stability of low-cost, large-area solar modules
Modifications made to perovskite solar cells, or PSCs, render them more stable and scalable than ever before.
2D magnetism reaches a new milestone
Researchers at the IBS Center for Correlated Electron Systems, in collaboration with Sogang University and Seoul National University, reported the first experimental observation of a XY-type antiferromagnetic material, whose magnetic order becomes unstable when it is reduced to one-atom thickness.
Antiepileptic drugs linked to accumulation of hospital days in persons with Alzheimer's disease
People with Alzheimer's disease who used antiepileptic drugs had a higher number of accumulated hospital days than people with Alzheimer's disease who did not use antiepileptics, according to a new study from the University of Eastern Finland.
Liver transplants double for alcohol-related liver disease
The proportion of US liver transplants for alcohol-associated liver disease (ALD) has doubled in the last 15 years, in part due to broader acceptance of waiving the mandated period of sobriety before transplants for this population, according to a study by researchers at UC San Francisco, which showed ongoing regional geographic variations in liver transplant rates for ALD patients, whose long-term survival rate is slightly lower than other liver transplant patients.
Racial discrimination increases activism in black young adults
A recent study finds that experiencing racial discrimination makes black teens and young adults more likely to engage in social and political activism on issues that are important to black communities.
Health literacy linked to blood pressure medication adherence among Hispanics
Good health literacy is associated with better adherence to blood pressure medications among Hispanic individuals with high blood pressure, finds a study by NYU Rory Meyers College of Nursing and Columbia University School of Nursing.
Widely available food in US workplaces: Perk or hazard?
Nearly a quarter of employed adults obtain foods and beverages at work at least once a week, according to a new study from the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and published in the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics.
Exercise before surgery can protect both muscle and nerves, study suggests
Exercise can protect both muscle and nerves from damage caused by the restoration of blood flow after injury or surgery, new research from the University of Virginia School of Medicine shows.
Breastmilk sugars differ in pregnant women on probiotics
The complex sugars found in human breastmilk, long believed to be fixed in their composition, may change in women who are taking probiotics, according to new research from the University of Rochester Medical Center (URMC).
Heating up cold tumors
A Ludwig Cancer Research study has uncovered a cellular mechanism by which melanomas that fail to respond to checkpoint blockade may be made susceptible to such immunotherapies.
Urbanization changes shape of mosquitoes' wings
Research shows that rapid urbanization in São Paulo City, Brazil, is influencing wing morphology in the mosquitoes that transmit dengue and malaria.
Seeing double could help resolve dispute about how fast the universe is expanding
How fast the universe is expanding has been puzzling astronomers for almost a century.
Children who had a dengue infection could be protected from symptomatic Zika
A prior dengue virus infection could protect children from symptomatic Zika virus infection, according to a study by an international group of researchers including those from the University of Michigan and the University of California, Berkeley.
Study identifies new genes associated with the leading cause of blindness
A new study, published in Clinical Epigenetics, identifies genes associated with Age-related Macular Degeneration (AMD) that could represent new targets for future drug development.
New applications for encapsulated nanoparticles with promising properties
The Polymerisation Process research group of the POLYMAT institute of the UPV/EHU-University of the Basque Country has managed to efficiently encapsulate semiconductor nanocrystals or quantum dots of various sizes into polymer particles; great stability in terms of their optical properties and good fluorescence control when combining different quantum dots have been achieved.
Unique camera enables researchers to see the world the way birds do
Using a specially designed camera, researchers at Lund University in Sweden have succeeded for the first time in recreating how birds see colours in their surroundings.
Ancient climate change triggered warming that lasted thousands of years
A rapid rise in temperature on ancient Earth triggered a climate response that may have prolonged the warming for many thousands of years, according to scientists.
New method uses ultraviolet light to control fluid flow and organize particles
A new, simple, and inexpensive method that uses ultraviolet light to control particle motion and assembly within liquids could improve drug delivery, chemical sensors, and fluid pumps.
All too human
Professor Rony Paz of the Weizmann Institute of Science suggests that our brains are like modern washing machines -- evolved to have the latest sophisticated programming, but more vulnerable to breakdown and prone to develop costly disorders.
Why you should be concerned about Oprah Winfrey when introducing an innovation
New research by Bocconi University's Paola Cillo and Gaia Rubera with Texas A&M's David Griffith asserts that the reaction of large individual investors to innovation is an important component of stock returns, their reaction to innovation depends on their national culture, and there is a way to segment large individual investors and pitch innovation to them accordingly.
