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Science Current Events and Science News | Brightsurf | February 06, 2019


Micromotors deliver oral vaccines
Vaccines have saved millions of lives, but nobody likes getting a shot.
Major tobacco companies pay almost no corporation tax despite massive profits
Taxes on the profits of big tobacco in the UK are being applied in a 'wholly inadequate' way claim the authors of a new study.
'Doing science,' rather than 'being scientists,' more encouraging to girls
Asking young girls to 'do science' leads them to show greater persistence in science activities than does asking them to 'be scientists,' finds a new psychology study by researchers at New York University and Princeton University.
Do differences in gait predict the risk of developing depression in later life?
Older people who were newly diagnosed with depression had a slower walking speed and a shorter step length compared with those without depression in a recent Journal of the American Geriatrics Society study.
Endocannabinoid system, a target to improve cognitive disorders in models of Down syndrome
A study by the Neuropharmacology Laboratory-NeuroPhar of the Department of Experimental and Health Sciences (DCEXS) at UPF reveals the involvement of the endocannabinoid system in cognitive disorders in mouse models of Down syndrome.
Fractures have long-term impacts on quality of life in older people
Single and multiple hip, vertebral, and rib fractures strongly affect the quality of life of older adults over a prolonged period of time, according to a new study published in the Journal of Bone and Mineral Research.
Combination treatment, diabetes drug and immunotherapy, may help to fight breast cancer
Researchers in Finland have discovered a drug combination that collaborates with the cancer cells' own MYC oncoprotein, which in large quantities causes self-destruction of the cancer cells.
The interplay between relationships, stress, and sleep
A new Personal Relationships study documents how the quality of a person's romantic relationship and the life stress he or she experiences at two key points in early adulthood (at age 23 and 32) are related to sleep quality and quantity in middle adulthood (at age 37).
Bubbles of brand new stars
This dazzling region of newly forming stars in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) was captured by the Multi Unit Spectroscopic Explorer instrument (MUSE) on ESO's Very Large Telescope.
Researchers find new treatment for Chlamydia
Researchers at the University of Waterloo have developed a new way to prevent and treat Chlamydia, the most common sexually transmitted bacterial infection in the world.
Cracks herald the calving of a large iceberg from Petermann Glacier
Cracks in the floating ice tongue of Petermann Glacier in the far northwest reaches of Greenland indicate the pending loss of another large iceberg.
Workplace sexism's effects on women's mental health and job satisfaction
A new Journal of Applied Social Psychology study investigates the associations between workplace sexism, sense of belonging at work, mental health, and job satisfaction for women in male-dominated industries.
Study estimates misuse of prescribed opioids in the United States
A new Pharmacoepidemiology & Drug Safety study estimates the prevalence and risk factors for self-reported misuse of prescribed opioids in the general adult population.
Financial relationships and prescribing practices between physicians and drug companies
In a study published in The Oncologist, physicians treating certain cancers who consistently received payments from a cancer drug's manufacturer were more likely to prescribe that drug over alternative treatments.
Escort service: The role of immune cells in the formation of metastases
Tumor cells use a certain type of immune cells, the so-called neutrophils, to enhance their ability to form metastases.
Diabetes drug impacts gut microbiome
Acarbose, a drug commonly used to treat type 2 diabetes, can change the gut microbiome in a reversible and diet-dependent manner, according to new research published in the journal mSphere.
A hidden route for fatty acids can make cancers resistant to therapy
Researchers from the lab of Prof. Sarah-Maria Fendt at the VIB-KU Leuven Center for Cancer Biology now demonstrate that certain tumor cells use an alternative -- previously unexplored -- pathway to produce fatty acids.
More physical than chemical: Researchers show what really gets cells going
Collective cell migration is essential in many organisms, with roles in human cellular processes including cancer invasion and wound healing.
New therapy for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis successfully tested on mice
A team from Université Laval and the CERVO Brain Research Centre has demonstrated the efficacy in mice of a new therapy that addresses the main manifestation of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS).
Interactive websites may cause antismoking messages to backfire
Health communicators should carefully choose interactive features for their websites because tools that can make some websites more engaging for some audiences could actually discourage other users from adopting healthy behaviors, according to researchers.
