Nav: Home

Science Current Events and Science News | Brightsurf | February 14, 2019


Electronic tool has potential to improve asthma care, study finds
A new electronic decision support tool for managing asthma has the potential to improve the quality of asthma care in primary care settings, suggests a study led by St.
Study affirms self-reported sleep duration as a useful health measure in children
While sleep questionnaires are commonly completed by children and their parents, there has been a lack of data comparing the validity of these self-reported sleep parameters.
New molecules reverse memory loss linked to depression, aging
New therapeutic molecules developed at Toronto's Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH) show promise in reversing the memory loss linked to depression and aging.
What's age got to do with it?
It's often said: it's not how old you are, it's how old you feel.
Diet drinks may be associated with strokes among post-menopausal women
In a large observational study, women who reported drinking more than one diet soda or other artificially sweetened drink a day had a higher risk of strokes caused by a blood clot.
C-sections by trained health officers a safe alternative
Sierra Leone has few doctors and even fewer surgeons to serve its seven million people.
Research forms complex picture of mercury pollution in a period of global change
This study looks at how climate change and land use modification impact mercury pollution in wetlands.
Men's porn habits could fuel partners' eating disorders, study suggests
A woman whose boyfriend or husband regularly watches pornography is more likely to report symptoms of an eating disorder, new research suggests.
Novel software offers possible reduction in arrhythmic heart disease
Potentially lethal heart conditions may become easier to spot and may lead to improvements in prevention and treatment thanks to innovative new software that measures electrical activity in the organ.
Platinum nanoparticles for selective treatment of liver cancer cells
Researchers at ETH Zurich recently demonstrated that platinum nanoparticles can be used to kill liver cancer cells with greater selectivity than existing cancer drugs.
High-speed surveillance in solar cells catches recombination red-handed
Using synchronized lasers pulses, Osaka University researchers developed a new method of electrostatic force microscopy that can record movies with frames as fast as 300 nanoseconds.
Spacecraft measurements reveal mechanism of solar wind heating
Queen Mary University of London has led a study which describes the first direct measurement of how energy is transferred from the chaotic electromagnetic fields in space to the particles that make up the solar wind, leading to the heating of interplanetary space.
Artificial intelligence to boost Earth system science
A study by German scientists from Jena and Hamburg shows that artificial intelligence (AI) can substantially improve our understanding of the climate and the Earth system.
'Old' sperm produces healthier offspring
Research shows that sperm that live for longer before fertilising an egg produce healthier offspring.
Biocolonizer species are putting the conservation of the granite at Machu Picchu at risk
The UPV/EHU's IBeA research group has used a non-destructive methodology to determine the role of specific algae, lichens, mosses, cyanobacteria, etc. that may be causing exfoliation and delamination, which are degrading the Sacred Rock of Machu Picchu, one of the most important symbols in the Peruvian archaeological city.
Dog burial as common ritual in Neolithic populations of north-eastern Iberian Peninsula
Coinciding with the Pit Grave culture (4200-3600 years before our era), coming from Southern Europe, the Neolithic communities of the north-eastern Iberian Peninsula started a ceremonial activity related to the sacrifice and burial of dogs.
Researchers find 14 percent of sausages mislabelled in Canada, down from last University of Guelph study
Researchers found 14 per cent of sausages contained meat ingredients not indicated on the label.
Researchers discover a weakness in a rare cancer that could be exploited with drugs
Researchers have identified a rare type of cancer cell that cannot make cholesterol, a key nutrient.
Merging neutron stars
The option to measure the gravitational waves of two merging neutron stars has offered the chance to answer some of the fundamental questions about the structure of matter.
UTSA study: Stress in crops points to surprising benefits
Stress is known as the 'killer disease' and in humans it can lead to an increased risk of terminal issues such as heart attack or stroke.
Can we repair the brain? The promise of stem cell technologies for treating parkinson's disease
Cell replacement may play an increasing role in alleviating the motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD) in future.
Personal and social factors impact return to work after ill-health
Support from managers and colleagues, as well as a positive attitude, are most likely to enable a more long-term return to work for employees after a sickness absence, according to a new review of research led by the University of East Anglia (UEA).
