Nav: Home

Science Current Events and Science News | Brightsurf | February 11, 2019


Climate change: Scientists tap nature, space and society
Three scientists share their research from the natural, physical, and social sciences on novel responses to climate change during the 2019 AAAS Annual Meeting on February 16th, 2019 at 3:30 PM, Marriott Wardman Park, Delaware Suite.
Grocery-store based nutrition education improves eating habits
Hypertension affects over 60 million adults in the United States and less than half have their condition under control.
Bias may affect providers' knowledge of transgender health
Transphobia rather than education predicts provider knowledge of transgender health care.
LGBTQ youths are over-represented, have poorer outcomes in child welfare system
LGBTQ youths are more likely to end up in foster care or unstable housing and suffer negative outcomes, such as substance abuse or mental health issues, while living in the child welfare system, according to new research from The University of Texas at Austin.
On the land, one-quarter of vertebrates die because of humans
Humans have a ''disproportionately huge effect'' on the other species of vertebrates that share Earth's surface with us, causing more than 25 percent of the deaths among an array of species all over the globe, according to a recently published study.
More than half a million breast cancer deaths averted in the US over three decades
Latest US estimates indicate that since 1989, hundreds of thousands of women's lives have been saved by mammography and improvements in breast cancer treatment.
Research characterizes evolution of pathway for reproductive fitness in flowering plants
Small RNAs are key regulators involved in plant growth and development.
Potent marijuana edibles can pose a major unrecognized risk to patients with cardiovascular disease
As marijuana legalization sweeps North America, use of the substance has been on the rise, and the public's attitude is shifting.
Quantum strangeness gives rise to new electronics
Today, a new breed of electronic devices, bearing unique properties, is being developed.
Theories describe dynamically disordered solid materials
Theoretical physicists at Linköping University have developed a computational method to calculate the transition from one phase to another in dynamically disordered solid materials.
UMN researchers 3D bio-print a model that could lead to improved anticancer drugs and treatments
University of Minnesota researchers have developed a way to study cancer cells which could lead to new and improved treatment.
Immunotherapy can be effective in treating people with recurrent glioblastoma
A UCLA-led study suggests that for people with recurrent glioblastoma, administering an immunotherapy drug before surgery is more effective than using the drug afterward.
Learning a second alphabet for a first language
A part of the brain that maps letters to sounds can acquire a second, visually distinct alphabet for the same language, according to a study of English speakers published in eNeuro.
Could energy overload drive cancer risk?
By providing an over-abundance of energy to cells, diseases like obesity and diabetes might super-charge growth and cause cells to become cancerous.
Keeping SDGs from being a zero-sum game
Even as the world gets on the same sustainability page courtesy of the United Nation Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), those very goals can result in significant tradeoffs.
Women less likely to receive geriatric care for emergency hip surgery
More than 70 percent of patients receiving surgery for hip fracture are women, yet they are less likely than men to receive geriatric care during hospitalization, or an anesthesiology consultation before surgery, found a study published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal).
Your genes could impact the quality of your marriage
The quality of your marriage could be affected by your genes, according to new research conducted at Binghamton University, State University of New York.
Tracking HIV's ever-evolving genome in effort to prioritize public health resources
Using HIV genetic data, researchers discovered that transgender women in Los Angeles are at higher risk of being in an HIV transmission network than men who have sex with men.
NIST: Blockchain provides security, traceability for smart manufacturing
Engineers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) needed a way to secure smart manufacturing systems using the digital thread , so they turned to the new kid on the block ... blockchain, that is.
Surrounded by low achievers -- High on positive emotions?
Study involving the University of Konstanz proves negative impacts of high-achieving environment on school students' individual emotional well-being.
New model predicts how ground shipping will affect future human health, environment
The trucks and trains that transport goods across the United States emit gases and particles that threaten human health and the environment.
Connection between home energy efficiency and respiratory health in low-income homes
A new study finds people living in drafty homes in low-income, urban communities are at a higher risk of respiratory health issues.