'Virtual pharmacology' advance tackles universe of unknown drugs
Scientists at UC San Francisco, in collaboration with colleagues at the University of North Carolina (UNC), have developed the world's largest virtual pharmacology platform and shown it is capable of identifying extremely powerful new drugs.
A scientific study reveals the enigmas on social behaviour of western lowland gorillas
A new study reveals one of the enigmas related to the social behaviour of the western lowland gorilla (Gorilla gorilla gorilla) in the heart of the African equatorial rainforest. hese primates show a dynamic social structure -- individuals change frequently between families -- with a high degree of tolerance and peaceful coexistence among the members.
Tree loss from bark-beetle infestation impacts elk habitat
Although elk typically adapt to forest disturbances such as forest fires and logging, a new Journal of Wildlife Management study found that during the summer, elk avoided areas with extensive tree mortality that has occurred due to the bark-beetle epidemic in the northern portions of the Rocky Mountains in the United States.
Stock market shows greater reaction to forecasts by analysts with favorable surnames
Financial analysts whose surnames are perceived as favorable elicit stronger market reactions to their earnings forecasts, new research from Cass Business School has found.
When does noise become a meaningful message?
Background noise is usually regarded as a nuisance that masks important sounds.
New music styles: How the challenger calls the tune
A research team including two members of the Complexity Science Hub Vienna found that fashion cycles in music are driven by outsider groups.
Massive collision in the planetary system Kepler 107
Two of the planets which are orbiting the star Kepler 107 could be the result of an impact similar to that which affected the Earth to produce the moon.
Intense IV blood sugar control doesn't improve stroke outcomes
Intense IV insulin is not better than standard insulin shots at improving stroke recovery.
High-need, high-cost patients offer solutions for improving their care and reducing costs
By many estimates, only 5 percent of US patients are high-need, high-cost (HNHC), yet they account for about 50 percent of health care spending.
To conserve energy, AI clears up cloudy forecasts
A new approach developed by Fengqi You, professor in energy systems engineering at Cornell University, predicts the accuracy of the weather forecast using a machine learning model trained with years' worth of data on forecasts and actual weather conditions.
Male Y chromosomes not 'genetic wastelands'
Researchers from the University of Rochester have found a way to sequence a large portion of the Y chromosome in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster--the most that the Y chromosome has been assembled in fruit flies.
Mental illness not to blame for gun violence study finds
Counter to a lot of public opinion, having a mental illness does not necessarily make a person more likely to commit gun violence.
Microbial manufacturing
Led by Emily Balskus, Professor of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, a team of researchers has untangled how bacteria found in soil are able to manufacture streptozotocin, showing for the first time that the compound is produced through an enzymatic pathway and revealing the novel chemistry that drives the process.
Are most patients with fibromyalgia misdiagnosed?
Recent studies have suggested that most people who have been diagnosed with fibromyalgia by physicians may not actually have the condition.
Gypsum as an agricultural product
Gypsum, a source of calcium and sulfur, can benefit crops and soils.
Absentmindedness points to earlier warning signs of silent strokes among people at risk
Adults who notice that they frequently lose their train of thought or often become sidetracked may in fact be displaying earlier symptoms of cerebral small vessel disease, otherwise known as a 'silent stroke,' suggests a recent study.
Citizen science projects have a surprising new partner -- the computer
Data scientists and citizen science experts partnered with ecologists who often study wildlife populations by deploying camera traps.
2018 fourth warmest year in continued warming trend, according to NASA, NOAA
Earth's global surface temperatures in 2018 were the fourth warmest since 1880, according to independent analyses by NASA and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).
Greater efforts needed to address cancer therapies' effects on bone health
A new British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology review examines the impact of cancer therapies on the skeleton and how to limit bone loss and fractures in cancer patients treated with these therapies.
NASA catches development of Tropical Cyclone Gelena
Visible-light imagery from NASA's Aqua satellite revealed the development of Tropical Depression 13S into a tropical storm.
Children with diabetes perform well in school
On average, Danish children suffering from type 1 diabetes perform just as well in school as their classmates.
Six new species of hideously adorable tentacle-nosed catfish discovered in Amazon
Scientists just discovered six new species of bristlenose catfish in the Amazon.
Certain characteristics linked with depression before and after giving birth
Depression during pregnancy and following childbirth (perinatal depression) is a common and potentially severe condition.