Antidepressant could stop deadly sepsis, study suggests
An antidepressant drug used to treat obsessive-compulsive disorder could save people from deadly sepsis, new research suggests.
What happens to magnetic nanoparticles once in cells?
Although magnetic nanoparticles are being used more and more in cell imaging and tissue bioengineering, what happens to them within stem cells in the long term remained undocumented.
Effective self-control strategies involve much more than willpower, research shows
It's mid-February, around the time that most people waver in their commitment to the resolutions they've made for the new year.
Genetic variations in a fourth gene linked to elevated leukemia risk in Hispanic children
Progress reported on understanding why Hispanic children are more likely to develop acute lymphoblastic leukemia and to die of the disease.
EarthScope announces top 10 discoveries list
What are the 10 most influential, revolutionary, unexpected, or just plain amazing discoveries from EarthScope's 15-year history?
Suspicious spots on the lungs do not behave like metastases of rhabdomyosarcoma
Small spots on CT scans of the lungs of children with muscle cancer do not have an adverse effect on survival according to an international research team in the Journal for Clinical Oncology.
Delays in banning wildlife trade put hundreds of species at risk
From parrots to lizards, hundreds of animal species could be at risk of extinction because of a policy process that responds slowly to scientific knowledge, according to a new study in Science.
Penis development needs more than just testes and testosterone
Proper development of the fetal penis requires not just testosterone from the testes, but a second hormone produced by other tissues, including the placenta, according to a new study publishing Feb.
Diet could help runners beat stomach issues
Research indicates that cutting out specific foods can alleviate the gastrointestinal issues some people experience when they exercise, with over two-thirds of people involved in a new study reporting an improvement.
Better red than dread: Barrier keeps batteries safe
A layer of red phosphorus in rechargeable lithium metal batteries can signal when damaging dendrites threaten to create a short circuit.
Immersive virtual reality therapy shows lasting effect of treatment for autism phobias
New research shows that the Blue Room, an immersive virtual reality treats 45 percent of children with autism freeing them from their fears and phobias -- and that the treatment lasts.
The Lancet: General anesthesia is unlikely to have lasting effects on the developing brains of young children
A single hour of general anaesthesia in early infancy -- longer than is necessary to perform the most common types of minor surgeries in childhood -- does not result in measurable neurodevelopmental or behavioral problems up to the age of 5 years, according to the first randomized trial of its kind involving 722 infants in seven countries, published in The Lancet.
Black-white cancer mortality gap nearly eliminated in some age groups
Although African Americans still bear a disproportionate share of the cancer burden, a new report finds the black-white gap has closed considerably over the past several decades.
Breaks in the blood-brain barrier can cause brains to get old before their time
Daniela Kaufer, a professor at UC Berkeley and fellow in the CIFAR Child & Brain Development program, has discovered one of the biological pathways that lead to age-related cognitive decline, and has found clues on how to reverse the aging process in the brain.
Kent State study finds multitasking increases in online courses compared to face-to-face
The phenomenon of multitasking across three or four internet-connected devices simultaneously is increasingly common.
Spintronics by 'straintronics'
Data storage in magnetic media is very energy consuming. Novel materials could reduce the energy needed to control magnetic memories thus contributing to a smaller carbon footprint of the IT sector.
New tool for documenting injuries may provide better evidence for elder abuse cases
Keck School of Medicine of USC scientists have developed the first standardized framework for clinicians to document physical findings on older patients for better evidence in abuse cases.
The more the merrier? Children with multiple siblings more susceptible to bullying
A child with more than one brother or sister is more likely to be the victim of sibling bullying than those with only one sibling, and firstborn children and older brothers tend to be the perpetrators, according to research published by the American Psychological Association.
Cracking colibactin's code
In an effort to understand how colibactin, a compound produced by certain strains of E. coli, may be connected to the development of colorectal cancer, Harvard researchers are exploring how the compound damages DNA to produce DNA adducts.
Controlling and visualizing receptor signals in neural cells with light
Using a novel optogenetic tool, researchers have successfully controlled, reproduced and visualized serotonin receptor signals in neural cells.
Cell study sheds light on damage linked to ageing
Some of the damaging cell effects linked to ageing could be prevented by manipulating tiny parts of cells, a study shows.