Researchers use X-rays to understand the flaws of battery fast charging
Argonne researchers used the laboratory's Advanced Photon Source to image a battery as it was quickly charged and discharged, allowing for the observation of lithium plating behavior that can inhibit the battery's long-term function.
Access to federally qualified health centers does not translate into lower rates of ED use
There is no association between access to federally qualified health centers (FQHCs) and emergency department visits for either uninsured or Medicaid-insured patients.
Next-generation optics in just two minutes of cooking time
One of the key building blocks of flexible photonic circuits and ultra-thin optics are metasurfaces.
NUS marine scientists find toxic bacteria on microplastics retrieved from tropical waters
A team of marine scientists from the National University of Singapore had uncovered toxic bacteria living on the surfaces of microplastics (which are pieces of plastic smaller than 5 millimetres in size) collected from the coastal areas of Singapore.
Do you like Earth's solid surface and life-inclined climate? Thank your lucky (massive) star
Earth's solid surface and moderate climate may be due, in part, to a massive star in the birth environment of the sun, according to new computer simulations of planet formation.
Why children struggle with the 'cocktail party effect'
Researchers have clarified the development of the ability to attend to a speaker in a noisy environment -- a phenomenon known as the 'cocktail party effect.' Published in JNeurosci, the study could have implications for helping children navigate the often-noisy surroundings in which they grow and learn.
Geneticists ID molecular pathway for autism-related disorder
Discovery of molecular trigger for autism-related disorder leads scientists to test potential therapy on mice.
New target could help protect vision following optic nerve trauma
When a car crash or explosion results in an optic nerve injury, eliminating an enzyme known to promote inflammation appears to aid recovery, scientists report.
Do we have an epidemic? Enhancing disease surveillance using a health information exchange
While disease surveillance has shifted toward greater use of electronically transmitted information to decrease the reporting burden on physicians, the challenge of getting the right information to public health officials at the right time has not been completely solved.
Cell component breakdown suggests possible treatment for multiple neural disorders
Research published today (Feb. 11, 2019) by the Waisman Center at the University of Wisconsin-Madison reveals how one mutation causes fragile X, the most common inherited intellectual disability.
Spinal cord is 'smarter' than previously thought
New research from Western University has shown that the spinal cord is able to process and control complex functions, like the positioning of your hand in external space.
Button cell batteries: Swallowing can lead to severe health damage in small children
If button cells are swallowed, they can get stuck in the esophagus and severely damage the mucosa.
Working proteins make good use of frustration
Computational surveys show that after folding enzymes still remain partially frustrated at their active site to allow catalysis targeting.
Almost 2,000 unknown bacteria discovered in the human gut
Researchers have used computational methods to identify nearly 2,000 uncultured gut bacterial species.
Penn engineers develop room temperature, two-dimensional platform for quantum technology
Researchers at the University of Pennsylvania's School of Engineering and Applied Science have now demonstrated a new hardware platform based on isolated electron spins in a two-dimensional material.
New device simplifies measurement of fluoride contamination in water
Seeking to address fluoride contamination in drinking water, chemical engineers at EPFL have developed a portable and user-friendly device that can measure fluoride concentration accurately and reliably.
Managing young women at high risk of heart disease
Deaths from heart disease have decreased in recent decades, but these decreases have not occurred in women younger than 50.
Researchers identify novel molecular mechanism involved in Alzheimer's
Researchers at Wake Forest Baptist Health have identified a novel mechanism and potential new therapeutic target for Alzheimer's disease.
Human brain protein associated with autism confers abnormal behavior in fruit flies
A mutant gene that encodes a brain protein in a child with autism has been placed into the brains of fruit flies.
Researchers examine puzzling sizes of extremely light calcium isotopes
Michigan State University researchers have measured for the first time the nuclei of three protein-rich calcium isotopes, according to a new paper published in Nature Physics.
Facial trauma malpractice lawsuits favor physicians, Rutgers study finds
Southern courts favor physicians in malpractice lawsuits over facial trauma treatment, while courts in the Midwest favor patients, according to a Rutgers study.
