Nav: Home

Science News | Science Current Events | Brightsurf | January 31, 2019


SUTD researchers developed customizable microfluidic nozzles for generating complex emulsions
Researchers from SUTD developed customizable microfluidic nozzles using the modules of 3D printed fittings and fluidic units.
China launched world's first rocket-deployed weather instruments from unmanned semi-submersible vehicle
For the first time in history, Chinese scientists have launched a rocketsonde -- a rocket designed to perform weather observations in areas beyond the range of weather balloons -- from an unmanned semi-submersible vehicle (USSV) that has been solely designed and specially developed by China for this task.
Americans concerned about weight, but don't understand link to heart conditions, health
A Cleveland Clinic survey finds that while most Americans (88 percent) understand that there is a connection between a healthy heart and a healthy weight, most aren't doing enough -- or anything -- to combat their own weight issues.
Exercise may fight depression in older adults, study suggests
New research suggests that exercise-induced muscle changes could help boost mood in older adults.
High-dose radiation therapy improves long-term survival in patients with stage-IV cancers, trial finds
The first report from a phase II, multi-center clinical trial indicates that a newer, more aggressive form of radiation therapy -- stereotactic radiation -- can extend long-term survival for some patients with stage-IV cancers while maintaining their quality of life.
Study of brine discharge from desalination plant finds good news and bad news
Before the Carlsbad Desalination Plant in Southern California began operations in 2015, scientists at UC Santa Cruz recognized an important opportunity to study the effects of the high-salinity brine that would be discharged from the plant into coastal waters.
Cooking chemistry minus heat equals new non-toxic adhesive
A new soy-based, non-toxic adhesive could be used in organic food packaging and some speciality food items.
Novel electron microscopy offers nanoscale, damage-free isotope tracking in amino acids
A new electron microscopy technique that detects the subtle changes in the weight of proteins at the nanoscale -- while keeping the sample intact -- could open a new pathway for deeper, more comprehensive studies of the basic building blocks of life.
Scientists find 'new' science instrument on Mars rover Curiosity
NASA's Curiosity Rover may have been ambling around the Gale Crater on Mars for nearly seven years but scientists have found a way to use it for something new: making the first surface gravity measurements on a planet other than Earth.
Iguana-sized dinosaur cousin discovered in Antarctica
Scientists have discovered the fossils of an iguana-sized reptile, which they named 'Antarctic king,' that lived at the South Pole 250 million years ago (it used to be warmer).
Hybrid electricity system would reduce rates, improve service
A new distribution system designed by researchers at the University of Waterloo would reduce electricity prices by more than five per cent while also improving service reliability.
Looking to choose a healthy post-workout snack? Decide early, study says
A post-exercise snack can threaten to undo the gains (or losses) of a workout.
Factors in 'alarming rate' of cold-stranded sea turtles in Cape Cod Bay
The number of cold-stunning and stranding events among juvenile Kemp's ridley sea turtles, one of the world's most endangered species, is increasing at an 'alarming' rate and has moved north from Long Island Sound to Cape Cod Bay, say researchers at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, Mass Audubon and the University of Rhode Island.
Crossbreeding threatens conservation of endangered milky storks: NUS study
A team of researchers led by Assistant Professor Frank Rheindt from the National University of Singapore has discovered that the conservation of milky storks, an endangered wading bird native to Southeast Asia, is threatened due to crossbreeding with their more widespread cousins, the painted storks.
Cultural practices improve health care for Indigenous women living with violence
The health of Indigenous women recovering from the trauma of partner violence improves when the healing process integrates elder-led circles and other cultural elements, finds new research from the University of British Columbia and Western University.
Quantum sensors providing magnetic resonance with unprecedented sensitivity
A piece of work involving international collaboration and the participation of the Quantum Technologies for Information Science (QUTIS) group of the UPV/EHU's Department of Physical Chemistry, has produced a series of protocols for quantum sensors that could allow images to be obtained by means of the nuclear magnetic resonance of single biomolecules using a minimal amount of radiation.
A correlation found between psychiatric disorders and events during the prenatal stag
Particular genetic variants in the human genome that are important for the development of the brain early in the life of the foetus are frequently found in psychiatric disorders.