Annals of Family Medicine media tip sheet
Annals of Family Medicine is a peer-reviewed, indexed research journal that provides a cross-disciplinary forum for new, evidence-based information affecting the primary care disciplines.
Payments to physicians may increase opioid prescribing
US doctors who receive direct payments from opioid manufacturers tend to prescribe more opioids than doctors who receive no such payments, according to new research published by Addiction.
Physicians: Treat eSport players as college athletes
ESport teams require preventive care, injury treatment protocols, according to a study in the British Journal of Medicine.
New skin test detects prion infection before symptoms appear
Prions can infect both humans and animals, causing Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) in humans, mad cow disease in cattle, and chronic wasting disease in elk and deer.
When bad financial advisers happen to good people
Over 650,000 registered financial advisers in the United States help manage over $30 trillion of investible assets and represent approximately 10 percent of total employment of the finance and insurance sector.
The feminization of men leads to a rise in homophobia
Before the feminist revolution, men built their masculinity on traits that opposed those assigned to women.
Frequent use of aspirin can lead to increased bleeding
A new study published today in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) has found that taking aspirin on a regular basis to prevent heart attacks and strokes, can lead to an increase risk of almost 50 percent in major bleeding episodes.
Dengue immunity may be protective against symptomatic Zika, study finds
Children with a history of prior dengue virus infection had a significantly lower risk of being symptomatic when infected by Zika virus, according to a study in Nicaragua of more than 3,000 children aged 2 to 14 years.
New mutations causing inherited deaf-blindness have been discovered
A team of scientists from Sechenov First Moscow State Medical University (MSMU) together with their colleagues from leading scientific centers of Moscow and India described a number of genetic mutations causing Usher syndrome (inherited deaf-blindness).
Long-read DNA analysis can give rise to errors, experts warn
Advanced technologies that read long strings of DNA can produce flawed data that could affect genetic studies, research from the University of Edinburgh's Roslin Institute suggests.
Stressed? Having a partner present -- even in your mind -- may keep blood pressure down
Visualizing your significant other may be just as effective as having them in the room with you when it comes to managing the body's cardiovascular response to stressful situations, according to a University of Arizona study.
Blood test shows promise for early detection of severe lung-transplant rejection
Researchers have developed a simple blood test that can detect when a newly transplanted lung is being rejected by a patient, even when no outward signs of the rejection are evident.
Liver transplant for alcohol-related liver disease in US
The proportion of liver transplants in the United States for alcohol-associated liver disease increased between 2002 and 2016, with much of the increase associated with a decrease in liver transplant for hepatitis C virus infection because of antiviral therapy.
Analyzing aspirin use in patients without cardiovascular disease
This study analyzed combined results from 13 randomized clinical trials with more than 164,000 participants to assess aspirin use with the prevention of cardiovascular events and bleeding in people without cardiovascular disease.
Study looks at ranger motivation in dangerous African park
A new study looks at the job satisfaction of front line conservation rangers working in challenging conditions at a national park in the eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) and identifies ways to improve motivation to make them more effective at enforcing the law.
Fewer than half of adults and youth with type 1 diabetes in the US achieve treatment goals
A new study has shown that only a minority of patients in the US with type 1 diabetes (T1D) achieve target levels of hemoglobin A1c, a measure of blood glucose management over time.
A fleeting moment in time
The faint, ephemeral glow emanating from the planetary nebula ESO 577-24 persists for only a short time -- around 10,000 years, a blink of an eye in astronomical terms.
Fralin Biomedical Research Institute scientists link concussions to epilepsy development
Experiments by Fralin Biomedical Research Institute scientists show a strong relationship between changes in astrocytes after mild traumatic brain injury and the eventual occurrence of a seizure.
Increasing skepticism against robots
In Europe, people are more reserved regarding robots than they were five years ago.
Emerging significance of gammaherpesvirus and morbillivirus infections in cats
Emerging infectious diseases comprise a substantial fraction of important human infections, with potentially devastating global health and economic impacts.
Bifacial stem cells produce wood and bast
So-called bifacial stem cells are responsible for one of the most critical growth processes on Earth -- the formation of wood.
Without habitat management, small land parcels do not protect birds
Designating relatively small parcels of land as protected areas for wildlife with no habitat management -- which has frequently been done in urban-suburban locales around the world -- likely does not benefit declining songbird species, according to a team of researchers who studied a long-protected northeastern virgin forest plot.