RUDN biochemists found a way to stop the immortality of cancer cells with oligonucleotides
RUDN biochemists found a way to reduce the activity of telomerase (the enzyme of cell immortality) 10 times.
The Lancet: Direct-acting antivirals reduce risk of premature mortality and liver cancer for people with chronic hepatitis C
The first prospective, longitudinal study investigating treatment of chronic hepatitis C with direct-acting antivirals finds that the treatment is associated with reduced risk of mortality and liver cancer, according to a study published in The Lancet.
Hard-to-detect antibiotic resistance an underestimated clinical problem
When antibiotics are used to treat bacteria susceptible to them, the treatment usually works.
Sand from glacial melt could be Greenland's economic salvation
As climate change melts Greenland's glaciers and deposits more river sediment on its shores, an international group of researchers has identified one unforeseen economic opportunity for the Arctic nation: exporting excess sand and gravel abroad, where raw materials for infrastructure are in high demand.
Engineered miniature kidneys come of age
A research team at Harvard University has now removed a major barrier for the use of kidney organoids as a tool to model kidney diseases, test drug toxicities and eventually for the creation of organ replacements, the lack of a pervasive blood vessel system (vasculature).
Interaction between immune factors triggers cancer-promoting chronic inflammation
A Massachusetts General Hospital research team has identified interaction between two elements of the immune system as critical for the transformation of a protective immune response into chronic, cancer-promoting inflammation.
Massachusetts General study identifies brain cells that modulate behavioral response to threats
A team of investigators from the Massachusetts General Hospital Center for Regenerative Medicine has identified a population of brain cells that appears to play a role in calibrating behavioral responses to potentially threatening situations.
NASA finds possible second impact crater under Greenland ice
A NASA glaciologist has discovered a possible second impact crater buried under more than a mile of ice in northwest Greenland.
Medical bills financially burden almost half of cardiovascular disease patients
Over 45 percent of adult atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) patients suffer financial hardship related to their medical bills, including many who cannot pay their medical bills at all, according to a cardiovascular medicine and society paper published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.
New role for death molecule
To unravel programmed cell death pathways, investigators examine a molecule deemed unimportant, and find new function.
New study shows HPV not likely transmittable through the hand
Commonly known as HPV, Human papillomavirus is a virus that infects the skin and genital area, in many cases leading to a variety of genital, anal, and oropharyngeal cancers in men and women.
Interventions to reduce antibiotics require tailored approach in developing countries
Fears around leaving infectious diseases untreated and poorly enforced antibiotic supply controls could hamper efforts to reduce the use of antibiotics in low to middle income countries, according to a new study from the University of Warwick.
Scientists build the smallest optical frequency comb to-date
Scientists from EPFL and the Russian Quantum Center have built a photonic integrated, compact, and portable soliton microcomb source.
Changes in lung cells seen almost immediately after contact with low-molecular weight PAHs
University of Colorado Cancer Center study shows cancer-promoting changes in lung cells as soon as 30 minutes after exposure to low-molecular weight PAHs, adding further evidence that regulators may be underestimating the risk of these compounds.
Sophisticated blood analysis provides new clues about Ebola, treatment avenues
A detailed analysis of blood samples from Ebola patients is providing clues about the progression of the effects of the virus in patients and potential treatment pathways.
Researchers examine postpartum hospital readmissions for women with psychiatric conditions
When is the best time to screen obese women for gestational diabetes?
MU scientists use smartphones to improve dismal rating of nation's civil infrastructure
In the United States, aging civil infrastructure systems are deteriorating on a massive scale.
Researchers identify brain protein crucial to recovery from stroke
Researchers at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine have identified a brain protein at the root of how the brain recovers from stroke.
Shameful secrets bother us more than guilty secrets
Everyone has secrets, but what causes someone to think about them over and over again?
Low-income boys' inattention in kindergarten associated with lower earnings 30 years later
A new longitudinal study examined boys from low-income backgrounds to determine which behaviors in kindergarten are associated with earnings in adulthood.