Ancient asteroid impacts played a role in creation of Earth's future continents
The heavy bombardment of terrestrial planets by asteroids from space has contributed to the formation of the early evolved crust on Earth that later gave rise to continents - home to human civilization.
Maximizing the potential of MXenes
New research from Drexel University shows how to customize the properties of materials called MXenes, which have displayed exceptional abilities to conduct electricity and block electromagnetic radiation.
Mean streets: Self-driving cars will 'cruise' to avoid paying to park
If you think traffic in city centers is bad now, just wait until self-driving cars emerge on the scene, cruising around to avoid paying hefty downtown parking fees.
Chronic kidney disease: Everyone's concern
850 million people worldwide are affected by kidney disease. This worrying figure was published last June.
Identity crisis of satiety neurons leads to obesity
Obesity -- as research in the past decade has shown -- is first and foremost a brain disease.
When neurons get the blues: Hyperactive brain cells may be to blame when antidepressants don't work
The most commonly prescribed antidepressants, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), lift the fog of depression for many people.
Short anti-rejection therapy protects transplants in diabetic animals
Transplanted pancreatic islets in diabetic animals can survive for a long period of time if the animals are treated with short anti-rejection therapy around the time of the transplant.
Tweaking of hormone-producing cells in the intestine
Researchers from the group of Hans Clevers at the Hubrecht Institute (KNAW) in the Netherlands and their collaborators shed new light on the origin and function of hormone producing cells in the intestine and open new avenues to tweak gut hormone production to treat human disease.
Dynamic aspirin -- molecular vibrations drive electrons over large distances
Aspirin is not only an important drug but also an interesting physics model system in which molecular vibrations and electrons are coupled in a particular way.
Hubble fortuitously discovers a new galaxy in the cosmic neighborhood
Astronomers using the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope to study some of the oldest and faintest stars in the globular cluster NGC 6752 have made an unexpected finding.
Earth's largest extinction event likely took plants first
New evidence from the cliffsides of Australia suggests that Earth's largest extinction event -- a volcanic cataclysm occurring roughly 252 million years ago -- extinguished plant life long before many animal counterparts.
Solving the mystery of Serengeti's vanishing wild dogs
More than 25 years ago, African wild dogs (Lycaon pictus) disappeared from Serengeti National Park.
Hurricane Katrina's aftermath included spike in heart disease hospitalizations
Hospitalizations for cardiovascular disease rose precipitously in Orleans and Jefferson parishes after Hurricane Katrina.
Cells find their identity using a mathematically optimal strategy
Our bodies are made of many different types of cells arranged in a precise spatial pattern that gives rise to properly formed and well-functioning tissues and organs.
Curiosity's first attempt at gravimetry advances martian geology
By cleverly repurposing a device onboard Curiosity normally used to detect the rover's movements on Mars to measure slight variations in gravitational fields instead, researchers have refined the understanding of how Gale crater and the mountain at its center formed.
Nearly half of all adult Americans have cardiovascular disease
At least 48 percent of all adults in the United States have some form of cardiovascular disease, according to the latest statistics provided by the American Heart Association.
Fight or flight: Serotonin neurons prompt brain to make the right call
Known for its role in relieving depression, the neurochemical serotonin may also help the brain execute instantaneous, appropriate behaviors in emergency situations, according to a new Cornell study published Feb.
Climate change could make corals go it alone
Climate change is bad news for coral reefs around the world, with high ocean temperatures causing widespread bleaching events that weaken and kill corals.
Study: Understanding white blood cells' defense mechanisms could lead to better treatments
A laboratory-created microscopic network of fibers helped researchers understand how white blood cells capture and even kill bacteria, offering insight into the effectiveness of antibiotics in the future.
Citizen scientists discover pinhead-sized beetle in Borneo
No more than 10 curious non-professionals with a passion for nature is all it takes to find a new species of minute beetle in the tropical leaf litter, shows a recent expedition to the Ulu Temburong forest in Borneo.
New research uses Curiosity rover to measure gravity on Mars
A team of researchers repurposed navigational sensors aboard NASA's Curiosity rover, enabling the scientists to measure gravity on the lower slopes of Mount Sharp, a peak that rises from the center of Gale Crater.