OU study finds insects crave salt and search grasslands for the limiting nutrient
A University of Oklahoma team from the Geographical Ecology Group has published a new study in the journal Ecology on the nutritional preferences of diverse insect communities from Texas to Minnesota.
Competent chimpanzee nutcrackers
Humans are considered to be superior tool users and uniquely able to teach skills to apprentices.
Touch biographies reveal transgenerational nature of touch
The way we feel about being touched -- and the way we touch others -- are shaped by our personal and generational affective history.
An elegant mechanism
Researchers discovered a connection between metabolite and protein transport in the powerhouse of the cell.
Ambulance nitroglycerin patch to lower blood pressure did not improve stroke outcomes
Despite the promise of earlier small studies, a patch to lower stroke patient's blood pressure before reaching the hospital didn't improve stroke outcomes.
Millions of tons of plastic waste could be turned into clean fuels, other products
A new chemical conversion process could transform the world's polyolefin waste, a form of plastic, into useful products, such as clean fuels and other items.
Nullifying protein YTHDF1 enhances anti-tumor response
Identifying molecular pathways that boost the immune response to tumor neoantigens opens up new ways to develop and amplify cancer immunotherapy.
Being kind to yourself has mental and physical benefits, research shows
Taking time to think kind thoughts about yourself and loved ones has psychological and physical benefits, new research suggests.
See-through fish aid scientists in autism-related breakthrough
University of Miami researchers have discovered a clue in the humble zebrafish's digestive tract that, one day, could help people on the autism spectrum alleviate one of the most common yet least studied symptoms of their disorder: gastrointestinal distress.
Maternal depression and natural disaster-related stress may affect infants' temperament
A new Infant Mental Health Journal study demonstrates that prenatal maternal depression has important consequences for infant temperament.
Study examines race-based differences in social support needs among breast cancer patients
In a Psycho-Oncology study of 28 women who were being treated for breast cancer and were participating in focus groups, White participants noted that having other breast cancer survivors in their support network was essential for meeting their social support needs.
Study links adult fibromyalgia to childhood sexual abuse
A new Tel Aviv University study finds that fibromyalgia syndrome -- a chronic condition characterized by widespread pain, fatigue and cognitive difficulties -- may be a consequence of post-traumatic physical and psychological distress associated with childhood sexual abuse.
How landscape plants have an impact on the carbon footprint
A new study provides a base of understanding of carbon footprint terminology and illustrates carbon footprint analyses using data from previous research that modeled nursery and greenhouse crop production systems and their life-cycle impact.
NSAID impairs immune response in heart failure, worsens heart and kidney damage
Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, or NSAIDs, are widely known as pain-killers and can relieve pain and inflammation.
New welfare tool to help improve the lives of elephants in human care
Zoos and safari parks in the UK are using a special new tool to help them more successfully monitor the wellbeing of elephants in their care, thanks to a study led by The University of Nottingham.
Cilostazol-combo antiplatelet therapy reduced risk for recurrent stroke
The long-term combination of cilostazol with aspirin or clopidogrel resulted in fewer recurrent strokes than with aspirin or clopidogrel alone in high-risk patients.
Scientists seeking to regrow kidneys make promising discovery
Scientists seeking to regrow damaged kidneys have discovered that blocked kidneys in newborns have a remarkable ability to repair themselves after the obstruction is removed.
Controllable electron flow in quantum wires
A team has found they can turn on and off the flow of current in a bismuth crystal subjected to a high magnetic field, making a new type of controllable quantum wire.
Morals versus money: How we make social decisions
Our actions are guided by moral values. However, monetary incentives can get in the way of our good intentions.
Association between EMS response time and motor vehicle crash mortality
Motor vehicle crashes are a leading cause of death and injury in the United States. Emergency medical service (EMS) response time is a factor with the potential to influence survival.  This study examined EMS response times to motor vehicle crashes in nearly 2,300 US counties from 2013 to 2015.
Scientists to create new 'chemical noses' to rid the environment of industrial pollutants
Scientists from five European countries have joined forces to develop next-generation 'chemical noses' to remove industrial pollutants from the environment.
Expand the role of patients, the true experts, in neuromuscular disease research
The old-fashioned paternalistic relationship between doctors and patients has gradually evolved into a more collaborative one in the era of patient-centered medicine.