New deep sea animal discoveries warrant expanded protections in Costa Rican waters
Scientists aboard Schmidt Ocean Institute's research vessel Falkor surveyed deep-sea seamounts outside Isla del Coco UNESCO World Heritage site revealing coral communities with surprising diversity.
Across the spectrum: Researchers find way to stabilize color of light in next-gen material
Researchers have found a way to stabilize the color of light emitted from a class of next-generation materials.
Researchers develop flags that generate energy from wind and sun
Scientists have created flags that can generate electrical energy using wind and solar power.
Insulin signaling failures in the brain linked to Alzheimer's disease
Using a novel mouse model, Joslin researchers demonstrate that impaired insulin signaling in the brain negatively affects cognition, mood and metabolism, all components of Alzheimer's disease.
Workshop: Getting women due credit -- on the paper
Publish or perish is an adage with particular sting for women and other underrepresented scholars prone to not getting deserved credit on scientific papers.
A bioengineered factory for T-cells
Harvard engineers and stem cell biologists have developed an injectable sponge-like gel that enhances the production T-cells after a bone marrow transplant.
Brazil-endemic plant genus Mcvaughia highlights diversity in a unique biome
A new species of the Brazil-endemic small genus Mcvaughia described as part of a extended revision of this unique group.
Modern mahouts taking care of elephants in Myanmar are younger and less experienced
Traditional elephant handling worldwide is rapidly changing. Researchers discovered that mahouts in Myanmar are only 22 years old on average, with an average experience of three years working with elephants, and they are changing elephants yearly preventing the development of long-term bonds between elephants and mahouts.
Mosquitoes that carry malaria may have been doing so 100 million years ago
The anopheline mosquitoes that carry malaria were present 100 million years ago, new research shows, potentially shedding fresh light on the history of a disease that continues to kill more than 400,000 people annually.
How common are mental health disorders, treatment in children?
An estimated 7.7 million children in the United States (16.5 percent) have at least one mental health disorder and about half didn't receive treatment from a mental health professional.
Why Mr. Nice could be Mr. Right
The key to relationship happiness could be as simple as finding a nice person.
Weyl goes chiral
Quasiparticles that behave like massless fermions, known as Weyl fermions, have been in recent years at the center of a string of exciting findings in condensed matter physics.
Using artificial intelligence to engineer materials' properties
New system of 'strain engineering' can change a material's optical, electrical, and thermal properties.
Beyond romance
Love can make us do crazy things. It often prompts us to behave in counterintuitive ways, like, for example, placing the wellbeing of our loved ones above our own.
Lefty or righty molecules lend a hand to material structures
Researchers construct block copolymers that follow the chirality of their basic elements as they self-assemble into larger structures.
Masterswitch discovered in body's immune system
Scientists have discovered a critical part of the body's immune system with potentially major implications for the treatment of some of the most devastating diseases affecting humans.
Oral contraceptives could impair women's recognition of complex emotions
Women who take the pill are nearly 10 percent worse at recognizing subtle expressions of complex emotions like pride or contempt, according to research published in Frontiers in Neuroscience.
Study: Aquaculture does little, if anything, to conserve wild fisheries
New research finds that aquaculture, or fish farming, does not help conserve wild fisheries.
How do protein tangles get so long in Alzheimer's?
Aggregates of the protein tau are a hallmark of Alzheimer's disease.
NASA's Aqua satellite shows winds shear affecting Tropical Cyclone Gelena
Visible imagery from NASA's Aqua satellite revealed the effects of wind shear on Tropical Cyclone Gelena in the Southern Indian Ocean.
Nearly half of adults with heart disease can't afford their medical bills
More than 45 percent of non-elderly adults with atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) report financial hardship due to the associated medical bills, according to a Yale research team.
Scientists use machine learning to ID source of Salmonella
A team of scientists led by researchers at the University of Georgia Center for Food Safety in Griffin has developed a machine-learning approach that could lead to quicker identification of the animal source of certain Salmonella outbreaks.
Protein released from fat after exercise improves glucose
Exercise training causes dramatic changes to fat. Additionally, this 'trained' fat releases beneficial factors into the bloodstream.