Large, stable pieces of graphene produced with unique edge pattern
Graphene is a promising material for use in nanoelectronics. Its electronic properties depend greatly, however, on how the edges of the carbon layer are formed.
Skin cancer can spread in mice by hijacking the immune system
Scientists have uncovered molecules released by invasive skin cancer that reprogram healthy immune cells to help the cancer to spread.
Warmer water, chemical exposure influence gene expression across generations in a coastal fish
Warmer water temperatures, combined with low-level exposure to chemicals already known to be harmful to aquatic life, influence the expression of genes in the offspring of an abundant North American fish species -- and threaten organisms whose sex determination is sensitive to water temperature.
Self-growing materials that strengthen in response to force
A strategy inspired by the process responsible for muscle growth could lead to the development of stronger, longer-lasting materials.
Cell lines deserve unique considerations when creating research protections, authors say
New rules recently went into effect, seeking to protect patients who donate tissue samples for research in the age of genetic sequencing.
The development of brain stem cells into new nerve cells and why this can lead to cancer
Stem cells are true Jacks-of-all-trades of our bodies, as they can turn into the many different cell types of all organs.
Learning new vocabulary during deep sleep
Researchers of the University of Bern, Switzerland, showed that we can acquire the vocabulary of a new language during distinct phases of slow-wave sleep and that the sleep-learned vocabulary could be retrieved unconsciously following waking.
How the 2011 riots spread: New evidence shows sense of identity was key
New analysis led by a Sussex psychologist has explained the way in which the 2011 riots spread -- something which may be useful for policy makers in future.
Scientists develop new recycling technology
Scientists of Ural Federal University of Ekaterinburg and Tyumen Industrial University (Russia) have proposed a new method for co-processing organic municipal solid waste (MSW) (food, plastic waste, scrap tires, etc.) with long residuum (tar).
Persistent low body weight in young kids increases risk for anorexia nervosa later
A new study has found that a persistent low body mass index (BMI) in children, starting as young as age 2 for boys and 4 for girls, may be a risk factor for the development of anorexia nervosa in adolescence.
NUS study: Nanoparticles may promote cancer metastasis
Researchers from the National University of Singapore have found that cancer nanomedicine, which are designed to kill cancer cells, may accelerate metastasis.
Immune master regulator orchestrates responses to parasite infection
A new study has identified the master regulator that maintains a healthy gut and limits damage by parasitic whipworms.
Opposite effect: Protein widely known to fight tumors also boosts cancer growth
UC San Diego researchers studying p53, the heralded cancer-fighting 'guardian of the genome,' found that the human protein also plays a role in promoting tumors, in addition to suppressing them.
European waters drive ocean overturning, key for regulating climate
An international study reveals the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation, which helps regulate Earth's climate, is highly variable and primarily driven by the conversion of warm, salty, shallow waters into colder, fresher, deep waters moving south through the Irminger and Iceland basins.
PolyU's nano-encapsulation technology enhances DHA absorption for early brain development
The Hong Kong Polytechnic University (PolyU) today announced the findings on its novel nano-encapsulation technology for optimising the maternal and fetal absorption of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA).
How whipworms wreak havoc on the gut
Signaling through interleukin-10 (IL-10) receptors on gut immune cells plays a critical role in protecting the gut lining and microbiota from disruption caused by whipworms, according to a study published Jan.
Carbon-capture technology scrubs CO2 from power plants like scuba-diving gear
Scientists at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) have developed a process that removes CO2 from coal-burning power plant emissions in a way that is similar to how soda lime works in scuba diving rebreathers.
Bacteria promote lung tumor development, study suggests
MIT cancer biologists have discovered a mechanism that lung tumors exploit to promote their own survival: The tumors alter bacterial populations within the lung, provoking the immune system to create an inflammatory environment that in turn helps the tumor cells to proliferate.
Bitter rapeseed
Rapeseed doesn't just contain oil but high-quality protein, too. However, protein extracts from rapeseed have an intense, bitter off-taste.
