Nav: Home

Science Current Events and Science News | Brightsurf | February 07, 2019


A simulator allows patients to experiment how their vision will improve before surgery
For the first time, patients will be able to experience how their vision will improve after a cataract surgery just before being operated.
Researchers develop prostate cancer prediction tool that has unmatched accuracy
Researchers from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and Keck School of Medicine at the University of Southern California have developed a novel machine-learning framework that distinguishes between low- and high-risk prostate cancer with more precision than ever before.
Scientists discover new type of self-healing material
A research group from RIKEN and Kyushu University has developed a new type of material, based on ethylene, which exhibits a number of useful properties such as self-healing and shape memory.
Circular RNA holds promise as cancer biomarker
Researchers at the University of Michigan Rogel Cancer Center have cataloged circular RNA in multiple cancers and conducted initial research that suggests these stable structures could serve as cancer biomarkers in blood or urine.
The novel method Nested CRISPR enables efficient genome editing using long DNA fragments
The group of Dr. Cerón at IDIBELL used the model organism Caenorhabditis elegans to optimize the technique, leading to the development of the method called Nested CRISPR.
Time-shift TV does not reduce amount of live TV, ads consumers watch
A new study looked at whether time-shift television, a technology that allows people to watch TV shows they missed without presetting devices to record content, has affected how people watch TV.
Addressing cooling needs and energy poverty targets in the Global South
With most of the northern hemisphere currently in the icy grip of one of the coldest winters ever recorded, in the south, it is record-breaking heat that is the problem.
Study reveals the hidden contributions of women to a branch of science
A new study by San Francisco State University researchers shows that it's possible to reveal women's once-hidden scientific work by analyzing decades-old research papers in the field of theoretical population biology.
Therapy derived from parasitic worms downregulates proinflammatory pathways
A therapy derived from the eggs of parasitic worms helps to protect against one of chemotherapy's debilitating side effects by significantly downregulating major proinflammatory pathways, reducing inflammation.
Erenumab in migraine: Indication of considerable added benefit for certain patients
The first drug of a new drug class can reduce the number of headache days if other prophylactic medications have failed or have not been an option.
High-risk sexually transmitted HPV virus associated with increased CVD risk
Infection with high-risk strains of the human papillomavirus (HPV), which have been linked to cancer, might increase the risk of heart and blood vessel or cardiovascular disease, especially among women with obesity or other cardiovascular risk factors.
Simple drug combination creates new neurons from neighboring cells
A simple combination of molecules converts cells neighboring damaged neurons into functional new neurons, which could potentially be used to treat stroke, Alzheimer's disease, and brain injuries.
Evolution: Larger datasets unravel deep roots
Comparative genome content analyses provide insight into the early evolution of animals.
Safe to use hands-free devices in the car? Yes, according to research
New research suggests that drivers who use hands-free electronic devices, as opposed to handheld ones, are less likely to get into a crash.
Normal brain aging patterns occur at a faster rate in people with psychosis
Patients with psychosis have accelerated aging of two brain networks important for general cognition -- the frontoparietal network (FPN) and cingulo-opercular network (CON) -- according to a new study in Biological Psychiatry.
Periodic table still influencing today's research
This year marks the 150th anniversary of the Periodic Table, and the principles that drove Dmitri Mendeleev to construct his table are still influencing today's research advances.
Scientists discover new type of magnet
A team of scientists has discovered the first robust example of a new type of magnet -- one that holds promise for enhancing the performance of data storage technologies.
Improving the body's ability to fight cancer and intruders
Individualized cancer therapies are improved, thanks to two new methods for characterizing the immune system.
Researchers pinpoint promising approach for analyzing atmospheric particles from space
A new analysis has revealed that advanced satellite-based instrument capabilities are needed for global monitoring of microscopic particles, or aerosols, in the stratospheric layer of the atmosphere.
Earliest known seed-eating perching bird discovered in Fossil Lake, Wyoming
The 'perching birds,' or passerines, are the most common birds in the world today -- they include sparrows, robins, and finches.