Many Arctic lakes give off less carbon than expected
New research by the University of Washington and US Geological Survey suggests many lakes in the Arctic pose little threat to global carbon levels, at least for now.
NIH researchers home in on genes linked to age-related macular degeneration
National Eye Institute scientists led a collaborative study and zeroed in on genes associated with age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a leading cause of vision loss and blindness among people age 65 and older.
Machine learning algorithm helps in the search for new drugs
Researchers have designed a machine learning algorithm for drug discovery which has been shown to be twice as efficient as the industry standard, which could accelerate the process of developing new treatments for disease.
New therapeutic target found for aggressive pediatric cancers with few treatment options
Researchers at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center have discovered that malignant rhabdoid tumors (MRT), a rare pediatric cancer without effective treatments, may be sensitive to drugs that block the cancer cell's ability to dispose of misfolded proteins.
Trump's simple, confident language has strong historical roots
To many, President Donald Trump's use of nontraditional, off-the-cuff language seems unlike that of any other politician, but new research on the language of past and present world leaders reveals simple, straightforward messaging that exudes confidence may be the new norm -- making Trump a man of his time, rhetorically speaking.
Researchers closer to new Alzheimer's therapy with brain blood flow discovery
By discovering the culprit behind decreased blood flow in the brain of people with Alzheimer's, biomedical engineers at Cornell University have made possible promising new therapies for the disease.
Western diet may increase risk of severe sepsis, death, study finds
A Western diet high in fat and sugar can pack on the pounds.
Arctic sea ice loss in the past linked to abrupt climate events
A new study on ice cores shows that reductions in sea ice in the Arctic in the period between 30-100,000 years ago led to major climate events.
Study finds upsurge in 'active surveillance' for low-risk prostate cancer
Many men with low-risk prostate cancer who most likely previously would have undergone immediate surgery or radiation are now adopting a more conservative 'active surveillance' strategy, according to an analysis of a new federal database by scientists from Dana-Farber Cancer Institute.
Gene involved in colorectal cancer also causes breast cancer
Rare mutations in the NTHL1 gene, previously associated with colorectal cancer, also cause breast cancer and other types of cancer.
Basis of efficient blue-green light harvesting and photoprotection in diatoms revealed
Diatoms are abundant photosynthetic organisms in aquatic environments; they contribute 20 percent of global primary productivity.
Phase transition dynamics in two-dimensional materials
Scientists from National University of Singapore have discovered the mechanism involved when transition metal dichalcogenides on metallic substrates transform from the semiconducting 1H-phase to the quasi-metallic 1T'-phase.
Rats in augmented reality help show how the brain determines location
Before the age of GPS, humans had to orient themselves without on-screen arrows pointing down an exact street, but rather, by memorizing landmarks and using learned relationships among time, speed and distance.
Using big data to help manage global natural assets
Research led by the University of Southampton is helping to tackle one of the biggest sustainability challenges -- looking after and nurturing the natural resources in the world around us.
For the first time, scientists 'see' dual-layered scaffolding of cellular nuclei
Our cells sometimes have to squeeze through pretty tight spaces.
The widow next door: Where is the globally invasive noble false widow settling next?
The noble false widow spider, Steatoda nobilis, native to Madeira and the Canary Islands, has been introduced accidentally to countries around the globe, causing considerable concerns.
Tuberculosis: Inhibiting host cell death with immunotherapy
DZIF scientists from the University Hospital Cologne are working on an immunotherapy that supports antibiotic treatment of tuberculosis.
Researchers identify early home and family factors that contribute to obesity
A new 21-year longitudinal study identified multiple risk factors related to the family and home environment associated with the timing and faster increase in body mass increase (BMI), ultimately leading to overweight or obesity in adulthood.
Pitch perfect: Brain differences behind a rare musical ability
New research published in JNeurosci reports features of the brain in musicians with absolute, or perfect, pitch (AP) that likely enable individuals with this rare ability -- shared by Mozart, Bach, and Beethoven -- to precisely identify musical notes.