Atari master: New AI smashes Google DeepMind in video game challenge
A new breed of algorithms has mastered Atari video games 10 times faster than state-of-the-art AI, with a breakthrough approach to problem solving.
Minority kidney transplants could increase with new option
Kidney transplant recipients are now benefiting from donor organs that do not match their blood type but are compatible and just as safe, according to a Vanderbilt University Medical Center study in the Journal of the American College of Surgeons.
Achieving a balance: Animal welfare and conservation
In a paper recently published in the journal Frontiers in Veterinary Science, a team of researchers, animal care experts and veterinarians evaluate the balance between animal welfare and conservation needs for a number of rare species of native birds being raised in San Diego Zoo Global breeding centers in Hawaii.
Treatment for obesity and fatty liver disease may be in reach
Professor Amiram Goldblum and his team at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem's Institute for Drug Research have discovered 27 new molecules.
Connective tissue on the wrong road -- When organs start to scar
The increased deposition of connective tissue is a problem in chronic diseases of many organs such as the lungs (idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis), liver (cirrhosis), kidneys (kidney fibrosis), gut (graft versus host disease), and the skin (systemic sclerosis).
Commonly used anti-rejection drug could be repurposed to treat some liver cancers
Research in animal models suggest that liver cancers with a mutation in the β-catenin gene could respond to treatment with rapamycin, a commonly used immunosupressant.
New computational method reduces risk of drug formulation
A team of researchers has developed a new method to calculate and predict how drug molecules in molecular crystals arrange themselves under changing energetic conditions.
Male mice hard-wired to recognize sex of other mice, Stanford study finds
A male mouse identifies the sex of an unfamiliar mouse because of hard-wired brain physiology, not previous experience, Stanford University School of Medicine investigators have found.
Graphene crinkles can be used as 'molecular zippers'
New research shows that electrically charged crinkles in layered graphene can be useful in the directed self- assembly of molecules.
To sleep, perchance to heal: Newly discovered gene governs need for slumber when sick
Humans spend nearly one-third of their lives in slumber, yet sleep is still one of biology's most enduring mysteries.
'Working rich' prevail among today's top earners
Many blame idle millionaires for the rise in income inequality, but today's top earners are actually the 'working rich,' according to a new working paper co-authored by Princeton University.
Researchers breathe new life into COPD research using mouse models
Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU) researchers revealed that the immune cells basophils caused emphysema in mice with COPD-like features induced by intranasal administration of elastase.
Effectively collecting tiny droplets for biomedical analysis and beyond
In a single sneeze or a cough, as many as 40,000 tiny droplets are forcibly propelled from our mouth and nose into the air.
Progress with geriatrics legislation highlights collaboration for care as we age
he American Geriatrics Society today offered a ringing endorsement of the bipartisan Geriatrics Workforce Improvement Act, a proposal in the US Senate to ensure communities across the US have access to health professionals and other critical supports improving care for us all as we age.
New knowledge could help predict and prevent depression
In a new study, researchers from the Danish iPSYCH project demonstrate that people with the highest genetic propensity are over two and a half times as likely to be treated in a psychiatric hospital for depression compared to people with the lowest propensity.
First 'OSNAP' results alter understanding of Atlantic overturning circulation variability
Contradicting the prevailing view on what causes major changes to a climate-regulating ocean circulation pattern in the northern hemisphere, the first results from the 'OSNAP' project, an internationally collaborative effort designed to monitor large-scale ocean dynamics, report that deep water formation in the Labrador Sea does not drive Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) variability.
What causes rats without a Y chromosome to become male?
A look at the brains of an endangered spiny rat off the coast of Japan by University of Missouri (MU) Bond Life Sciences Center scientist Cheryl Rosenfeld could illuminate the subtle genetic influences that stimulate a mammal's cells to develop as male versus female in the absence of a Y chromosome.
Mars rover Curiosity makes first gravity-measuring traverse on the Red Planet
A clever use of non-science engineering data from NASA's Mars rover Curiosity has let a team of researchers, including an Arizona State University graduate student, measure the density of rock layers in Gale Crater.