How a telenovela was adapted for US audiences: With more sex, violence and alcohol
Given the increasing depiction of sex, violence and alcohol use in US media over recent decades, researchers sought to learn if such a 'culture of corruption' would influence an American adaptation of a TV show that originated as Spanish-language telenovela.
Zwicky Transient Facility nabs several supernovae a night
New discoveries from the Zwicky Transient Facility include exploding stars, near-Earth asteroids, and more.
Smartphone use risks eye examination misdiagnosis
Clinicians who use smartphones to capture photographs of patients' eyes risk misdiagnosis if they base their decisions on objective data extracted from non-calibrated cameras.
Fair treatment by supermarkets key to suppliers' performance
Small suppliers who believe they are fairly treated by big supermarkets will put more resources into their relationship with buyers and perform better, according to academics at the University of East Anglia (UEA).
Intensive blood pressure lowering safe for clot-buster-treated stroke patients, but...
Rapidly lowering blood pressure beyond recommended targets safely reduced the risk of bleeding as a side effect in stroke patients but did not limit post-stroke disability.
Why forgetting at work can be a good thing
Psychologists and information scientists at the University of Münster have looked at how digital information systems support daily work and why it can be a good for us to forget certain things.
Do cold temperatures result in heat-of-the-moment purchases?
In 2005, the New York Times reported that high end retailer Bergdorf Goodman kept its stores chilled to 68.3 degrees, whereas Old Navy's was kept at a balmy 80.3.
CABI helps map ferocious speed and likely cause of woody weed spread across Ethiopia
CABI scientists have helped map the ferocious speed and probable cause of a devastating spread of the invasive alien tree Prosopis juliflora (Swartz DC) across an area equivalent to half of neighboring Djibouti in the Afar Region of northeastern Ethiopia.
The involvement of the gut in Parkinson's disease: hype or hope?
There is growing evidence that at least in some patients with Parkinson's disease (PD), the disease may begin in the gut.
Interdisciplinary approach the only way to address devastating effects of soil erosion
A major international study led by the University of Plymouth has shown that traditional pastoralist communities -- such as the Maasai in East Africa -- are abundantly aware that climate change and intensive grazing are having a marked effect on the resources they rely on for survival.
Immunotherapy appears better than chemotherapy for aggressive type of skin cancer
The first study of the immunotherapy drug pembrolizumab as the initial treatment for patients with a rare but aggressive form of skin cancer known as Merkel cell carcinoma reports better responses and longer survival than expected with conventional chemotherapy.
Study finds experimental extreme draining of reservoir has unexpected ecological impacts
The experimental extreme draining of a reservoir in Oregon to aid downstream migration of juvenile chinook salmon is showing benefits but also a mix of unintended consequences, including changing the aquatic food web and releasing potential predators downstream.
Study shows unusual microbes hold clues to early life
A new study has revealed how a group of deep-sea microbes provides clues to the evolution of life on Earth, according to a recent paper in The ISME Journal.
New 'Trojan horse' cancer treatment shows early promise in multiple tumor types
A brand new type of cancer drug that acts as a 'Trojan horse' to get inside tumor cells has shown promise in patients with six different cancer types.
Could theatre be way forward in communicating conservation messages?
Theatre performances in zoos can be effective in increasing knowledge of important conservation messages, a study at the University of York has revealed.
Blood leukocytes mirror insufficient sleep
Prior studies have indicated that prolonged insufficient sleep and poor sleep quality are associated with a heightened risk of cardiovascular diseases, dementia and psychiatric disorders.
Aspirin to prevent colon cancer underutilized in high-risk patients
The US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) concluded that aspirin reduces the risk of colorectal cancer by 40 percent as well as recurrence of advanced polyps, which are a major risk factor.
Folliculin mutations disrupt embryo implantation
New information is unfolding on the genetic controls of an early turning point in pregnancy -- the changes in an embryo's cells that occur as it prepares to lodge in the wall of the uterus.
RNAs play key role in protein aggregation and in neurodegenerative disease
New research reveals RNAs, which are crucial for cells to produce proteins, are also involved in protein aggregation, where proteins do not fold properly and 'clump' together into aggregates.
