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Science Current Events and Science News | Brightsurf | January 25, 2019


Cellular stress at the movies
For the first time, biological imaging experts have used a custom fluorescence microscope and a novel antibody tagging tool to watch living cells undergoing stress.
A powerful catalyst for electrolysis of water that could help harness renewable energy
An international collaboration of Scientists at Dongguk University developed a novel nickel-based hydroxide compound that can be used as a powerful catalyst for the electrolysis of water.
ESC press release: Loss of muscle and weight associated with disability after stroke
Loss of muscle and body weight is associated with disability after stroke, reports a study presented today at Heart & Stroke 2019, a meeting of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) Council on Stroke, and published in the Journal of Cachexia, Sarcopenia and Muscle.
Language used on credit card websites the hardest to understand
New research led by the University of East Anglia reveals how easy it is for consumers to understand the language used on personal finance websites.
Fish oil does not appear to improve asthma control in teens, young adults
Fish oil does not appear to improve asthma control in adolescents and young adults with uncontrolled asthma who are overweight or obese, according to new research published online in the Annals of the American Thoracic Society.
Researchers discover key protein in the production of insulin
The crucial hormone insulin needs help acquiring the right structure.
Autism and theory of mind
Theory of mind, or the ability to represent other people's minds as distinct from one's own, can be difficult for people with autism.
LSTM and Imperial College Researchers design new anti-influenza drugs
Researchers at LSTM and Imperial College London have designed drugs which could help combat any potential new flu pandemic, by targeting the receptors of the cells by which the virus gains entry to the human body.
Interferon regulatory factor 6 mutations implicated in neural tube defects, including spina bifida
Mutations in a gene known as interferon regulatory factor 6 that cause cleft lip and palate also are implicated in neural tube defects such as spina bifida, suggests research by an international study team published online Jan.
Cancer patients can quit smoking through lengthened medication time, counseling support
More than 50 percent of cancer patients still smoke after being diagnosed, yet quitting smoking can significantly improve the effectiveness of cancer treatment.
Muscle memory discovery ends 'use it or lose it' dogma
Exercise physiologists agree: muscle memory is real. But how are these 'memories' stored?
New research will improve diagnosis of antenatal anxiety
A landmark study by experts at the University of Stirling will help health professionals improve the identification of severe and problematic anxiety in pregnant women.
Penn's 'enhanced recovery' protocol reduces opioid use in spinal surgery patients
A novel 'Enhanced Recovery After Surgery' (ERAS) protocol developed by Penn Medicine for patients undergoing spinal and peripheral nerve surgery significantly reduced opioid use.
MD Anderson study shows FGL2 protein may be an effective target for glioblastoma
Glioblastoma (GBM) does not attract robust T cell immune responses.
Common pain reliever can improve survival in head and neck cancer
Regular use of a common type of medication, such as aspirin and ibuprofen, significantly improves survival for a third or more patients with head and neck cancer, a new study led by UC San Francisco has found.
Medications could fill treatment gap for adolescents with obesity
Twelve independent pediatric obesity medicine and surgery specialists, led by experts at Boston Medical Center, outline an urgent need for evidence-based guidance on the use of obesity pharmacotherapy for adolescents in the Obesity research journal.
Why some mites are mightier than others: The evolution of lethal fighting in a spider mite
Unlike most male animals, some males of the social spider mite engage in deadly fights with rival males.
Helmholtz scientists identify the causes of cortisone-induced side effects
Patients undergoing long-term treatment with steroids may suffer from metabolic side effects.
Giving children the skills they need to tackle life's toughest challenges
CHLA's Dr. Joyce Javier works to give children tools they need to tackle difficult challenges.
Asthma Controller Step Down Yardstick -- treatment guidance for when asthma improves
The focus for asthma treatment is often stepping up treatment, but clinicians need to know how to step down therapy when symptoms improve.