Artificial intelligence shows potential for triaging chest X-rays
An artificial intelligence (AI) system can interpret and prioritize abnormal chest X-rays with critical findings, potentially reducing the backlog of exams and bringing urgently needed care to patients more quickly, according to a new study.
Study shows low-sugar diet effective in boys with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease
Researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine found that a diet low in free sugars (those added to foods and beverages and occurring naturally in fruit juices) resulted in significant improvement in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in adolescent boys.
Infectious disease researchers unveil the secret life of flesh-eating bacteria
Using a tool first used for strep throat in horses, Houston Methodist researchers unveiled the secret life of flesh-eating bacteria, learning how it causes severe disease while living deep within muscle.
Famous freak wave recreated in laboratory mirrors Hokusai's 'Great Wave'
A team of researchers based at the Universities of Oxford and Edinburgh have recreated for the first time the famous Draupner freak wave measured in the North Sea in 1995.
From nurses to conquerors: this single gene turns bees into social parasites
A small change in the genetic makeup of the South African Cape bee turns the socially organised animal into a fighting parasite.
Having stressed out ancestors improves immune response to stress
Having ancestors who were frequently exposed to stressors can improve one's own immune response to stressors, according to Penn State researchers.
Scientists demonstrate effective strategies for safeguarding CRISPR gene-drive experiments
Researchers have demonstrated for the first time how two molecular strategies can safeguard CRISPR gene-drive experiments in the lab, according to a study published today in eLife.
Outbreak of paralyzing disease linked to non-polio enterovirus through TGen-led study
Using multiple genomic sequencing tests, TGen identified a specific non-polio enterovirus -- EV-D68 -- among at least four children, according to a study published today in the scientific journal mBio.
Possible link between rotavirus vaccine and decline in type 1 diabetes
A drop in the number of young children diagnosed with type 1 diabetes could be associated with the introduction of routine rotavirus vaccination of Australian infants, according to a new study by Melbourne researchers.
Possible link found between cases of high blood pressure and 'unhealthy' shopping centers
A new study using Pop-Up health check stations found a possible link between 'unhealthy' shopping centers and the number of cases of suspected or diagnosed high blood pressure recorded for people who volunteered for checks.
Invisible labor can negatively impact well-being in mothers
Keeping track of who wears which costume, the location of soccer cleats and what is in the pantry are all examples invisible labor, or the mental and emotional effort required of mothers as they raise children and manage households.
Surveillance in our schools
ClassDojo is one of the most popular education apps in the world.
Inability to integrate reward info contributes to undervalued rewards in schizophrenia
People with schizophrenia have a hard time integrating information about a reward -- the size of the reward and the probability of receiving it -- when assessing its value, according to a study in Biological Psychiatry: Cognitive Neuroscience and Neuroimaging.
Illinois team helping to unravel the mysteries of the hagfish's slimy defense
The hagfish dates back at least 300 million years. The secret of survival for these eel-like sea creatures can be found in the rate and volume of slime it produces to fend off predators.
Fewer medical tests -- timely listing for transplantation
Younger patients would benefit greatly from kidney transplantation. Their expected remaining lifetime may even be doubled by having a transplant.
New research proposes target omega-3 DHA level for pregnant women
A new scientific paper has, for the first time, proposed an omega-3 DHA target blood level of 5 percent or higher for pregnant women who want to reduce their risk of preterm birth.
How much rainforest do birds need?
Researchers of the Department of Conservation Biology at the University of Göttingen have carried out research in Southwest Cameroon to assess which proportion of forest would be necessary in order to provide sufficient habitat for rainforest bird species.
Human mutation rate has slowed recently
Researchers from Aarhus University, Denmark, and Copenhagen Zoo have discovered that the human mutation rate is significantly slower than for our closest primate relatives.
Evolution of national policy determines the degree of Spanish citizens' trust in the EU
Since 2008, political trust in European institutions has greatly deteriorated in many member states, including Spain, and has given rise to increasing research into its causes.
Dry inland waters are underrated players in climate change
Climate change causes an increase in the number of freshwaters that run dry, at least temporarily.
Researchers uncover migratory schedule of swallows, new study
The study is the first to track the timing of 12 geographically distinct breeding populations of tree swallows across the continent.
Bird beaks did not adapt to food types as previously thought
A study, led by the University of Bristol, has shed some new light on how the beaks of birds have adapted over time.

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