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Science Current Events and Science News | Brightsurf | February 08, 2019


Gummy-like robots that could help prevent disease
EPFL scientists have developed microscopic, hydrogel-based muscles that can manipulate and mechanically stimulate biological tissue.
Study finds a dearth of mental health interventions for ethnic minority youth in the US
A research team from Arizona State University, DePaul University and the University of Southern California analyzed how effective evidence-based mental health intervention programs were for ethnic minority youth in the United States.
Shedding light on the science of auroral breakups
Japanese scientists have quantitatively confirmed how energetic an auroral breakup can be.
Dengue virus infection may cause severe outcomes following Zika virus infection during pregnancy
This study is the first to report a possible mechanism for the enhancement of Zika virus progression during pregnancy in an animal model.
Planning ahead: A new robust approach for minimizing costs in power-distribution networks
Scientists at Tokyo Tech have developed a new method for scheduling the turning on and off of power generators that minimizes costs and ensures reliability while addressing the issues prevalent in multiple previous methods.
Shorter course of radiation therapy effective in treating men with prostate cancer
A new UCLA-led study shows that men with low- or intermediate-risk prostate cancer can safely undergo higher doses of radiation over a significantly shorter period of time and still have the same, successful outcomes as from a much longer course of treatment.
Women's hormones play role in drug addiction, higher relapse rates
Female-specific interventions are needed, but in the meantime, treatment centers could use this study to educate women about their stronger mental connections to places and objects.
Psychology: Robot saved, people take the hit
To what extent are people prepared to show consideration for robots?
A new protocol for Hepatitis A vaccination to prevent a vaccine-resistant virus
Researchers of the University of Barcelona (UB) have analysed, with massive sequencing techniques for the first time, the evolution of the Hepatitis A virus with samples from patients.
Famous 'sandpile model' shown to move like a traveling sand dune
The so-called Abelian sandpile model has been studied by scientists for more than 30 years.
Scientists image conducting edges in a promising 2D material
A research team comprised of scientists at the University of California, Riverside, and the University of Washington has for the first time directly imaged 'edge conduction' in monolayer tungsten ditelluride, or WTe2, a newly discovered 2D topological insulator and quantum material.
Rice U. lab adds porous envelope to aluminum plasmonics
New research from Rice University's Laboratory for Nanophotonics describes the first combination of a gas-trapping molecular sieve called a metal-organic framework, or MOF, with catalytic aluminum nanocrystals that can draw their power from sunlight.
Study identifies new target to prevent, treat alcoholism
New research conducted at OHSU in Portland, Oregon, identifies a gene that could provide a new target for developing medication to prevent and treat alcoholism.
Munitions at the bottom of the Baltic Sea
The bottom of the Baltic Sea is home to large quantities of sunken munitions, a legacy of the Second World War -- and often very close to shore.
New insights into radial expansion of plants can boost biomass production
Besides the obvious longitudinal growth, plants also enlarge in the radial sense.
Rating riverside corridors -- the 'escape routes' for animals under climate change
While riverside habitats are known to be important for species migrating under climate change, this is the first study to rank riparian areas as targets for restoration and conservation efforts.
MDMA users more empathetic than other drug users
Long-term MDMA users have higher levels of empathy than cannabis and other drugs users, new research suggests.
Among Latinos, Puerto Rican children less likely to use their asthma inhalers
Compared to Mexican American children, Puerto Rican children were more likely to have poor or decreasing use of inhaled medication needed to control their asthma, according to new research published online in the Annals of the American Thoracic Society.
Seasons change: Researchers provide new definition for major Indian monsoon season
FSU Professor of Meteorology Vasu Misra has used detailed surface temperature analyses to develop the first-ever objective definition of the Northeast Indian Monsoon.
NASA's Aqua Satellite finds Tropical Cyclone Gelena's strongest side
NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the Southern Indian Ocean and captured an infrared image of Tropical Cyclone Gelena that revealed strongest storms were northwest of the eye.
Zwicky Transient Facility spots a bumper crop of supernovae, black holes and more
The Zwicky Transient Facility (ZTF), an automated sky survey project based at Caltech's Palomar Observatory near San Diego, California, has produced its first bounty of new results.
Genome scientists develop novel approaches to studying widespread form of malaria
Scientists at the Institute of Genome Sciences (IGS) at the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM) have developed a novel way with genome sequences to study and better understand transmission, treat and ultimately eradicate Plasmodium vivax, the most widespread form of malaria.
How the brain responds to texture
New research by neuroscientists at the University of Chicago shows that as neurons process information about texture from the skin, they each respond differently to various features of a surface, creating a high-dimensional representation of texture in the brain.
Vitamin D and immune cells stimulate bone marrow disease
The bone marrow disease myelofibrosis is stimulated by excessive signaling from vitamin D and immune cells known as macrophages, reveals a Japanese research team.
Turning a porous material's color on and off with acid
Stable, color-changing compound shows potential for electronics, sensors and gas storage.