How your smartphone is affecting your relationship
The allure of smartphones, and how they impact our interpersonal relationships, might be the result of our evolutionary history, according to a University of Arizona researcher.
More than a courier
New research reveals that parts of the neuron are far more complex than once thought.
Face transplant surgery can improve speech in victims of severe face trauma
A new case study out of New York University's Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development finds that face transplant surgery in patients who have experienced severe facial trauma can improve speech production.
Inexpensive supplement for women increases infant birth size
For women in resource-poor settings, taking a certain daily nutritional supplement before conception or in early pregnancy may provide enough of a boost to improve growth of the fetus, according to a study funded by the National Institutes of Health.
New tuberculosis drug may shorten treatment time for patients
A new experimental antibiotic for tuberculosis has been shown to be more effective against TB than isoniazid, a decades-old drug which is currently one of the standard treatments.
Is our personality affected by the way we look? (Or the way we think we look?)
To what extent is our personality an adaptation to our appearance or even our physique?
New research insights hold promise for kids with DMD
Prednisone, the current standard of care used to treat kids with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), reduces chronic inflammation but has harsh side effects.
Stress-free training may enhance surgical skill
It may be easier to learn surgical skills when a student feels less pressure and approaches surgery as a hobby, reports University of Houston professor and director of the Computational Physiology Lab Ioannis Pavlidis, in newly published research.
Network driving emergency healthcare research
The Emergency Medicine Foundation -- Australia has successfully piloted a Research Support Network to foster research in more than 30 Queensland public hospital emergency departments.
Developing a flight strategy to land heavier vehicles on Mars
The heaviest vehicle to successfully land on Mars is the Curiosity Rover at 1 metric ton, about 2,200 pounds.
PET imaging agent may allow early measurement of efficacy of breast cancer therapy
Physicians may soon have a new way to measure the efficacy of hormone therapy for breast cancer patients, according to research published in the February issue of The Journal of Nuclear Medicine.
4 opioid-related articles: Prescribing trends, overdose deaths, disparities in prescriptions
JAMA Internal Medicine is publishing four opioid-related articles (an original investigation, invited commentary and two research letters) that report on racial/ethnic and income disparities in the prescription of opioids and other other controlled medications in California, racial differences in opioid overdose deaths in New York, and county-level opioid prescribing in the United States.
Re-establishing oyster beds to maximize their ecological benefits
Researchers from North Carolina State University have developed a mapping tool that identifies sites for re-establishing oyster reefs that maximize their ecological benefits -- such as water filtration.
Scientists advance new technology to protect drinking water from Lake Erie algal toxins
Microbiologist Dr. Jason Huntley identified groups of bacteria in Lake Erie that degrade microcystin and can be used to naturally purify water.
Defending Darwin: Scientists respond to attack on evolution
Science magazine, the country's top scientific journal, has taken the rare step of publishing criticism of a new book.
Antibody could increase cure rate for blood, immune disorders, Stanford researchers say
An antibody-based treatment can gently and effectively eliminate diseased blood-forming stem cells in the bone marrow to prepare for the transplantation of healthy stem cells, according to a study in mice by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine.
Termites shape and are shaped by their mounds
Termite construction projects have no architects, engineers or foremen, and yet these centimeter-sized insects build complex, meter-sized structures all over the world.
Breaking the vicious cycles of age-related diseases
Aleksey Belikov from MIPT has proposed that rapid progression of age-related diseases may result from the formation of so-called vicious cycles.
Experts call for national research integrity advisory board
It's been proposed before, but so far no one has heeded the call for an official advisory board to support ethical behavior in research institutions.
Human enhancement: Is it good for society?
Human enhancement technologies are opening up tremendous new possibilities. But they're also raising important questions about what it means to be human.
NASA catches the 1-day life of Tropical Cyclone Neil
Tropical Cyclone Neil had a short life in the Southwestern Pacific Ocean.
Acoustic waves can monitor stiffness of living cells
MIT engineers have devised a new, non-invasive way to monitor the stiffness of single living cells, using acoustic waves.