Children exposed to air pollution at school may be at greater risk of overweight and obesity
Exposure to air pollution, particularly at school, could be associated with a higher risk of overweight and obesity during childhood
Genetic testing gives answers on developmental disorders during pregnancy
Genetic testing improves diagnoses of abnormalities in developing babies picked up during ultrasound scans, scientists report today in The Lancet.
Rigs to reefs
Offshore oil platforms have an immense presence, physically, financially and environmentally.
Passing aircraft wring extra snow and rain out of clouds
Planes flying over rain or snow can intensify the precipitation by as much as 10-fold, according to a new study.
New 3D printer shapes objects with rays of light
A new 3D printer uses light to transform gooey liquids into complex solid objects in only a matter of minutes.
Study reveals wildlife is abundant in Chernobyl
A scavenger study that used fish carcasses as bait provides additional evidence that wildlife is abundant in the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone.
Adaptive models capture complexity of the brain and behavior
Scientists reveal rich details of dynamical systems by breaking them down into simpler components which change over time.
Plastic in Britain's seals, dolphins and whales
Microplastics have been found in the guts of every marine mammal examined in a new study of animals washed up on Britain's shores.
Research identifies pathway connecting some ARV drugs with liver disease
Research out of the University of Kentucky has identified a potential pathway by which certain ARV drugs -- commonly given to patients with HIV -- give rise to liver disease.
Estimation of technology level required for low-cost renewable hydrogen production
NIMS, the University of Tokyo and Hiroshima University jointly evaluated the economic efficiency of hydrogen production systems combining photovoltaic power generation and rechargeable batteries and estimated technology levels necessary for the systems to produce hydrogen at a globally competitive cost.
An unexpected mode of action for an antibody
Studies of human monoclonal antibodies isolated from survivors of coronavirus-induced severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) or Middle-East respiratory syndrome (MERS) are unveiling surprising immune defense tactics against fatal viruses.
Medical experts restore movement and autonomic function in patients with complete paralysis
There are more than 290,000 people estimated to be living in the United States with a spinal cord injury.
The Lancet: Statin therapy reduces risk of major cardiovascular events irrespective of age
Statin therapy reduces major vascular events, and a new meta-analysis shows this is the case even in patients over 75 years of age.
Researchers uncover intracellular longevity pathway
Researchers discovered an intracellular pathway that promotes health and longevity in the worm C. elegans.
The search for environmental causes of Parkinson's disease moves forward
Environmental factors are widely believed to play a key role in the development of Parkinson's disease (PD), but little is known about specific environmental triggers.
Survivors of a firearm injury at risk for subsequent hospitalizations
Ten percent of firearm injury survivors will be readmitted to the hospital for further treatment within 90 days of their original injuries.
A new 'twist' on 3D printing renders 'The Thinker,' and other objects
Rotating photosensitive material while exposing it to an evolving light pattern allows for a new type of 3D printing in which printed components can encase other, pre-existing solid objects, researchers report.
Pinpointing the cells that control the brain's memory flow
From the cab driver heading for Times Square to the commuter returning home on the freeway, we all carry maps in our head labeled with important locations.
UMD study finds exercise benefits brains, changes blood flow in older adults
Exercise training alters brain blood flow and improves cognitive performance in older adults, though not in the way you might think.
BDNF-VEGF interplay key to rapid antidepressant actions
A study by researchers at Yale University reveals a complex interplay of two different growth factors in the rapid and long-lasting antidepressant effects of ketamine.
Insecticide resistance genes affect vector competence for West Nile virus
In a context of overuse of insecticides, which leads to the selection of resistant mosquitoes, it is already known that this resistance to insecticides affects interactions between mosquitoes and the pathogens they transmit.
How the fruit fly got its stripes: Researchers explore precision of embryonic development
A team at Princeton found that early steps in fruit fly development occur according to a mathematically optimal process.
Ancient pandas weren't exclusive bamboo eaters, bone evidence suggests
The giant pandas we know and love today live only in the understory of particular mountains in southwestern China, where they subsist on bamboo alone.
Do all chemotherapies have equal long-term heart risk?
Different chemotherapy drugs were associated with varying degrees of long-term risk of cardiomyopathy in survivors of childhood cancers, according to a new study that included a researcher from UT Health San Antonio.