Giving keener 'electric eyesight' to autonomous vehicles
Autonomous vehicles relying on light-based image sensors often struggle to see through blinding conditions, such as fog.
Tiny satellites reveal water dynamics in thousands of northern lakes
In a finding that has implications for how scientists calculate natural greenhouse gas emissions, a new study finds that water levels in small lakes across northern Canada and Alaska vary during the summer much more than was assumed.
International protection lags scientific assessment in species threatened by trade
Species that are threatened by wildlife trade take nearly 10 years to receive international protection once identified by the scientific community, according to Eyal Frank and David Wilcove in this Policy Forum.
Companies with more financial analysts produce more and better-quality patents
Long-term growth in profits depends significantly on firms' investment in innovation activities.
NASA's Aqua satellite finds winds battering Tropical Cyclone Gelena
Tropical Cyclone Gelena is being battered by outside winds, and that's weakening the storm.
Genetic tricks of rabbits resistant to fatal viral disease
Underlying genetic variation in the immune systems of rabbits allowed them to rapidly evolve genetic resistance to the myxoma virus, a deadly rabbit pathogen introduced into Europe and Australia during the 1950s, according to a new study.
Providing follow-up care after heart attack helps reduce readmissions, deaths
A program designed to help heart attack patients with the transition from hospital to outpatient care can reduce readmissions and deaths and increase the number of patients keeping follow-up appointments, a new study suggests.
Animal venoms are sources in the search for new medicines
The study of natural toxins and their derivatives may help in the development of medicines to treat diseases like cancer and osteoarthritis, says coordinator of the Center of Excellence in New Target Discovery.
Blindfolded training could help doctors save young lives
Doctors at Geneva University Hospital have found that pediatric team leaders improve more during resuscitation training if they wear a blindfold.
Human cells can change job to fight diabetes
For the first time, researchers have shown that ordinary human cells can change their original function.
Uncovering a 'smoking gun' of biological aging clocks
A newly discovered ribosomal DNA (rDNA) clock can be used to accurately determine an individual's chronological and biological age, according to research led by Harvard T.H.
The FASEB Journal: Magnetic fields enhance bone remodeling
Since the creation of 3D-printed (3DP) porous titanium scaffolds in 2016, the scientific community has been exploring ways to improve their ability to stimulate osteogenesis, or bone remodeling.
Satellite images reveal interconnected plumbing system that caused Bali volcano to erupt
A team of scientists, led by the University of Bristol, has used satellite technology provided by the European Space Agency to uncover why the Agung volcano in Bali erupted in November 2017 after 50 years of dormancy.
Free access to research will help save horses and ponies
Laminitis -- a complex, common and often devastating disease -- is the second biggest killer of domestic horses.
Researchers create ultra-lightweight ceramic material that withstands extreme temperatures
UCLA researchers and collaborators at eight other research institutions have created an extremely light, very durable ceramic aerogel.
Shaping light lets 2D microscopes capture 4D data
Rice University researchers have created a method to design custom masks that transform 2D fluorescent microscopy images into 3D movies.
On the origin of B1 cells
A new MDC study may resolve a decades-old debate in immunology: A team led by Prof.
Hip, hip, hooray! Global study finds high success rate for hip and knee replacements
After reviewing thousands of case studies going back 25 years across six countries, generalisable survival data is now available for the first time to estimate how long hip and knee replacements are likely to last.
Interval training may shed more pounds than continuous moderate intensity workout
Interval training may shed more pounds than a continuous moderate intensity workout, suggests a pooled analysis of the available evidence, published online in the British Journal of Sports Medicine.
Sea worms and jellyfish treat cancer and kill insects
Scientists of the Pacific Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry (PIBOC) of the Far Eastern Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences (FEB RAS) and the Far Eastern Federal University (FEFU) found out marine invertebrates living in Troitsa Bay, the Sea of Japan, contain biologically active compounds with strong antitumor and antimicrobial properties, and also capable of killing insects.
Revealed: The gut microbe source of a carcinogenic, DNA-smashing genotoxin
A new study provides the first direct evidence of how a genotoxic warhead that can target and destroy the DNA of nearby cells renders its carcinogenic effects.