Toward automated animal identification in wildlife research
A new program developed by researchers from Penn State and Microsoft Azure automatically detects regions of interest within images, alleviating a serious bottleneck in processing photos for wildlife research.
Scientists discover oldest evidence of mobility on Earth
Ancient fossils of the first ever organisms to exhibit movement have been discovered by an international team of scientists.
Programming autonomous machines ahead of time promotes selfless decision-making
Researchers at the US CCDC Army Research Laboratory, the Army's corporate research laboratory (ARL) in collaboration with the Army's Institute for Creative Technologies and Northeastern University published a paper today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences suggesting the use of autonomous machines increases cooperation among individuals.
X-ray laser study identifies crystalline intermediate in our 'pathway to breathing'
For the first time, scientists from ASU's School of Molecular Sciences in collaboration with colleagues from Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York City have captured snapshots of crystal structures of intermediates in the biochemical pathway that enables us to breathe.
Discovery of the oldest evidence of mobility on Earth
An international and multi-disciplinary team coordinated by Abderrazak El Albani at the Institut de chimie des milieux et matériaux de Poitiers (CNRS/Université de Poitiers) has uncovered the oldest fossilized traces of motility.
Courage a double-edged sword for economic success
Modern economies need courageous, entrepreneurial individuals to thrive yet the same qualities can bring greater risks according to a world-first study.
BFU scientists developed tungsten-based hydrogen detectors
A team of physicists from Immanuel Kant Baltic Federal University together with their colleagues from National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (NRNU MEPhI) developed a tungsten oxide-based detector of hydrogen in gas mixes.
Study of Arctic fishes reveals the birth of a gene -- from 'junk'
Though separated by a world of ocean, and unrelated to each other, two fish groups - one in the Arctic, the other in the Antarctic - share a surprising survival strategy: They both have evolved the ability to produce the same special brand of antifreeze protein in their tissues.
'Improbable things happen'
For some of us, they carry the bright blue of our grandfather's eyes.
Teacher ratings on childhood inattention, prosocial behavior associated with adult earnings
In a study of 920 boys from low-socioeconomic neighborhoods in Montreal, Canada, teacher ratings of inattention in kindergarten at ages 5 and 6 were associated with lower earnings as adults 30 years later, while increased ratings on prosocial behavior (such as helping, sharing and cooperating) were associated with higher earnings after accounting for child IQ and family adversity.
Questions in quantum computing: How to move electrons with light
To design future quantum technologies, scientists pinpoint how microwaves interact with matter.
Researchers present new findings on postpartum racial disparities and cardiovascular disease
Black women are more likely to be readmitted to the hospital after giving birth.
Montmorency tart cherry juice helped lower blood pressure and LDL 'bad' cholesterol
Montmorency tart cherry juice helped lower systolic blood pressure and LDL or ''bad'' cholesterol in older adults by reducing certain biomarkers of inflammation and oxidative stress in older adults, according to a new study published in Nutrients.
How to classify high blood pressure in pregnancy?
The American Heart Association (AHA) and the American College of Cardiology (ACC) changed their guidance to lower the threshold criteria for hypertension in adults.

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Changing The World
What does it take to change the world for the better? This hour, TED speakers explore ideas on activism—what motivates it, why it matters, and how each of us can make a difference. Guests include civil rights activist Ruby Sales, labor leader and civil rights activist Dolores Huerta, author Jeremy Heimans, "craftivist" Sarah Corbett, and designer and futurist Angela Oguntala.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#521 The Curious Life of Krill
Krill may be one of the most abundant forms of life on our planet... but it turns out we don't know that much about them. For a create that underpins a massive ocean ecosystem and lives in our oceans in massive numbers, they're surprisingly difficult to study. We sit down and shine some light on these underappreciated crustaceans with Stephen Nicol, Adjunct Professor at the University of Tasmania, Scientific Advisor to the Association of Responsible Krill Harvesting Companies, and author of the book "The Curious Life of Krill: A Conservation Story from the Bottom of the World".