Introducing nemuri, a protein that induces sleep and fights infection
Researchers have discovered a bacteria-fighting peptide in fruit flies that also promotes sleep after sleep deprivation or infection, according to a new study.
When the structure of tunneling nanotubes (TNTs) challenges the very concept of cell
Cells in our bodies have the ability to speak with one another much like humans do.
A new approach to peripheral nerve injury?
The lab of neuroscientist Michael Costigan, Ph.D., at Boston Children's Hospital is studying how the body's immune system breaks down damaged peripheral nerves.
Sleep apnea creates gaps in life memories: Study
Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is estimated to affect over 936 million people worldwide, and people with OSA are known to suffer memory problems and depression.
Scientists shed light on processes behind age-related decline in brain structures
Ageing can cause damage to support cells in the white matter, which in turn may lead to damage in the grey matter of the hippocampus, finds a new study by Cardiff University.
Feeding tubes shouldn't be on POLST forms: JAGS opinion paper
Following years of research that demonstrated feeding tubes can harm patients with dementia, the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society has published an OHSU opinion paper recommending patient preference for feeding tubes be excluded from Physician Order for Life-Sustaining Treatment, or POLST, forms.
UH marine mammal research captures rare video of newborn humpback whale
A rare video, captured by the University of Hawaii at Manoa's Marine Mammal Research Program (MMRP) in January 2019 shows a humpback whale calf so new that its dorsal fin and tail flukes appear soft and flimsy, and its mother is still excreting blood, while sometimes supporting the calf on her back.
Environmentally stable laser emits exceptionally pure light
Researchers have developed a compact laser that emits light with extreme spectral purity that doesn't change in response to environmental conditions.
How the immune system protects us against bowel cancer
Researchers from Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin have discovered a protective mechanism which is used by the body to protect intestinal stem cells from turning cancerous.
More die after surgery than from HIV, TB, and malaria combined -- study
Around the world 4.2 million people die every year within 30 days after surgery -- with half of these deaths occurring in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs), a new study reveals.
Endangered sharks being eaten in UK
Endangered species of hammerhead and dogfish are among the sharks being sold as food in the UK, researchers have revealed.
Researchers discover method to 'turn off' mutated melanoma
Melanoma is the deadliest form of skin cancer and notorious for its resistance to conventional chemotherapy.
Evolution, illustrated
Led by Professor of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology and Molecular and Cellular Biology Hopi Hoekstra, a team of international researchers conducted a years-long study that not only confirmed the intuition that light-colored mice survive better in light-colored habitats, and vice versa for dark-colored mice, but also allowed researchers to pinpoint a mutation related to survival, specifically that affects pigmentation, and understand exactly how the mutation produced a novel coat color.
Rainfall extremes are connected across continents: Nature study
Extreme rainfall events in one city or region are connected to the same kind of events thousands of kilometers away, an international team of experts finds in a study now published in one of the world's leading scientific journals, Nature.
UN University compares technologies that remove arsenic from groundwater
A UN University study compares for the first time the effectiveness and costs of many different technologies designed to remove arsenic from groundwater -- a health threat to at least 140 million people in 50 countries.
Membraneless protocells could provide clues to formation of early life
Membraneless protocells allow RNAs to participate in fundamental chemical reactions, providing clues to early steps in origin of life on earth.
Climate change and infertility -- a ticking time bomb?
Rising temperatures could make some species sterile and see them succumb to the effects of climate change earlier than currently thought, scientists at the University of Liverpool warn.
For older people, medications are common; AGS Beers Criteria aims to make them appropriate, too
The American Geriatrics Society (AGS) today unveiled its latest update to one of geriatrics' most frequently cited reference tools: The AGS Beers Criteria® for Potentially Inappropriate Medication Use in Older Adults.
Imperceptible movements guide juvenile zebra finch song development
New research from Cornell University shows zebra finches engage in socially guided vocal learning, where they learn their songs by watching their mothers' reactions to their immature songs.
In prenatal testing, 'genomics' sometimes sees what genetic tests can't
One of the first large prospective studies of its kind reveals the potential -- and limitations -- of a new form of genetic testing in pregnancy.