Harvard researchers report positive trial results with artificial pancreas smartphone app
The results of a new clinical trial have shown the safety and efficacy of the interoperable Artificial Pancreas System smartphone app (iAPS), which can interface wirelessly with leading continuous glucose monitors (CGM), insulin pump devices, and decision-making algorithms.
New technology gives unprecedented look inside capillaries
A Northwestern University team has developed a new tool that images blood flow through capillaries, detecting subtle changes in capillary organization for early diagnosis of disease.
Flounders in the Gulf of Finland: Decline caused by the near disappearance of one species
Morphologically very similar species can disappear before we even notice they are there.
Injuries associated with standing electric scooter use
Nearly 250 patients ended up at two Southern California emergency departments with injuries associated with standing electric scooter use and few riders were wearing helmets.
Examination of outpatient prescribing patterns for anxiety drugs
Benzodiazepines (tranquilizers) are a large class of drugs with lots of potential uses from treating anxiety to other conditions including insomnia, seizures and neuropathic pain.
Genetically modified virus injection into tumor can treat metastatic melanoma
Results published in the Journal of the American College of Surgeons show sustained effectiveness of disease response and favorable side effect profile.
Microplastic contamination found in common source of groundwater, researchers report
Microplastics contaminate the world's surface waters, yet scientists have only just begun to explore their presence in groundwater systems.
Tachycardia in cancer patients may signal increased mortality risk
Cancer patients who experienced tachycardia within one year of cancer diagnosis had higher mortality rates up to 10 years after diagnosis of tachycardia, according to research presented at the American College of Cardiology's Advancing the Cardiovascular Care of the Oncology Patient conference.
New insight into unique sugar transport in plants
A small research group at Aarhus University has just elucidated the structure of a sugar transport protein that is unique to plants.
How sponges undermine coral reefs from within
Coral reefs are demolished from within, by bio-eroding sponges. Seeking refuge from predators, these sponges bore tunnels into the carbonate coral structures, thus weakening the reefs.
Understanding the emergence of leukemia
Acute T-cell lymphoblastic leukemia is a rare type of blood cancer that affects mostly children.
Tobacco use in adolescence is tied to paranoia, largely due to shared genetic influences
Paranoia is associated with regular tobacco smoking in adolescents after accounting for other factors like cannabis use, sleep disturbances and stressful life events, reports a study recently published to the Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry (JAACAP).
Use a microscope as a shovel? UConn researchers dig it
Using a familiar tool in a way it was never intended to be used opens up a whole new method to explore materials, report UConn researchers.
Inequality promotes deforestation in Latin America
Agricultural expansion is the main cause of deforestation in Latin America.
Anti-flu antibodies can inhibit two different viral proteins, NIH study reveals
Researchers from the National Institutes of Health have discovered that antibodies that may form the basis of a universal flu vaccine inhibit a second viral protein in addition to the one that they bind.
Fighting cancer: Scientists developed a theory of 'collective behavior' of nanoparticles
Research shows that 'collective behavior' of nanoparticles produces a unique effect.
Listeria in the feed: A dangerous hygiene problem in fattening pigs
In a recent study, researchers from Vetmeduni Vienna investigated an episode of fatal listeriosis in fattening pigs with a mortality rate of nearly 10 percent.
An integrative approach to studying lipid biology
The proteins that manage lipids in the cell are notoriously hard to study.
Women gain weight when job demands are high
Heavy pressures at work seem to predispose women to weight gain, irrespective of whether they have received an academic education.
Static electricity could charge our electronics
Static electricity is one of the most common, yet poorly understand, forms of power generation.
Drier mountains pose a double whammy for cold-adapted amphibians, says SFU study
A species of frog endemic to the Pacific Northwest faces a 50 per cent increase in the probability of extinction by the 2080s due to climate change, according to a new study published by SFU researchers in the Ecological Society of America.
UH researchers report new class of polyethylene catalyst
A team of chemists from the University of Houston has reported the discovery of a new class of catalyst to produce ultra-high-weight polyethylene, a potential new source of high-strength, abrasion-resistant plastic used for products ranging from bulletproof vests to artificial joints.