Hispanic men most likely to have fatal interaction with police in segregated neighborhoods
Hispanic males were two times more likely to have a fatal interaction with the police in neighborhoods that have a high percentage of Hispanic residents -- and police agencies with more Hispanic officers were associated with higher odds of Hispanic fatalities.
Unleashing perovskites' potential for solar cells
Researchers have been able to decipher a key aspect of the behavior of perovskites made with different formulations: With certain additives there is a kind of 'sweet spot' where greater amounts will enhance performance and beyond which further amounts begin to degrade it.
Aggressive clearance key to best outcome after a brain hemorrhage
When a patient has an intracerebral hemorrhage, surgeons need to remove at least 70 percent of it to reach a meaningful recovery.
HPV infection may be behind rise in vocal-cord cancers among young nonsmokers
A Massachusetts General Hospital research team finds evidence that the remarkable recent increase in vocal-cord cancer in young adults appears to be the result of infection with strains of human papilloma virus that also cause cervical cancer and other malignancies.
Overdose deaths could increase with 'changing nature' of opioid epidemic
The opioid epidemic in the United States could be responsible for 700,000 overdose deaths between 2016 and 2025, according to a new study published today in JAMA Network Open.
Immunotherapy drug used as 1st-line therapy for Merkel cell carcinoma improved survival
A multi-center phase II clinical trial investigating pembrolizumab as a first-line and programmed cell death-1 therapy in patients with advanced Merkel cell carcinoma reports lasting tumor control, generally manageable side effects and improved overall survival.
Scientists discover a better way to make plastics out of sulfur
Scientists at the University of Liverpool have discovered a new process to make polymers out of sulfur which could provide a way of making plastic that is less harmful to the environment.
Anti-microRNAs are possible new therapeutic target for type 2 diabetes
Researchers have shown that targeted silencing of microRNA-132, which is over-expressed in type 2 diabetes, can result in improved insulin secretion and reduced blood glucose in mice and increased insulin secretion in isolated human islet cells.
All the data in the sky, alerted via UW eyes
The Zwicky Transient Facility, based at the Palomar Observatory, has identified over a thousand new objects and phenomena in the night sky, including more than 1,100 new supernovae and 50 near-Earth asteroids.
DNA provides insights into penguin evolution and reveals two new extinct penguins
New University of Otago research has improved our understanding of when and why penguins evolved, and has identified two recently extinct penguins from New Zealand's remote Chatham Islands.
Working it out: Researchers find exercise may help fight depression in seniors
The benefits of exercise are widely known but kinesiologists at McMaster University have for the first time found that physical activity may help fight depression in seniors by stimulating muscle-generated mood boosters.
Feinstein CEO, global researchers show significance of neurotransmitter in viral infection
Feinstein Institute for Medical Research President and CEO Kevin J.
Novel electrocatalyst outperforms platinum in alkaline hydrogen production
A novel ruthenium-based catalyst developed at UC Santa Cruz has shown markedly better performance than commercial platinum catalysts in alkaline water electrolysis for hydrogen production.
Liberal sprinkling of salt discovered around a young star
New ALMA observations show there is ordinary table salt in a not-so-ordinary location: 1,500 light-years from Earth in the disk surrounding a massive young star.
Reversal agent decreases life-threatening bleeding
The blood thinner reversal agent - andexanet alfa -was effective at stopping acute major bleeding in patients taking factor Xa inhibitor blood thinners.
Landslides triggered by Hurricane Maria
Hurricane Maria hit the island of Puerto Rico on 20 September 2017 and triggered more than 40,000 landslides in at least three-fourths of Puerto Rico's 78 municipalities.
Illinois professor to lead AAAS session on 'Blockchain and the Scientific Method'
Lav Varshney, an assistant professor of electrical and computer engineering at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, will lead a session on 'Blockchain and the Scientific Method' as a part of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) annual meeting in Washington D.C., on February 15, 2019.
New measurements of exotic form of magnesium suggest surprising shape-shift
An international team led by scientists at the Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) has reproduced an exotic form of magnesium, known as magnesium-40, and gleaned new and surprising clues about its nuclear structure.