The silence of sickle cell disease
Silent strokes are a common symptom of sickle cell disease, though they can be debilitating.
When the insurance company monitors your driving in real time does it help?
A new study in the INFORMS journal Marketing Science finds that the auto insurance industry's Usage-Based Insurance (UBI) approach, which uses on-board technology to report drivers' real time driving behavior, benefits both the motorist and the insurer.
Research explains how snakes lost their limbs
The study is part of an effort to understand how changes in the genome lead to changes in phenotypes.
A very small number of crops are dominating globally. That's bad news for sustainable agriculture
A new U of T study finds that globally we're growing more of the same kinds of crops, and this presents major challenges for agricultural sustainability on a global scale.
First look: Chang'e lunar landing site
On Jan. 30, NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter caught views of the Chinese Chang'e 4 lander on the floor of the Moon's Von Kármán crater.
'Twilight Zone' could help preserve shallow water reefs
Corals lurking in deeper, darker waters could one day help to replenish shallow water reefs under threat from ocean warming and bleaching events, according to researchers.
Hibernating hamsters could provide new clues to Alzheimer's disease
Syrian hamsters are golden-haired rodents often kept as house pets.
Study examines association between birth weight, risk of developing psychiatric disorders in adulthood
It is unclear if the associations between fetal growth as indicated by birth weight and later mental health conditions remain after taking into account family-related factors that could affect these conditions.
Study confirms beaked whales' incredible diving abilities
A Duke-led study provides the first record of the diving behavior of Cuvier's beaked whales in US Atlantic waters.
Excessive weight gain in early childhood affects teenage heart health
Excessive weight gain in children under two years can lead to cardiovascular and metabolic risk factors in teenage years including increased cholesterol, being overweight and having fat around the middle, finds new research from the University of Sydney.
Forecast suggests Earth's warmest period on record
The forecast for the global average surface temperature for the five-year period to 2023 is predicted to be near or above 1.0 °C above pre-industrial levels, says the Met Office.
Climate modeling shows significant shifts in 21st century Pacific Northwest coastal forests
A changing climate in the 21st century will significantly alter the coastal forests of the Pacific Northwest, according to researchers at Oregon State University.
NASA looks at Tropical Storm Funani's rainfall
Tropical Storm Funani (formerly classified as 12S) continued to affect Rodrigues Island in the South Pacific Ocean when the GPM satellite passed overhead and analyzed its rainfall.
Melting ice sheets may cause 'climate chaos' according to new modelling
The weather these days is wild and will be wilder still within a century.
Electron-gun simulations explain the mechanisms of high-energy cosmic rays
A new study published in EPJ D provides a rudimentary model for simulating cosmic rays' collisions with planets by looking at the model of electrons detached from a negative ion using photons.
Sharp bends make rivers wander
Left to their own devices and given enough time, rivers wander, eroding their banks and leaving their old channels behind.
Mega docking library poised to speed drug discovery
Researchers have launched an ultra-large virtual docking library expected to grow to more than 1 billion molecules by next year.
Climate change poses greater risk of mental health challenges for children born to depressed mothers
Climate change poses an exponentially greater risk for mental health problems in children born to mothers with prenatal depression who also experience natural disaster-related stress.
New physical effect demonstrated by University of Bath scientists after 40 year search
A new physical effect has been demonstrated at the University of Bath after 40 years of pursuit by physicists around the world, which could lead to advancements in chemical manufacturing efficiency, miniaturization and quality control in personalized pharmaceuticals.
Impact of acne relapses on quality of life and productivity
In a study of teenagers and adults suffering from acne who consulted their dermatologist, the acne relapse rate was 44 percent (39.9 percent of ≤20-year-olds and 53.3 percent of >20-year-olds).
Heavy drinking in teens causes lasting changes in emotional center of brain
Lasting changes in the brain caused by drinking that starts in adolescence are the result of epigenetic changes that alter the expression of a protein crucial for the formation and maintenance of neural connections in the amygdala -- the part of the brain involved in emotion, fear and anxiety.
Researchers reveal prostate tumors 'fed' by fatty acids
An international multidisciplinary study initiated by Melbourne scientists has shown a link between prostate cancer and the uptake of fatty acids by cancer cells.