Computational algorithm to reduce electromagnetic noise in electronic circuits developed
Two researchers at Osaka University developed an algorithm for numerical calculation of EM noise (interference) in electric circuits.
Salmon populations may adapt their eggs to survive in degraded rivers
A University of Southampton study suggests that the membrane of salmon eggs may evolve to cope with reduced oxygen levels in rivers, thereby helping their embryos to incubate successfully.
Medical cannabis relieves symptoms in children with autism
Overall, after six months of treatment, 30 percent of patients reported a significant improvement, 53.7 percent reported moderate improvement, and only 15 percent had slight or no change.
The 'stuff' of the universe keeps changing
The composition of the universe--the elements that are the building blocks for every bit of matter -- is ever-changing and ever-evolving, thanks to the lives and deaths of stars.
'More work needed' for new IVF technique
Treating male infertility using a new IVF technique called PICSI, which is already offered in some private clinics, does not increase the likelihood of having a baby, according to the results of a randomized controlled trial.
Blood runs deep: Lab blood vessel model sheds light on angiogenesis
Researchers at the University of Tokyo and at CNRS in France revealed the importance of the molecule EGFL7 for angiogenesis and endothelial integrity using an artificially created blood vessel model called a microvessel-on-a-chip.
Waters west of Europe drive ocean overturning circulation, key for regulating climate
A new international study finds that the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (MOC), a deep-ocean process that plays a key role in regulating Earth's climate, is primarily driven by cooling waters west of Europe.
Discovery points to innovative new way to treat Duchenne muscular dystrophy
Researchers at The Ottawa Hospital and the University of Ottawa have discovered a new way to treat the loss of muscle function caused by Duchenne muscular dystrophy in animal models of the disease.
Stem cell growth accelerated by tropoelastin protein
Tropoelastin, the raw material used to create 'MeTro' elastic surgical glue developed with the University of Sydney, has been found to encourage stem cell growth -- with the potential to ultimately help the body repair itself.
Educated migrants bring wages closer together in regions
Experts from the Higher School of Economics have determined that domestic migration increases the speed at which Russia's regions approach one another in terms of salary levels.
How new species emerge
International research team reconstructs the evolutionary history of baboons.
Male birth control for the malaria parasite
Disrupting two genes involved in the preservation of RNA molecules inhibits the ability of the male form of the malaria parasite to mature and be transmitted from human blood into mosquitoes, interrupting a key stage in the parasite's life-cycle and cutting off an important step in the spread of the disease.
Can the eye help achieve islet transplant tolerance in type 1 diabetes?
Diabetes Research Institute scientists show in experimental and preclinical recipients that islets transplanted in the eye can survive and function long-term without continuous immunosuppression, and, moreover, that initial islet transplants within the eye may lead to long-term peripheral immune tolerance to islets in other transplant sites.

Top Science Podcasts

We have hand picked the top science podcasts of 2019.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Risk
Why do we revere risk-takers, even when their actions terrify us? Why are some better at taking risks than others? This hour, TED speakers explore the alluring, dangerous, and calculated sides of risk. Guests include professional rock climber Alex Honnold, economist Mariana Mazzucato, psychology researcher Kashfia Rahman, structural engineer and bridge designer Ian Firth, and risk intelligence expert Dylan Evans.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#540 Specialize? Or Generalize?
Ever been called a "jack of all trades, master of none"? The world loves to elevate specialists, people who drill deep into a single topic. Those people are great. But there's a place for generalists too, argues David Epstein. Jacks of all trades are often more successful than specialists. And he's got science to back it up. We talk with Epstein about his latest book, "Range: Why Generalists Triumph in a Specialized World".
Now Playing: Radiolab

Dolly Parton's America: Neon Moss
Today on Radiolab, we're bringing you the fourth episode of Jad's special series, Dolly Parton's America. In this episode, Jad goes back up the mountain to visit Dolly's actual Tennessee mountain home, where she tells stories about her first trips out of the holler. Back on the mountaintop, standing under the rain by the Little Pigeon River, the trip triggers memories of Jad's first visit to his father's childhood home, and opens the gateway to dizzying stories of music and migration. Support Radiolab today at Radiolab.org/donate.