NRL, AFRL develop direct-write quantum calligraphy in monolayer semiconductors
An interdisciplinary team of researchers at NRL and the Air Force Research Laboratory have developed a way to directly write quantum light sources, which emit a single photon of light at a time, into monolayer semiconductors.
Single word most associated with negative hospital reviews on yelp is 'told'
A Penn Medicine research team found that the word 'told' was tied to almost 20 percent of poor reviews.
US older women three times as likely to be treated for osteoporosis as men
Older women in the US are three times as likely to be treated for osteoporosis as men of the same age, reveals research published online in the Journal of Investigative Medicine.
'Lack of cleaning' in brain cells is central to Alzheimer's disease
An international research team with representation from the University of Copenhagen has created a better understanding of Alzheimer's.
Get fit for a fit gut
Research published in Experimental Physiology has suggested that the efficiency with which we transport oxygen to our tissues (cardiorespiratory fitness) is a far greater predictor of gut microbiota diversity than either body fat percentage or general physical activity.
Neural processing with trauma and adversity interact to increase core symptom of PTSD
Lifetime adversity and increased neural processing during a traumatic event combine to increase the frequency of intrusive traumatic memories and the distress they cause, according to a new study in Biological Psychiatry: Cognitive Neuroscience and Neuroimaging.
Social threat learning influences our decisions
Learning what is dangerous by watching a video or being told (known as social learning) has just as strong an effect on our decision-making as first-hand experience of danger, researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden report.
Decolonization protocol can prevent dangerous infections among discharged hospital patients
Hospital patients who have methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) can prevent future MRSA infections by following a standard bathing protocol after discharge, according to research results published in the Feb.
Researchers reveal brain connections that disadvantage night owls
'Night owls' -- those who go to bed and get up later -- have fundamental differences in their brain function compared to 'morning larks,' which mean they could be disadvantaged by the constraints of a normal working day.
E-cig users develop some of the same cancer-related molecular changes as cigarette smokers
A small USC study shows that e-cig users develop some of the same cancer-related molecular changes in oral tissue as cigarette smokers, adding to the growing concern that e-cigs aren't a harmless alternative to smoking.
Philosophy: What exactly is a black hole?
What is a black hole? In an article that has just appeared in the journal Nature Astronomy, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich philosopher Erik Curiel shows that physicists use different definitions of the concept, depending on their own particular fields of interest.
Carbonaceous chondrites provide clues about the delivery of water to Earth
An international study led by researchers from the Institute of Space Sciences, from the Spanish National Research Council (CSIC) and the Institut d'Estudis Espacials de Catalunya has discovered that carbonaceous chondrites, a class of meteorites, incorporated hydrated minerals along with organic material from the protoplanetary disk before the formation of planets.
The ways of wisdom in schizophrenia
Researchers at UC San Diego School of Medicine report that persons with schizophrenia scored lower on a wisdom assessment than non-psychiatric comparison participants, but that there was considerable variability in levels of wisdom, and those with higher scores displayed fewer psychotic symptoms.
Tracking pollen with quantum dots
Most plant species on earth are reliant on insects for pollination, including more than 30% of the food crops we eat.
New study shows more protein and fewer calories help older people lose weight safely
A high-protein, low-calorie diet helps older adults with obesity lose more weight, maintain more muscle mass, improve bone quality and lose 'bad' fat, according to results from a new randomized controlled trial led by Wake Forest University researcher Kristen Beavers.
Darwin's rabbit helps to explain the fightback against myxomatosis
An unprecedented study of rabbit DNA spanning 150 years and thousands of miles has revealed the genetic basis for the animal's fightback against the deadly myxoma virus.
Blockchain can strengthen the credibility of meta-analyses
Blockchain -- the technology behind the secure transactions of cryptocurrencies like Bitcoin -- can make it easier for researchers to conduct transparent meta-analyses in social science research where reproducibility is a growing concern.
Finding suggests ways to promote adult heart tissue regeneration
Researchers report that they have been able to remove the 'breaks' that hold back cardiomyocyte proliferation, opening the possibility for treating heart disease by reprogramming adult cardiomyocytes to a more fetal cell state.
When research participation pays, some people lie, Penn study suggests
Offering compensation can be an important tactic to attract potential participants for enrollment in research studies, but it might come at a cost.