Does the presence of colleges and hospitals increase home prices?
Whether the presence of a college or hospital increases a home's value has to do with the institution's size and the ZIP code's population, says a new study by computer scientists at the University of California, Riverside.
Supercomputing propels jet atomization research for industrial processes
Researchers at the Bundeswehr University Munich recently appeared on the cover of the Journal of Fluid Mechanics for their simulations studying turbulence in jet sprays at the atomic level.
How poppy flowers get those vibrant colours that entice insects
With bright reds and yellows -- and even the occasional white -- poppies are very bright and colorful.
Chang'e 4 Rover comes into view
The Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter got a closer look at Chang'e 4 on the lunar far side.
Investment in LEGO can yield returns of up to 600 percent
Economists of the Higher School of Economics Victoria Dobrynskaya and Yulia Kishilova analyzed secondary market prices of the world-famous toy construction sets released from 1987-2014.
Researchers develop human cell-based model to study small cell lung cancer
Researchers from Weill Cornell Medicine have used human embryonic stem cells to create a new model system that allows them to study the initiation and progression of small cell lung cancer (SCLC).
How bees stay cool on hot summer days
Harvard researchers have developed a framework that explains how bees use environmental signals to collectively cluster and continuously ventilate the hive.
New drug brings unexpected hope in targeting cancer cells
An unexpected finding in preclinical platelet studies by Baker Institute researchers could provide a novel approach to targeting and destroying difficult-to-treat cancer cells, providing new therapeutic options for a range of cancers.
Optimism associated with less likelihood of new pain reported by soldiers after deployment
Many veterans experience chronic pain after deployment. This study of almost 21,000 US Army soldiers who deployed to Afghanistan or Iraq examined the association between feelings of optimism (such as expecting the best and believing good things will happen) before deployment and new reports of pain after deployment, including new back pain, joint pain and frequent headaches.
How exercise may protect against Alzheimer's
A hormone called irisin -- produced during exercise -- may protect neurons against Alzheimer's disease.
New method improves infrared imaging performance
By successfully suppressing spectral cross-talk in dual-band photodetectors, Professor Manijeh Razeghi has opened the door to a new generation of infrared imaging devices with applications in medicine as well as defense and security.
New insight into cell receptors opens the way for tailored cancer drugs
New research on how cancer mutations influence a certain type of receptor on the cell membrane opens the way for the development of tailored drugs for certain cancers, such as rectal cancer and lung cancer.
Sodium intake associated with increased lightheadedness in context of DASH-sodium trial
Researchers at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center found that higher sodium intake, when studied in the context of the DASH-Sodium trial (Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension), increases lightheadedness.
Innovative, simple treatment to combat the Candida albicans fungus
A study led by the UPV/EHU has developed an innovative, simple treatment based uterine stem cells to combat the Candida albicans fungus, responsible for vaginal candidiasis disease Despite not being life-threatening, this disease, which is very widespread among women, reduces patient life quality owing to its symptoms (itching and stinging).
'X-ray gun' helps researchers pinpoint the origins of pottery found on ancient shipwreck
About eight hundred years ago, a ship sank in the Java Sea.
Positive thinking during pregnancy could help children's ability in math and science
Your attitude during pregnancy could have an effect on your child's ability in math and science, according to a new study published by Frontiers in Psychology today.
Life on the edge in the quantum world
Pulling off high-speed energy transfers in the lab gives researchers insight into quantum computing, high-speed rechargeable batteries, and other future applications of quantum technology.
How a fungus can cripple the immune system
An international research team led by Professor Oliver Werz of Friedrich Schiller University, Jena, has now discovered how the fungus knocks out the immune defenses, enabling a potentially fatal fungal infection to develop.
Is it better to have a heart attack while traveling or at home?
Is it better to have a heart attack while travelling or at home?
New NIH research policy seeks greater inclusion across lifespan
Beginning this year, the National Institutes of Health will for the first time in its history require NIH-funded scholars to eliminate arbitrary age limits in their work, age limits that previously allowed for excluding groups like older people without just cause.
Cricket females choose male losers
According to popular belief, females prefer males with high social status (alpha males) when as partners to continue the race.
UCI-led study reveals how blood cells help wounds heal scar-free
New insights on circumventing a key obstacle on the road to anti-scarring treatment have been published by Maksim Plikus, an associate professor in development and cell biology at the UCI School of Biological Sciences and colleagues in Nature Communications.
Study: Serious health concerns missed in older adults
Researchers examined the prevalence and impact of six common symptoms (pain, fatigue, depression, anxiety, breathing difficulty, sleep problems) and found that nearly half of adults ages 65 and older have two or more of these symptoms and one-fourth have three or more.
Nitrogen gets in the fast lane for chemical synthesis
A new one-step method discovered by synthetic organic chemists at Rice University allows nitrogen atoms to be added to precursor compounds used in the design and manufacture of drugs, pesticides, fertilizers and other products.