Fate of the subducted oceanic crust revealed by laboratory experiments
Laboratory experiments at extreme pressures and temperatures lead to precise measurements of the sound velocity of CaSiO3 perovskite which is one of the important constituent minerals in the Earth's mantle.
Humans' meat consumption pushing Earth's biggest fauna toward extinction
At least 200 species of large animals are decreasing in number and more than 150 are under threat of extinction, according to new research that suggests humans' meat consumption habits are primarily to blame.
The black storks in Estonia are suffering from loneliness
One-third of the nests of the black stork in Estonia are inhabited by single birds who cannot breed due to lack of partner.
Side-effects not fully reported in more than 30 percent of healthcare reviews
The potential side-effects of health interventions were not fully reported in more than a third of published health study reviews, research at the University of York has shown.
Artificial intelligence can identify microscopic marine organisms
Researchers have developed an artificial intelligence (AI) program that can automatically provide species-level identification of microscopic marine organisms.
How fibrosis develops in butterfly syndrome patients
Researchers have pinpointed how fibrosis develops in butterfly syndrome patients.
Physicists take big step in nanolaser design
Constant question: nanolaser or just simple LED? Physicists from MIPT have developed a method that will help you to find at what circumstances nanolasers qualify as true lasers bypassing technically challenging direct coherence measurements.
How one gene in a tiny fish may alter an aquatic ecosystem
Variations in a single gene in a tiny fish alter how they interact with their environment, according to research led by the University of Pennsylvania's Seth Rudman, a postdoctoral researcher.
Symmetry, a resource that children spontaneously use to draw the plant world
Children love to draw and when they draw they portray the reality they see and know.
More than enough on our plates
Researchers led by Newcastle University have worked with independent retailers in the take- away sector to try and make food healthier -- in the first instance working with independent fish and chip shops.
Fewer deaths seen among young adults who got extra adult support as suicidal teens
Building a circle of trusted adults around a suicidal teen, to support them during vulnerable times, may have long-term effects that reduce their risk of dying young, a new study suggests.
Brain patterns indicative of consciousness, in unconscious individuals
Amid longstanding difficulties distinguishing consciousness in humans in unconscious states, scientists report fMRI-based evidence of distinct patterns of brain activity they say can differentiate between consciousness or unconsciousness.
Japanese study finds concerning trends in cervical cancer and treatment response
Osaka University-centered research examined a large-scale Japanese data cohort for trends in cervical cancer prevalence, treatment, and survival.
In their DNA: Rotator cuff stem cells more likely to develop into fat cells
Why are fat deposits more likely to occur after tears of the shoulder's rotator cuff, compared to other types of muscle injuries?
UNH research finds shrinking population in more than a third of rural counties
Nearly 35 percent of rural counties in the United States are experiencing protracted and significant population loss, according to new research released by the Carsey School of Public Policy at the University of New Hampshire.
What can worms tell us about human aging?
What can worms tell us about human aging? A lot more than you'd think; researchers have developed a single agreed model of metabolic flux in a tiny worm called C. elegans, and Babraham Institute researchers have optimized this model to understand more about the link between metabolism and aging.
Researchers investigate a billion years of coexistence between plants and fungi
What can a billion years of coexistence tell us about the evolution of plants and fungi?
Smart lighting control systems can mean a saving of 400€ a year in the electricity bill
A group of researchers have developed a predictive method for quantifying, by means of simulations of new dynamic metrics, the potential energy and economic saving that using smart lighting control systems brings.
Voluntary control of brainwaves in deep brain of patients with Parkinson's disease
A study group at Osaka University developed a neurofeedback system which enables patients with Parkinson's disease to voluntarily control beta waves in their deep brain associated with symptoms of the disorder.
How does the Amazon rain forest cope with drought?
The Amazon rain forest isn't necessarily a place that many would associate with a drought, yet prolonged dry spells are projected to become more prevalent and severe because of climate change.
Shedding light on zebrafish daily rhythms: Clock gene functions revealed
Researchers at Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU) used zebrafish to study the effects of knocking out three clock genes, Cry1a, Cry2a, and Per2.
Solving a mystery: A new model for understanding how certain nuclei split
Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology have extended an existing mathematical model so that it can be used to more accurately predict the products of fission reactions.
New VaxArray publication on influenza neuraminidase quantification
InDevR Inc. announced publication of 'A Neuraminidase Potency Assay for Quantitative Assessment of Neuraminidase in Influenza Vaccines' in npj Vaccines.