UBC researchers develop diagnostic tool for detecting cryptosporidium
Using a small and inexpensive biosensor, researchers in the School of Engineering have developed a novel low-cost technique that quickly and accurately detects cryptosporidium contamination in water samples.
Super-light, super-insulating ceramic aerogel keeps the hottest temperatures at bay
Researchers have developed a near weightless material, comprised mostly of air, capable of both withstanding and protecting against some of the most extreme temperatures experienced in aerospace and industrial environments.
How proteins become embedded in a cell membrane
Many proteins with important biological functions are embedded in a biomembrane in the cells of humans and other living organisms.
Brain pathways of aversion identified
What happens in the brain when we feel discomfort? Researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden are now one step closer to finding the answer.
Aloe sanginalis, a new red Aloe from Somaliland
Aloe sanguinalis, or Somali Red Aloe, forms large, conspicuous clumps and has blood red sap.
Molecular Lego blocks
Organic semiconductors are lightweight, flexible and easy to manufacture. But they often fail to meet expectations regarding efficiency and stability.
Making better embryos
One out of every six Canadian couples experiences infertility. Some resort to in vitro fertilization.
Combo T cell and targeted therapy strategy for resistant melanoma with BRAF mutation
Collaborative research by The Wistar Institute and Moffitt Cancer Center has demonstrated that BRAF targeted therapies render resistant melanoma more sensitive to the attack of killer T cells.
Most triggers for irregular heartbeat can be easily modified
A personal survey of patients with atrial fibrillatio, one of the most important causes of irregular heartbeats, has found that the majority of triggers for the condition are easily modifiable lifestyle choices, including alcohol, caffeine, exercise and lack of sleep.
Massive Bolivian earthquake reveals mountains 660 kilometers below our feet
Princeton geophysicists Jessica Irving and Wenbo Wu used data from an enormous earthquake in Bolivia to find mountains at the base of the mantle's transition zone, located 660 kilometers below our feet.
Study on measles transmission in China have implications for controlling the epidemic worldwide
A new study on the measles epidemic in China has far-reaching implications for eliminating the infection globally.
It doesn't take much for soldiers to feel cared for
Caring texts sent to active-duty military had important findings in reducing suicide.
The language of conversation impacts on the 'synchronization' of our brains
Experts from the Basque research center BCBL have shown for the first time that the way in which the activity of two brains is connected depends on whether the dialogue takes place in the native language or in a foreign language.
Gravitational waves will settle cosmic conundrum
Measurements of gravitational waves from approximately 50 binary neutron stars over the next decade will definitively resolve an intense debate about how quickly our universe is expanding, according to findings from an international team that includes University College London (UCL) and Flatiron Institute cosmologists.
Role of interventional inflammatory bowel disease in the era of biologic therapy
According to a new statement from a panel of national and international experts in gastroenterology, inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and other areas, interventional (or therapeutic) IBD endoscopy has an expanding role in the treatment of disease and of adverse events from surgery.
Simple bile acid blood test could tell risk of stillbirth
Clinical researchers at Guy's and St Thomas' and King's College London have found a better way to measure the risk of stillbirth for women with a common liver disorder through a simple blood test.
Neuroendocrine tumors: Choosing the best treatment
An increasing number of anti-cancer drugs are made available each year.
Use of clinical apps significantly improves quality of cardiovascular care
A pilot program using several clinical decision support tools in the outpatient setting to treat and educate stable ischemic heart disease patients has shown success in improving angina in these patients.
SDSU researchers find new way to measure nicotine exposure in children
A team of researchers from SDSU has found silicone wristbands to be an effective way to measure children's exposure to secondhand smoke.
New molecular blueprint advances our understanding of photosynthesis
Researchers at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory have used one of the most advanced microscopes in the world to reveal the structure of a large protein complex crucial to photosynthesis, the process by which plants convert sunlight into cellular energy.
Lipoproteins behave 'almost like a tiny Velcro ball'
Setbacks in drug trials aiming to raise HDL have led researchers to reassess the particle's effects on heart health.
Statins could protect against motor neurone disease
High cholesterol has been found to be a possible risk factor for the development of motor neurone disease (MND), according to a large study of genetic data led in the UK by Queen Mary University of London, in collaboration with the National Institutes of Health in the USA.