Neanderthal hunting spears could kill at a distance
Neanderthals have been imagined as the inferior cousins of modern humans, but a new study by archaeologists at UCL reveals for the first time that they produced weaponry advanced enough to kill at a distance.
Platinum forms nano-bubbles
Platinum, a noble metal, is oxidized more quickly than expected under conditions that are technologically relevant.
Do microbes control the formation of giant copper deposits?
One of the major issues when studying ore deposits formed in surficial or near-surface environments is the relationship between ore-forming processes and bacteria.
Fault lines are no barrier to safe storage of CO2 below ground
Carbon capture and storage is a reliable way to store CO2 emissions underground, with minimal chance of gas escaping through geological fault lines
The hitchhiker's guide to defeating glioblastoma
A team of investigators at Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School has begun looking at microRNAs in an entirely new way.
Putting understudied terrorists under a microscope
According to new research, the terrorist attacks we don't see on the news -- cyberattacks by far-left extremists -- are causing more widespread destruction than we know.
In myasthenia gravis, surgery to remove thymus gland provides benefits even years later
Surgery to remove the thymus gland in patients with myasthenia gravis provides significant clinical benefits for as long as five years, according to a paper published in The Lancet Neurology.
Researchers discover record-breaking salamander
Researchers at UT have discovered the largest individual of any cave salamander in North America, a 9.3-inch specimen of Berry Cave salamander.
Harsh punishment, maltreatment in childhood associated with adult antisocial behavior
Harsh physical punishment (pushing, grabbing, shoving, slapping and hitting), maltreatment (physical abuse, sexual abuse, emotional abuse, emotional neglect, physical neglect and exposure to intimate partner violence) and a combination of the two during childhood were all associated with antisocial behaviors in adulthood among men and women.
Yale psychologists find that adults take girls' pain less seriously
Gender stereotypes can hurt children -- quite literally. When asked to assess how much pain a child is experiencing based on the observation of identical reactions to a finger-stick, American adults believe boys to be in more pain than girls, according to a new Yale study in the Journal of Pediatric Psychology.
UMN researchers refine the ability to predict atrial fibrillation-related stroke
Atrial fibrillation (AFib) is associated with a five-fold increased risk of stroke.
Researchers uncover brain pathway linked to impulsive behaviors
Researchers from Singapore and South Korea have uncovered new details of a brain pathway that can cause impulsive behaviours.
A landscape unseen in over 40,000 years
Glacial retreat in the Canadian Arctic has uncovered landscapes that haven't been ice-free in more than 40,000 years and the region may be experiencing its warmest century in 115,000 years.
New therapeutic target for graft-vs-host disease could make bone marrow transplant safer
Graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is a major complication of bone marrow transplant, a potentially curative treatment for patients with blood-borne cancers such as leukemia and lymphoma.
An improved method for estimating the probability of extreme events was developed at VTT
Researchers at VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland have developed a new and more accurate method for estimating the probability of extreme events, such as storms, floods and earthquakes.
'GO dough' makes graphene easy to shape and mold
A Northwestern University team has turned graphene oxide into a soft, moldable and kneadable play dough that can be shaped and reshaped into free-standing, three-dimensional structures.
Study suggests aspirin may help some patients survive head and neck cancer
Regular use of aspirin or other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) may help some patients with head and neck cancer survive the disease, according to a study led by Professor Jennifer Grandis at the University of California, San Francisco.
Birth rates in Fukushima City before, after nuclear disaster
An earthquake and subsequent tsunami led to the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant disaster in Japan in 2011.
Scientists successfully obtain synthetic growth factor compatible to the native protein
In a recent study published in Scientific Reports, researchers at Kanazawa University show that an artificially synthesized molecule can exhibit compatible activities to natural molecules in its biological effectiveness.
New method yields higher transition temperature in superconducting materials
Researchers from the University of Houston have reported a new way to raise the transition temperature of superconducting materials, boosting the temperature at which the superconductors are able to operate.

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