Choosy amphipods
Amphipods of the species Gammarus roeselii guard their chosen mates, often carrying them with them for days and defending them against potential rivals.
What is white chocolate? (video)
Today, we're showing our love for white chocolate. Sure, it lacks the rich flavor of milk chocolate and the glossy brown color of dark chocolate.
Hubble reveals dynamic atmospheres of Uranus, Neptune
NASA's Hubble Space Telescope has uncovered another mysterious dark storm on Neptune and provided a fresh look at a long-lived storm circling around the north polar region on Uranus.
Keeping things moving
Lubricants keep the world moving, but they leave a heavy environmental footprint.
Phthalates may impair fertility in female mice
A phthalate found in many plastic and personal care products may decrease fertility in female mice, a new study found.
Study finds HIV+ cancer patients benefit from immunotherapy
The immunotherapy that has revolutionized treatment of many cancers appears to offer similar benefit to cancer patients living with HIV.
Certara advances global initiative to take model-informed precision dosing (MIPD) into the clinic
Certara recognized several years ago that model-informed drug development could also provide tremendous value if used by healthcare providers to determine the optimal drug dose for individual patients in the clinic.
Evidence for a new fundamental constant of the sun
New research undertaken at Northumbria University, Newcastle, shows that the sun's magnetic waves behave differently than currently believed.
High rates of weight-based bullying found among LBGTQ adolescents
Adolescents who identify as LGBTQ often face victimization and bullying because of their sexual and/or gender identity.
Duke-NUS study: Interaction between two immune cell types could be key to better dengue vaccines
A sentinel immune cell in the skin surprises researchers by forming a physical connection with a virus-killing T cell.
Relationship counseling encourages couples HIV testing
It's long been known that couples HIV testing and counseling is an effective way to mutually disclose HIV status and link to health care -- unfortunately, couples don't use it even though it's widely available.
Green water-purification system works without heavy metals or corrosive chemicals
Scientists at the Institute of Process Engineering at the Chinese Academy of Sciences in Beijing and Yangzhou University in Jiangsu have developed an effective and energy-efficient technique for purifying water by using graphitic carbon nitride sheets.
Removing more blood via minimally invasive surgery more likely to improve hemorrhagic stroke recover
The greater the volume of blood removed from the brain via minimally invasive surgery after a hemorrhagic stroke the greater the odds of better functional recovery.
Biologists answer fundamental question about cell size
MIT biologists have discovered why cell sizes are so tightly regulated.
First identification of brain's preparation for action
Neuroscientists have identified the processes which occur in our brains milliseconds before we undertake a series of movements, crucial for speech, handwriting, sports or playing a musical instrument.
First transport measurements reveal intriguing properties of germanene
Germanene is a 2D material that derives from germanium and is related to graphene.
Bee dispersal ability may influence conservation measures
The abilities of various bee species to disperse influences the pattern of their population's genetic structure, which, in turn, can constrain how they respond to environmental change, as reported by an international team of researchers.
Could omega-3 fatty acids help prevent miscarriages?
A new study in mice reveals that omega-3s, a type of fat found in fish oil, reduces fetal and neonatal deaths, suggesting they could prevent some miscarriages in women.
Research details sticky situations at the nanoscale
In a finding that will be useful in nanoscale engineering, Brown University researchers have shown that miniscule differences in the roughness of surfaces can have important effects on how they stick together.
Minimally-invasive surgery for brain bleeds may not be better at restoring function than standard me
MISTIE III trial finds surgery for brain bleeding may not be better than medical treatment in restoring function but was better at reducing the risk of death.
Emerging therapies show benefit to patients with Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis
It is estimated that 3 million Americans live with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), including Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis.
Finding chemicals inside a cell
How are chemicals distributed in a cell? Chinese scientists have developed a combined mass spectrometry and biological imaging device that enables direct, label-free detection, and high-resolution mapping of chemicals inside a biological cell.
Game behavior can give a hint about player gender
Researchers from ITMO University managed to predict people's personality features such as gender using data from online gaming platform.
Increased patient-provider communication affects outcomes of the IBD patient journey
It is estimated that 3 million Americans live with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), including Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC).