MRI cardiac stress test shows promise at identifying fatal heart disease
Results from a large, multi-center study suggest that cardiac magnetic resonance, or CMR, has potential as a non-invasive, non-toxic alternative to stress echocardiograms, catheterizations and stress nuclear exams in identifying the severity of coronary artery disease.
DNA traces on wild flowers reveal insect visitors
Researchers have discovered that insects leave tiny DNA traces on the flowers they visit.
When sequencing fails to pinpoint a rare disease
Genomics fails to diagnose up to half of patients who are tested.
Think big -- at least when it comes to global conservation
According to a group of international researchers, the potential for large countries to contribute to environmental protection is being overlooked.
Tackling tumour scar tissue could be key to treating pancreatic cancer
The first study in the world to take a detailed look at scar tissue in human pancreatic cancer has revealed a range of different scar tissue types that could help clinicians predict which patients will respond best to particular treatments.
Study reveals complementary medicine use remains hidden to conventional medicine providers
Research reveals that 1 in 3 complementary medicine (CM) users do not disclose their CM use to their medical providers, posing significant direct and indirect risks of adverse effects and harm due to unsafe concurrent use of CM and conventional medicine use.
Scientists discover genes that help harmful bacteria thwart treatment
A Rutgers-led team has discovered two genes that make some strains of harmful Staphyloccocus bacteria resistant to treatment by copper, a potent and frequently used antibacterial agent.
Lightning's electromagnetic fields may have protective properties
Extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields associated with lightning may have played an evolutionary role in living organisms, Tel Aviv University research has found.
Five solutions offered for achieving gender equality in medicine and science
n a review published in a special issue of The Lancet, Professors Sonia Kang and Sarah Kaplan of the University of Toronto's Rotman School of Management identify five myths that continue to perpetuate gender bias and offer five strategies for improving not only the number of women in medicine, but also their lived experiences, capacity to aspire, and opportunity to succeed.
A better way to make acrylics
Acrylics are an incredibly diverse and useful family of chemicals used in all kinds of products, from diapers to nail polish.
Cryo-force spectroscopy reveals the mechanical properties of DNA components
Physicists from the University of Basel have developed a new method to examine the elasticity and binding properties of DNA molecules on a surface at extremely low temperatures.
Fluconazole makes fungi sexually active
Under the influence of the drug fluconazole, the fungus Candida albicans can change its mode of reproduction and thus become even more resistant.
Sea snakes that can't drink seawater
New research from the University of Florida shows that pelagic sea snakes quench their thirst by drinking freshwater that collects on the surface of the ocean after heavy rainfall.
NASA looks at Tropical Cyclone Funani's rainfall rates
Tropical Cyclone Funani continued tracking southeast through the Southern Indian Ocean on Feb.
Researchers help define Southern Ocean's geological features
The scientists present data from the region that show the Australian-Antarctic Ridge has isotopic compositions distinct from both the Pacific and Indian mantle domains.
New phenomenon discovered that fixes a common problem in lasers: Wavelength splitting
A team led by University of Utah physicists has discovered how to fix a major problem that occurs in lasers made from a new type of material called quantum dots.
Mayo Clinic finds individualized diets are most effective for managing blood sugar levels
An individualized diet based on a person's genetics, microbiome and lifestyle is more effective in controlling blood glucose (sugar) levels than one that considers only nutritional composition of food, Mayo Clinic researchers have confirmed.
Adenoid and tonsil trouble for teens
With a new, exacting longitudinal study, Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU)-led researchers challenge the established medical consensus that adenoids and tonsils shrink significantly during the teenage years.
The 2008 recession associated with greater decline in mortality in Europe
In recent decades, Europe has experienced a downward trend in the annual number of deaths.
Anther rubbing, a new movement discovered in plants, promotes prior selfing
Most plants have developed mechanisms to prevent self-fertilization and its detrimental effects of inbreeding depression.
Bridging the 'liking-gap,' researchers discuss awkwardness of conversations
Social and personality psychologists will present their latest findings on how people engage in casual conversations, and what this means for our own performance anxiety.
New study linking blight and homicide may help predict where murder may occur
A new study led by LSU Department of Sociology Assistant Professor Matthew Valasik is the first to show a statistical connection between homicide, blighted buildings and convenient stores.
At-home rehab comparable to clinic-based therapy to improve mobility
Home-based telerehabilitation is as effective as clinic-based therapy at improving arm function.
Neurologists speak out about gender disparity at global stroke gathering
The International Stroke Conference (ISC) attracts thousands of neurologists each year to network with fellow experts and watch compelling presentations on the very latest advances in clinical care, science, and education.
Mixed results on early human testing of iron chelation after brain bleed
Removing iron and toxins from the body after a brain bleed had little effect on intracerebral hemorrhage stroke recovery at three months but might have potential benefits at six months.
You are what you eat: A color-changing insect modifies diet to become distasteful
When young spotted lanternflies grow they become brightly red. Around this time, they also begin to feed almost exclusively on the tree of heaven, from which they suck bitter juices into their bodies.

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