Study shows that Vikings enjoyed a warmer Greenland
After reconstructing southern Greenland's climate record over the past 3,000 years, a Northwestern University team found that it was relatively warm when the Norse lived there between 985 and 1450 C.E., compared to the previous and following centuries.
New technology helps address big problems for small satellites
The small size and relatively low cost of CubeSats have made them a popular choices for commercial launches in recent years, but the process to propel such satellites in space comes with a number of problems.
Female manakins use male mating call when implanted with male hormones
Among golden-collared manakins, a bird found only in Panama and western Colombia, males emit a particular mating call, the 'chee-poo', to attract females.
Do microplastics harm humans?
About 8 million metric tons of plastic waste winds up in the oceans every year -- bottles, bags and doo-dads that eventually break down into tiny pieces, called microplastics.
The good and evil of ghosts, governments, and machines
Perceptions of morality in non-people to be discussed at Society for Personality and Social Psychology Annual Convention in Portland, Oregon.
Manure injection offers hope, challenge for restoring Chesapeake water quality
Widespread adoption by dairy farmers of injecting manure into the soil instead of spreading it on the surface could be crucial to restoring Chesapeake Bay water quality, according to researchers who compared phosphorus runoff from fields treated by both methods.
Diffusing the methane bomb: We can still make a difference
The Arctic is warming twice as fast as the rest of the planet, causing the carbon containing permafrost that has been frozen for tens or hundreds of thousands of years to thaw and release methane into the atmosphere, thereby contributing to global warming.
UNH research pulls back the veil on historical portrayal of 'Downton Abbey'
A historian at the University of New Hampshire takes a closer look at the beloved show 'Downton Abbey' to reveal that it may have been preserving history not as it actually was but as fans believe it ought to have been.
'Unclonable' tag combats counterfeiters
Discovering that your new designer handbag or gold watch is a fake is costly and annoying, and counterfeit medical devices or drugs could have even more serious consequences.
Intuition and failure as valuable ingredients in chemical research
Researchers from the lab of NCCR MARVEL's deputy director Berend Smit and colleagues have developed a methodology for collecting the lessons learned from partially failed trials and incorrect hypotheses -- the experiments that didn't work.
Body building supplement could be bad for the brain
L-norvaline is an ingredient widely used in body building supplements and is promoted as a compound that can boost workouts and aid recovery.
Vitamin D helps treat lethal drug-resistant TB
Vitamin D has been found to speed up the clearance of tuberculosis (TB) bacteria from the lungs of people with multi-drug resistant TB, according to a study of 1,850 patients receiving antibiotic treatment, led by Queen Mary University of London.
HIV drug could treat Alzheimer's, age-associated disorders
Research led by Brown found that blocking retrotransposon activity with a generic HIV/AIDS medication significantly reduces age-related inflammation in old mice and senescent human cells, providing hope for treating age-associated disorders.
New study examines the way estrogen affects methamphetamine addiction
MUSC researchers look at how methamphetamine affects female rats in a new study published January 10 eNeuro.
Review finds antibiotic development increased, but insufficient
While the pipeline of new antibiotics has improved over the past six years, momentum in the development of new infection-fighting agents remains inadequate and could take a significant downturn without new incentives, a report released in Clinical Infectious Diseases shows.
Two studies reveal pregnant women bear greater risk of hemorrhagic stroke
Pregnant women face a much greater risk of having a fatal, but less common, type of stroke caused by bleeding into the brain, according to results of two studies presented by the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston at the International Stroke Conference 2019.
Atomic-scale simulation of antiarrhythmic drug interaction with cardiac cells
Thanks to several technological breakthroughs and an increasing number of available high-resolution structures of ion channels, UC Davis Health researchers have built a model of the human NaV channel that enables them to study drug interactions on heart cells at atomic resolution.
Developed self-controlling 'smart' fuel cell electrode material
A research team led by Professor Kang Taek Lee in the Department of Energy Science and Engineering developed electrode material for a new form of high-performance solid oxide fuel cell.
SUTD researchers developed new methods to create microfluidic devices with fluoropolymers
Researchers from SUTD developed a new rapid prototyping technique for fluoropolymer microfluidic device.

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