Big data approach shown to be effective for evaluating autism treatments
Researchers at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute who developed a blood test to help diagnose autism spectrum disorder have now successfully applied their distinctive big data-based approach to evaluating possible treatments.
Cancer cells' plasticity makes them harder to stop
Rice University researchers detail a direct connection between gene regulation and metabolic pathways and how cancer cells take advantage of it to adapt to hostile environments, a process known as cancer metabolic reprogramming.
Tak Mak lab discovers how the immune system 'thinks'
New research from the laboratory of cancer scientist Dr. Tak Mak, renowned for cloning the human T-cell receptor, has demonstrated that immune cells make brain chemicals to fight off infections.
Who's listening? Mosquitos can hear up to 10 meters away
Mosquitoes can hear over distances much greater than anyone suspected, according to researchers at Cornell and Binghamton University.
NASA satellite shows Tropical Cyclone Gelena near Madagascar
A visible-light image from NASA's Terra satellite revealed Tropical Cyclone Gelena was strengthening off the northeastern coast of Madagascar.
Sociologists study the impact religion has on child development
Do children raised by religious parents have better social and psychological development than those raised in non-religious homes?
The protective role of dengue immunity on Zika infection in a Brazilian favela
By monitoring the spread of Zika virus through a densely populated Brazilian favela during a 2015 outbreak, researchers have gained new perspectives into the outbreaks of this virus in the Americas in recent years.
Open-access satellite data allows tracking of seasonal population movements
A massive release of passive-surveillance satellite data of nighttime lights could help researchers in fields ranging from agriculture to epidemiology.
Promising results for new acute porphyria treatment
Acute porphyria is a group of uncommon diseases that can cause severe, potentially life-threatening attacks of abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting and paralysis.
This is a neuron on nicotine
Newly developed sensors visually illustrate how nicotine affects cells from the inside out.
67 percent of bankruptcy filers cite illness and medical bills as contributors to financial ruin
Medical problems contributed to 66.5 percent of all bankruptcies according to a study published in the American Journal of Public Health, a percentage that is virtually unchanged since the passage of the ACA.
New materials for high-voltage supercapacitors
A research team led by Tohoku University in Japan has developed new materials for supercapacitors with higher voltage and better stability than other materials.
The American College of Chest Physicians updates guidelines on PAH
The American College of Chest Physicians® (CHEST) announced the publication of updates to the evidence-based guidelines on therapy for pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH).
Deep sea reveals linkage between earthquake and carbon cycle
In order to understand the global carbon cycle, deep-sea exploration is essential, an international team led by geologists from Innsbruck concludes.
Finally available in a bottle
Researchers succeed in gaining access to an important chemical compound.
Report from prestigious NIH-funded conference looks to biological 'pillars of aging'
Geriatrics researchers and clinicians hope a new understanding--one honed at a prestigious conference hosted by the American Geriatrics Society (AGS) and the National Institute on Aging (NIA), with support from The John A.
High-calorie desserts might not be all bad
If you're going to choose dessert first, then the high-calorie option might lead to your eating a healthier meal, unless you have a lot on your mind, according to new research published by the American Psychological Association.
Seafood mislabelling persistent throughout supply chain, study finds
Researchers examined 203 samples from 12 key targeted species collected from various importers, processing plants and retailers in Ontario.
Scientists develop metal-free photocatalyst to purify pathogen-rich water in minutes
Scientists across the world have been racking their brains to solve the global problem of clean water scarcity.
Is chronic rhinosinusitis associated with increased risk of depression, anxiety?
Chronic rhinosinusitis is a common condition marked by sinus inflammation that can make breathing difficult and cause face pain or tenderness.
Mosaic-like gene deletion and duplication pattern shaping the immune system discovered
A team of researchers from Bar-Ilan University has developed a computational tool for analyzing genetic changes related to the immune system.
Viral communications hacking boosts Leishmania infections
New research from McGill University has found that a virus infecting the Leishmania parasite spreads by exploiting a mechanism used for cell-to-cell communication, a discovery that could pave the way to new vaccines against infections that cause severe disfiguration.