Immunological scarring from coeliac disease
Immune cells in the bowel of people who suffer with coeliac disease are permanently replaced by a new subset of cells that promote inflammation, suggests a new study involving researchers at Cardiff University.
Oldest Americans most focused on reducing food waste
The vast majority of Americans are paying attention to reducing food waste with the oldest being the most cognizant, according to the latest Michigan State University (MSU) Food Literacy and Engagement Poll.
Marin County: Safe harbor for Native residents during the Mission era and beyond
Contrary to the dominant narrative of cultural extinction, indigenous residents of Marin County survived colonization, preserving and passing on their traditions and cultural practices.
Hop to it: Researchers evaluate rabbits' evolved resistance to myxoma virus
Partnering with the University of Cambridge and several other research institutes, Biodesign researchers, as part of Grant McFadden's Center of for Immunotherapy, Vaccines and Virotherapy, validated the role of specific rabbit genes in contributing to this acquired resistance in research published in Science Magazine.
To tool or not to tool?
Flexible tool use is closely associated to higher mental processes such as the ability to plan actions.
NASA's Aqua Satellite eyes Tropical Cyclone Oma near Vanuatu
Visible imagery from NASA's Aqua satellite revealed the center of Tropical Cyclone Oma was just northwest of the island of Vanuatu in the South Pacific Ocean.
Moffitt researchers characterize mechanism of action of CAR T cells
Despite progress being made, scientists have not been completely certain of how CAR T cells function mechanistically.
From vibrations alone, acacia ants can tell nibbles from the wind
Researchers reporting in the journal Current Biology on Feb. 14 find that the ants of the acacia tree are tipped off to the presence of herbivores by vibrations that run throughout the trees when an animal gets too close or begins to chew.
New live-imaging technique reveals cellular repair crew plugging leaky biological barrier
Suppose you live in a brick house and notice cracks in the mortar that let in cold air, rain and insect pests.
In zebrafish eggs, most rapidly growing cell inhibits neighbors through mechanical signals
In animal embryonic development a group of cells starts out all being the same.
Improved RNA data visualization method gets to the bigger picture faster
Like going from a pinhole camera to a Polaroid, a significant mathematical update to the formula for a popular bioinformatics data visualization method will allow researchers to develop snapshots of single-cell gene expression not only several times faster but also at much higher-resolution.
The smallest skeletons in the marine world observed in 3D by synchrotron techniques
Coccolithophores are microscopic marine algae that use carbon dioxide to grow and release carbon dioxide when they create their miniature calcite shells.
Study suggests lazy eye associated with children's sense of self-perception
This observational study looked at whether the condition known as 'lazy eye' (amblyopia) was associated with an altered sense of self-perception in children (ages 3 to 7) and whether any differences in self-perception were associated with deficiencies in vision and fine motor skills like coordination.
Risk analysis releases special issue on the social science of automated driving
Risk Analysis, An International Journal has published a special issue, 'Social Science of Automated Driving,' which features several articles examining the human side of automated driving, focusing on questions about morality, the role of feeling, trust and risk perceptions.
Results of early endoscopic exam critical for assessment of Barrett's patients
A new study indicates that both high-grade abnormal cellular changes (dysplasia) and esophageal adenocarcinoma (a form of cancer) have increased in the last 25 years among people with a digestive condition known as Barrett's esophagus.

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Don't Fear Math
Why do many of us hate, even fear math? Why are we convinced we're bad at it? This hour, TED speakers explore the myths we tell ourselves and how changing our approach can unlock the beauty of math. Guests include budgeting specialist Phylecia Jones, mathematician and educator Dan Finkel, math teacher Eddie Woo, educator Masha Gershman, and radio personality and eternal math nerd Adam Spencer.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#517 Life in Plastic, Not Fantastic
Our modern lives run on plastic. It's in the computers and phones we use. It's in our clothing, it wraps our food. It surrounds us every day, and when we throw it out, it's devastating for the environment. This week we air a live show we recorded at the 2019 Advancement of Science meeting in Washington, D.C., where Bethany Brookshire sat down with three plastics researchers - Christina Simkanin, Chelsea Rochman, and Jennifer Provencher - and a live audience to discuss plastics in our oceans. Where they are, where they are going, and what they carry with them. Related links:...