Two independent mechanisms are involved in tuberous sclerosis
The development of the rare condition called tuberous sclerosis involves mTORC1-dependent and -independent mechanisms.
Improving diagnosis leads to better outcomes in patients with inflammatory bowel disease
It is estimated that 3 million Americans live with inflammatory bowel disease, including Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis.
Parenting in the age of legal pot: Household rules, conversations help guide teen use
The legalization of marijuana in Washington state in 2012 gave parents the opportunity for a new teachable moment.
NASA finds a pinhole eye in Tropical Cyclone Funani
Visible-light imagery from NASA's Aqua satellite revealed the development of a small eye in Tropical Cyclone Funani as the storm rapidly intensified into a major hurricane in the Southern Indian Ocean.
Scientists generate functional, transplantable B cells from mice
Functional B-1 cells derived from mouse embryonic stem cells are capable of long-term engraftment and secrete natural antibodies after transplantation in mice, researchers report Feb.
Scientists develop first fabric to automatically cool or insulate depending on conditions
Researchers at the University of Maryland have engineered a new fabric from synthetic yarn with a carbon nanotube coating that is activated by temperature and humidity, releasing heat in warm humid conditions and trapping heat when conditions are cool and dry.
Study explores new way to help increase conservation impact
A study led by researchers at the University of Southampton reveals huge variations in the similarity and breadth of animal roles in nature across different parts of the world.
Putting female mosquitoes on human diet drugs could reduce spread of disease
In a study publishing Feb. 7 in the journal Cell, researchers report that they have identified drugs that can reduce mosquito hunger for blood.
Untangling the impacts of gut bacteria on drug metabolism
Individual drugs show variations in how successful or toxic they are, person to person.
Stalled fertility declines linked to disruptions in women's education in Africa
A slowdown in fertility decline in sub-Saharan Africa was partially caused by disruptions in women's education in the 1980s, according to new IIASA research.
NIH study provides answer to long-held debate on blood sugar control after stroke
Doctors all over the world have debated whether intensive glucose management, which requires the use of IV insulin to bring blood sugar levels down to 80-130 mg/dL, or standard glucose control using insulin shots, which aims to get glucose below 180 mg/dL, lead to better outcomes after stroke.
Drug-resistant tuberculosis: High mortality rate due to inaccurate tests
Inaccurate tests carried out on tuberculosis patients in developing countries often fail to reliably detect resistance to drugs, leading to incorrect treatment and a higher mortality rate.
Healthy ageing and grandmother involvement with grandchildren benefit multiple generations
Women live remarkably long after their fertility ends, but why?
Ingestible injections made possible by a tortoise-inspired drug delivery device
A new ingestible device, inspired by the self-orienting shape of the leopard tortoise's shell, may soon be used to administer drugs by injecting them through the stomach wall.
New legislation needed to regulate police facial recognition technology
Facial recognition technology, being trialled by two major police forces in Britain, should be subjected to more rigorous testing and transparency, according to new research from the University of East Anglia (UEA) and Monash University.
Engineered DNA vaccine protects against emerging Mayaro virus infection
A novel, synthetic DNA vaccine developed at The Wistar Institute induces protective immunity against Mayaro virus (MAYV), a mosquito-borne infection endemic to South America, that has the potential to become a global emerging viral threat.
Blood cells could hold master clock behind aging
Blood cells could hold the key to aging, according to new research out of Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine.
Case study documents bone cancer in 240-million-year-old stem-turtle
This research letter documents bone cancer in a 240-million-year-old stem-turtle from the Triassic period, helping to provide more data about the history of cancer in tetrapod evolution.
Thirdhand smoke residue exposes children to chemicals
In ''Nicotine on Children's Hands: Limited Protection of Smoking Bans and Initial Clinical Findings,'' published Jan.
Comprehensive review analyzes vocal-cord restoration in 18 Grammy Award-winning singers
A retrospective review of laser microsugery performed in 18 Grammy Award-winning performers treated by surgeons at the Massachusetts General Hospital Division of Laryngeal Surgery has revealed insights into the treatment and management of vocal-cord disease in elite performers.
New technique pinpoints milestones in the evolution of bacteria
MIT scientists have devised a reliable way to determine when certain groups of bacteria appeared in the evolutionary record.
The physics underlying complex biological architectures
In a new study published in Cell, physicists developed a model that describes how patterns form on pollen spores.
Walnut consumers tend to have lower prevalence of depression symptoms, says new study
A new epidemiological study suggests consuming walnuts may be associated with a lower prevalence and frequency of depression symptoms among American adults.
Nanomachines are taught to fight cancer
Scientists from ITMO University in collaboration with their international colleagues proposed new DNA-based nanomachines that can be used for gene therapy of cancer.
Studies lend support to 'grandmother hypothesis,' but there are limits
Humans are unusual in that women go through menopause and stop reproducing long before reaching the end of their life expectancy.
An adaptive textile keeps cool by self-regulating its thermal properties
Researchers have developed a 'cool' textile that self-regulates its thermal properties based on how hot, sweaty or cold the wearer is, according to a new report.
Dengue immunity may buffer against Zika, study finds
Research conducted by a team led by the Brazilian Ministry of Health and including University of Florida epidemiologist Derek Cummings finds that previous infection with dengue reduces one's risk of infection with Zika.
Breast cancer cells shifted into HER2 positive status with bold new strategy
One of the most effective breast cancer drugs, Herceptin, is only available to people whose tumors test HER2-positive.
Can machine learning deliver critical market insight on consumer needs faster and cheaper?
Consumer brands have long used old-fashioned focus groups, interviews and surveys to best gauge consumer wants, desires and needs as part of processes that range from product development, to marketing and sales.
Mosquitoes can hear from longer distances than previously thought
While most hearing experts would say an eardrum is required for long distance hearing, a new study from Binghamton University and Cornell University has found that Aedes aegypti mosquitos can use their antennae to detect sounds that are at least 10 meters away.
A better eyeshot of the makeup of ancient meteorites
A team of Japanese and American scientists has visualized meteorite components at resolution powers much higher than ever before.
Butterflies are genetically wired to choose a mate that looks just like them
Male butterflies have genes which give them a sexual preference for a partner with a similar appearance to themselves, according to new research.
USC scientists find a cheaper way to light up OLED screens
USC Dornsife chemists appear to have finished the quest for a cheaper, efficient alternative to the iridium compounds while also solving the decades-long problem with the color blue.
Finding clues to a functional HIV cure
George Mason University's Yuntao Wu's research team has identified a measurable indicator that could prove instrumental in the fight against HIV.
New findings could make mosquitos more satisfied -- and safer to be around
Scientists have learned new tricks that could be useful in preventing mosquito-borne illnesses such as Zika and yellow fever.
Size and time impact outcomes when mechanical clot removal used for large core strokes
Patient outcomes with large core stroke damage are worse the larger the core volume and the longer the time lapse between stroke onset and treatment.
Tune in and switch off
The simple act of switching on the TV for some downtime could be making a bigger contribution to childhood obesity than we realise, according to new research from the University of South Australia.
ELSI research suggests life thrived on Earth 3.5 billion years ago
3.5 billion years ago Earth hosted life, but was it barely surviving, or thriving?

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Climate Crisis
There's no greater threat to humanity than climate change. What can we do to stop the worst consequences? This hour, TED speakers explore how we can save our planet and whether we can do it in time. Guests include climate activist Greta Thunberg, chemical engineer Jennifer Wilcox, research scientist Sean Davis, food innovator Bruce Friedrich, and psychologist Per Espen Stoknes.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#527 Honey I CRISPR'd the Kids
This week we're coming to you from Awesome Con in Washington, D.C. There, host Bethany Brookshire led a panel of three amazing guests to talk about the promise and perils of CRISPR, and what happens now that CRISPR babies have (maybe?) been born. Featuring science writer Tina Saey, molecular biologist Anne Simon, and bioethicist Alan Regenberg. A Nobel Prize winner argues banning CRISPR babies won’t work Geneticists push for a 5-year global ban on gene-edited babies A CRISPR spin-off causes unintended typos in DNA News of the first gene-edited babies ignited a firestorm The researcher who created CRISPR twins defends...